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cwinn

One way hyd. cylinders

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Some of you will think this is a dumb question,but I 'm not real familiar with these.Can I take an old orginal IH oneway hyd. cylinder and drill out the vent and put in a fitting to make it a two way cylinder??I have aquired several off old 400 planters and would like to use them on my IH trailer plows to make them look authentic with the IH cylinder.Thanks for any help or suggestions.I like the looks of IH equipment with a IH cylinder,maybe I'm just silly like the spouse seems to think.

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If it has a vent, it already sounds to be a two-way; just modified to operate as a one-way. Regular one-ways (at least the ones I've seen) do not have any seals at the internal end of the rod.....just a keeper ring that prevents the rod from coming all the way out. Again, this is only what I've seen and they are not IH brand.

Thanks

Mark

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True one-way cylinders have vent, usually a slot with no threads where cylinder could have hose attaced and turn it into a two way.

Two way cylinders have vent threaded into hole where hose would attach to operate the cylinder as two way. In old days I would drill a pipe plug and insert a cotter key to vent a two way cylinder when I wanted to use it as a one way. Now you can buy a true vent to convert a two way cylinder to one way.

Some more expensive two way cylinders have both hoses attached at same end. The oil istransported to other end of cylinder thru a tube on tope of cylinder. These still can be vented and used as one way.

One way cylinders only work if implement has weight and gravity to lower it and oil raises it. Or in case of some front mounted cultivators the one way raised the cultivator gangs and a spring mounted on the cylinder bracket pulle the one way cylinder back.

Bill

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Well said Bill.

The use of a two way cylinder is pretty much a waste unless your tractor is equipped with power down on the hydraulics. If you have it great if you don't you'd be wasting your time.

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Thanks for the quick insite guys,I guess what Bill is saying in not so many words is use the oneway cylider anyway for the plow??I guess it would'nt hurt because we use stops on all our plows anyway so we all plow about the same depth.These will be pulled with a 400 ,MDTA,or 706G,all 4bottoms.Couple years ago we couldnt find trailer plows now this year we all have a nice set to pull and not enough cylinders.Just having fun and not spending alot of money .Hope I didnt over think this ,thanks again..

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CWINN, Plow has plenty of weight and suction when plowing to keep plow down so one way will work fine especially with mechanical stops to control depth. Two way cylinder will not "force" plow in ground ,just raise the land wheel off the ground if ground is real hard. We used to joke that in hard ground you could put a wheel weight on land wheel and even fill with fluid so that when you raised wheel the extra weight would "force" plow in ground. Believe me it would not be worth the effort.

Good luck, Bill

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My 710 semimount has a one way cylinder on the tail wheel. I think in your case a one way would be more authentic and work fine. Also one less hose to buy and have go bad.

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Back in the day Dad always had 2-way cylinders on the plows, disc's, etc. But that was more due to the fact the old '47 M & '51 M had 2-way hyd, the M even the live M&W pump. Then the SM-TA & 450 were both live 2-way.

Like everyone said, a 2-way cyl. on a pull type plow won't make any difference, at least on a disc you can raise the transport wheels off the ground.

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Our old 3x14" # 8 & 3x14 #16 plows both had 2 way cylinders but as Doc said, our M & SM both had live hyds. First plow that I used that had a 1-way cylinder was our IH # 540. Bought a new 710 in 1975 that had a 1-way cylinder on the tail wheel. IHboog's 7x16" onland # 720 has 2 way cylinders front & rear. Only difference I can see between a 2 way & a 1-way cylinder is that the 2-way will "lower" the plow to the ground where as the 1-way let's it "drop". A restrictor could be put into the hyd line to slow the "drop" on a 1-way.

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Looks like this has already been fairly well hashed out but I thought I would throw in my 2ยข as well... ;)

Of all the plows we have had since I was a kid until now, (which has been quite a few) I don't think we ever used anything but a one-way cylinder on any of them. Like others have said, there is really no need for a 2-way cylinder in that application.

Not that it matters, but if you are going for originality, the cylinder off of a 400 cyclo is probably not actually "correct". Of course it might depend on what plow you are using but most trailer plows that I am aware of didn't use that style.

That said - those cylinders would still work well in the plow application, I would think. You might want to check and see what the stroke it though.

-FT

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Wow this topic got popular .Thanks for the info guys,I know the cylinder from the 70's isnt old enough but I havent found the correct one yet and I have a couple off planters that were junked.I will surely be trying it on my plow.Billohio I've heard of that done around here with the fluid in tires to make the plow penetrate,wish we had so of the western dirt to plow like ya see in all the videos instead of all this rock and shale in New York,then it would be alot more fun.Oh well, still fun anyway and cheaper then tractor pulling.Thanks again for the help

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My 540 4x16 has one just like he said.

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