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Delta Dirt

help----age & manufacturer of mule plow??

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Anybody able to identify the manufacturer and possible age of this wood beam mule plow??

It's missing the plow point--------and I beleive the left handle mounted to the slide off of the rear of the point.

In the second photo (upside down view)---------you can see the bolts holding the shank to the beam are "swedged head" (heated and swollen)-------with no actual bolt head to the bolt.

The cross bars between the handles are hex shaped------almost seems to be hand carved??? Coloring on bottom of plow appears to be blue-ish or gray. I find no markings or identification.

Any ideas will be appreciated.

post-1200-0-23711800-1331747824_thumb.jp

edit: see #2 photo on next posting

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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#2 photo-----------(upside down view) -----mule plow from above:

post-1200-0-18707300-1331748100_thumb.jp

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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In about 1951 some Black Folks in my area of South Carolina still plowed with a pair of oxen.

They had a plow like that one, if I remember correctly; been a long time.

That one looks in excellent condition must have been in a barn some place.

I think farmers once took better care of their equipment than they do today.

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oleman--------

Do you think this plow would have been pulled by a single mule/oxen----------or a pair?? (most likely mules here in Mississippi)

I found a single tree with it------but don't know that the single tree actually belonged with the plow.

Think you are right---------this old plow musta been inside for a long time; its in pretty decent shape for its apparent age. Loadstar posted a picture of an old wooden beam plow of his grandfather's on the "Montana thread"------saying it dated back to the early 1900's. Its a similar plow-----but a little different.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Man that thing is old! Dad has one very similar maybe larger. You could pull those with two or one animal depending on animal size. If you had a large powerful draft horse or mule you could get by with one. With smaller animals you needed two. That thing could be from the late 1800's but that just a guess. Theres a whole bunch of manufacturers that made plows in the early days before McCormick Deering and other companies started buying up all the smaller mom and pop equiptment manufacturers. Check the wisconsin historical site for clues and you can look at the book 150 Years of International Harvester by C.H. Wendel also. That book lists most of the plow companies bought up by IH or McCormick Deering in the early years.

P.S.

Nice truck!

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After a little research heres what I found. The steel plow is an oliver from 1915 and the wooden one is from 1894.

One of the plow companies old Cyrus McCormick bought up was P&O. If your plow had a steel beam I would say it was from the 1900's. Since yours is almost all wood I would have to say late 1800's.

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post-52693-0-93541900-1331898400.jpg

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Anson,

Are you going to try and make a crop this year with that plow?

Harold

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The wooden beam plow by design could be in the 1800's BUT I expect the one our neighbors used only dated back, probably to the iron scarse days of WW2.

I have seen steel beam plows for sale new in the farm store in the early 50's.

I never plowed with a wooden beam plow but followed many hours behind a steel beam plow.

There were 2 moldboards that we used a 1 horse, smaller plow used for plowing up peanuts, potatos and other root crops and a 2 horse used for turning under previous years corn cotton and tobacco stalks.

We raked the stalks into small wind rows and then burned them; added to the fertilizer and killed off the bugs.

I expect that before the mules there were oxen used all over.

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The wooden beam plow by design could be in the 1800's BUT I expect the one our neighbors used only dated back, probably to the iron scarse days of WW2.

I have seen steel beam plows for sale new in the farm store in the early 50's.

I never plowed with a wooden beam plow but followed many hours behind a steel beam plow.

There were 2 moldboards that we used a 1 horse, smaller plow used for plowing up peanuts, potatos and other root crops and a 2 horse used for turning under previous years corn cotton and tobacco stalks.

We raked the stalks into small wind rows and then burned them; added to the fertilizer and killed off the bugs.

I expect that before the mules there were oxen used all over.

You could be right on the ww2 thing which is a good point I have'nt thought of.....the only way we will know for sure is to try and find an identifying mark on the steel as many of the wooden plows got replacement wood put on them at some point....heck of a lot easier to replace wood than steel in those days!

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After even further inspection that thing looks a little crude to be 1900's to me. the upside down pic tells me that...

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Thanks for the insight ya'll. The swedge head on the bolts mounting the shank to the beam are definitely primitive------other bolts are a form of carriage head/plow bolts.

Harold---------yep; getting the old mule tuned up right now---------and gotta get the vertical exhaust sytem mounted up on him. I figure if anyone had ever invented a vertical exhaust sytem for the mule----------tractors would have been much harder to sell!!!! :huh::o:blink::lol:

As rough a ride as the steel wheels and lugs were----------they were a definite improvement over the mule.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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When the day was over and I had been plowing peanuts in a field a mile from the barn, I could unhook the traceses at the plow, double them over the hames, crawl on the mules back and she would take me back to the barn!!! without any guidance from me at all.

Lets see you do that with and T R A C T O R !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

My IH464 always gets lost! unless I carefully guide it and if I fell off it would have no qualms about running me over and over!.

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The old mule would tell you when noon time and quitting time came also.

I never worked one in the field----------but have heard of many that absolutely would not move between 12 noon and 1:00 p.m. .

I do remember passing by Cummings Prison Farm in Arkansas on numerous occasions late in the afternoon--------they worked mostly grey mules in the field. You could see the long grey line of mules walking single file back to the headquarters------the convicts would be riding along just as you described. There would be so many---------that you could see the dust cloud created by the mules long before you could see the mules themselves. (wish I had a picture of that scene-------that's an era gone by now)

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Dad and I used to cut hay with the mules.....also tried to plant corn with them one year......that didnt work so hot! Mules work awesome for cutting hay cause they walk at a faster steady pace than any team of horses can. Those mules could really make that old No.9 McCormick Deering high gear mower sing! Dad would drop a field then I would go through with the '47 M and cunningham crimper.

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