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actvd@bigpond.com

TD14A suck or blow?

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According to the arrow on your gauge Vic, mine seems to be running in the correct temp range. Excellent! I am not accustomed to seeing temp gauges over the half way mark, so I thought it was getting warmer than it should.

Even though the gauge on mine is non genuine, it runs almost exactly where that arrow is, sometimes just a fraction higher.

Also explains why it takes so long to cool down (to where I thought it should read) if it is already running at the correct temp!

Good advice about not letting it get hot, the head cracking threads on here are what made me want to do something about it in the first place.

I wouldn't mind getting my hands on one of those original temp gauges though, does anyone have one, and are they electric or capillary?

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Just look on the back of your gauge. If there's a wire hooked to it, it is electric. My philosophy is, if it ain't broke don't fix it!

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Yeah I agree Vic, it's a good philosophy to live by. I was asking because If its electric, then I don't really want to chase down 56 year old wiring, if capillary like mine however, it would be simpler if I found a genuine instrument.

Probably more trouble than its worth, and since it "aint broke" then it can stay as is.

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Originals were all capillary.

Vic says to keep the radiator full, and that is no lie. I don't know why it is, but IH did not run much of a water pump on these things. They move a fair amount of water by the numbers, but I don't think they were able to produce much force. Another large factor in cracking heads.

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The TD-14 was my first experience with a diesel anything! It would overheat and then drop back to normal temperature. It did that a few times until the head eventually cracked. I had it welded but decided that I had not kept the radiator topped off. After putting the engine back together, I kept the radiator full and the temperature always warmed up to normal without oveheating. That was an expensive lesson! I now have both tractors set up with a 50-50 mix of anti-freeze & they behave as designed.

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Here goes for North Central Washington State:

40 liters =10.57 U.S. gallons. At $12.95/US gallon the price would be just under $140.

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Yeah, I put antifreeze in the 14 cause' its handy to have running when it snows....sticker shock!

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Yeah, I put antifreeze in the 14 cause' its handy to have running when it snows....sticker shock!

Has anyone tried putting stop leak in the radiator to fix a cracked head/bad head gasket and leaking radiator?

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When I first got my 14 the radiator leaked all over the place. I dumped a ton of stop leak in it & took care of all of them!

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When I first got my 14 the radiator leaked all over the place. I dumped a ton of stop leak in it & took care of all of them!

Is one stop leak better than the other? I heard that the stop leak with copper in it works pretty good. Also is the radiator cap suppose to have a rubber seal on it, mine has no seal on it, but I was wondering how pressure is bleed off if the pressure gets to high with no pop off cap.

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It seems like I used a liquid stop leak containing copper. I'm no expert on those old cooling systems but I doubt that the radiator needs to be pressurized. Increasing the pressure allows the coolant to go above boiling temperature before the system boils over. You don't want your tractor to get that hot, period!

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Be wary of stopleak, it will also stop your thermostat from working right. The stat is a two way valve that closes of flow into the block and the same time it allows flow to the rad. The stop leak gums movement and the stat will not slide properly. It you can get the stat out it without damage it can still be cleaned up. But at some point is also gets stopped permenant in whatever position.

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Be wary of stopleak, it will also stop your thermostat from working right. The stat is a two way valve that closes of flow into the block and the same time it allows flow to the rad. The stop leak gums movement and the stat will not slide properly. It you can get the stat out it without damage it can still be cleaned up. But at some point is also gets stopped permenant in whatever position.

I understood that when I used the stop leak, but at my age (and the tractor's) I was trying to get lucky, and apparently I did. I've never had a problem with the system since!

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Would removing the thermostat be a good idea if you don't run in the winter, also do you guys fill your radiator up close to the top of the opening or just fill it above the radiator core leaving room for expansion. I was also thinking of using lucas oil treatment in the engine to stop some blowby has anyone ever used this product in your dozer? Thanks for any help

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Here's my opinion on the cooling system. I think that removing the thermostat would allow the engine to run too cool in most cases. If the system is not plugged up & the pump is O.K. it wouldn't be necessary to remove it. I also found that if I filled the radiator full, it would seek its operating level by spilling some over. It comes out the cap even with the gasket in place. It runs fine with the level to the top of the metal as I look into the top of the radiator. I would think that if a stuck compression ring was causing the blowby, an additive might help. You might learn something from a compression check. Hopefully the "real" mechanics will chime in!

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Running without the stat will at the very least cause uneven wear in the cylinder. Excessive wear will happen at each point the cold water hits the cylinder. For this design over auto engines it is even worse. As i stated the stat is a 2-way valve, water is directed thru the block or the rad. If you remove it the water will take whatever path is easiest. So can run hot in seconds if water chooses to recirculate in the engine instead of into the rad.

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Use the thermostat, just make sure it is working properly. Get yourself a cheap Infra Red non-contact thermometer. harbor Freight has them for $35.00. You can tell exactly how hot each spot is and whether the guage or thermostat is working correctly. just shoot it at the housing. Remember that the "beam" gets bigger the farther you are away from the item being tested.

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