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Cool info about the industrial wheel tractors. How much would one of those weigh? 

I like the ad of the I-4 I think it would be cool to drive one of those. When I saw that ad I thought about a Massy-Harris industrial tractor that was set up that way. It was on Classic Tractor Fever but I believe the owner said that it was used on a Navy ship in the middle or late 1940’s

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8 hours ago, redneckchevy9 said:

baler_ColumbiaBaler.jpgthis is a small one, but very vintage!  I would like to see one of these in action

Here's one working.  Sign on this one said it was made by the Ohio Cultivator Co of Bellevue, OH

 

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2 hours ago, hillman said:

w4 hood and magneto are the saem

With that rig on it I think its worth saving. I have lots of W4 parts and engines. same as a Farmall h engine

Well that made it expensive. Guess I need to go trade ole Tom some welding for another tractor

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1 hour ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Cool info about the industrial wheel tractors. How much would one of those weigh? 

I like the ad of the I-4 I think it would be cool to drive one of those. When I saw that ad I thought about a Massy-Harris industrial tractor that was set up that way. It was on Classic Tractor Fever but I believe the owner said that it was used on a Navy ship in the middle or late 1940’s

an i4 with that rig would be around 2 1/2 tons

 

industrials.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Howard_P said:

Here's one working.  Sign on this one said it was made by the Ohio Cultivator Co of Bellevue, OH

 

Interesting baler and it seems to make a nice bale of straw. Sounds like the pulleys are a bit loose on it. 

I bet this IH 300 with TA was real handy on that baler. Slow down or speed up without clutching. Not sure on the baler model but the ad is from 1956. 

56 IH TA.jpg

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Allis-Chalmers didn't realize just how close they had it with the roto baler. All they needed to do was make the bale larger. 

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10 hours ago, M35A2 said:

Allis-Chalmers didn't realize just how close they had it with the roto baler. All they needed to do was make the bale larger. 

Well, yes, but at the time of the Roto-Baler, we still needed to heft those bales with nothing but human brawn. The round bales increased in size only after our tractor loaders (and hydraulics) were advanced enough to do the job. The guy that invented the skid loader helped the situation along too.....

 

Keith-

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17 hours ago, dads706 said:

I've never been around one, never even been within 100 feet of one. I do know as a kid it seemed like some guys would bale the last cutting and leave the bales in the field for the cows in winter. Claimed they shed rain and didn't rot like a square bale would. Makes sense then same as now.   

Buddy collects AC tractors, says there are hundreds of roto balers out there if you are looking for one.

There were quite a few on them back in the day in my neck of the woods (NW Missouri).  They would shed rain, but if you left them on the ground for very long they got pretty nasty underneath, made a nice place for snakes to hang out, and killed the grass under them.

Couldn't feed flakes like you could with small square bales, and had to handle them with hay hooks.  And they didn't stack as well as square bales.

And every once in a while, they'd eat a guy.  Classmate of mine lost his dad to one back in the late 60's.

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4 hours ago, Steve C. said:

 

And every once in a while, they'd eat a guy.  Classmate of mine lost his dad to one back in the late 60's.

Very few of the roto balers around here as it was mostly New Holland territory. I've heard of a couple of incidents of operators getting pulled into the newer big round balers too. One survived, one didn't. I'm usually thinking about those incidents whenever I get out to check anything on my New Holland 847. 

Here is a rare one. An Oliver baler from 1950. Engine drive although I think that series Oliver tractor already had live pto. 

1950 Oliver baler.jpg

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ZEMP Self loading wagon ad5a5a7c3cd484c_ZempLadewagen.thumb.JPG.2df1291632d69d64edc51d4553642e4f.JPG

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23 hours ago, Steve C. said:

There were quite a few on them back in the day in my neck of the woods (NW Missouri).  They would shed rain, but if you left them on the ground for very long they got pretty nasty underneath, made a nice place for snakes to hang out, and killed the grass under them.

Couldn't feed flakes like you could with small square bales, and had to handle them with hay hooks.  And they didn't stack as well as square bales.

And every once in a while, they'd eat a guy.  Classmate of mine lost his dad to one back in the late 60's.

I remember my Dad and brother talking someone had baled for my Grandfather with one of those balers but I never saw the bales. I think it was a case of a good idea ahead of its time so it was a dud. guys were not ready for large bales and those little bales would be a pita IMHO. I wonder how much hay was in one of those bales because they look the size of a small square but they wouldn't be packed 

 

this pic is from the same brochure

roto.jpg

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19 hours ago, Loadstar said:

Very few of the roto balers around here as it was mostly New Holland territory. I've heard of a couple of incidents of operators getting pulled into the newer big round balers too. One survived, one didn't. I'm usually thinking about those incidents whenever I get out to check anything on my New Holland 847. 

Here is a rare one. An Oliver baler from 1950. Engine drive although I think that series Oliver tractor already had live pto. 

1950 Oliver baler.jpg

Was a guy north of where i grew up trying to cut twine or wrapped hay off rolls as tractor idled pto on, big baler jd maybe. Pulled him in and ground muscles on his back up pretty good. His wife wandered along just in time to save him. He still farmed after but had to do extensive therapy and didnt move too good. Super nice guy. 

 

29 minutes ago, hillman said:

I remember my Dad and brother talking someone had baled for my Grandfather with one of those balers but I never saw the bales. I think it was a case of a good idea ahead of its time so it was a dud. guys were not ready for large bales and those little bales would be a pita IMHO. I wonder how much hay was in one of those bales because they look the size of a small square but they wouldn't be packed 

 

this pic is from the same brochure

roto.jpg

May be wrong but i thought they were close in size and weight to a square bale. Belt tension compacted hay some. Think one of the big downfalls was you had to stop for twine to wrap every bale and dump. Fil worked on a farm in southern iowa for a while. Guy across the road had one he ran behind a wd45 i think. Said he kept it wound up and front wheels would come off ground every time he threw hand clutch in after bale ejected. Idk his story.

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I guess your are right there iowaboy.if you think about it the core of a hard core bale ( or a mini hardcore bale) is about the same size as a small square. I just can't see doing about 10,000 of those and putting them in a hay mow:angry:

 

ih300 baler.jpg

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22 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

May be wrong but i thought they were close in size and weight to a square bale. Belt tension compacted hay some. Think one of the big downfalls was you had to stop for twine to wrap every bale and dump. Fil worked on a farm in southern iowa for a while. Guy across the road had one he ran behind a wd45 i think. Said he kept it wound up and front wheels would come off ground every time he threw hand clutch in after bale ejected. Idk his story.

They could be wrapped pretty tight.  I handled quite a few that were pretty hefty.

They had some good and bad features.  A broken twine didn't cause a bale to fall apart, but it was a lot harder to get the twine off and keep it picked up when you fed.

Overall, I didn't care for them much.  IIRC, AC sold a bunch of WD45s to run them, since I think they had live power and a hand clutch.

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1 hour ago, hillman said:

I guess your are right there iowaboy.if you think about it the core of a hard core bale ( or a mini hardcore bale) is about the same size as a small square. I just can't see doing about 10,000 of those and putting them in a hay mow:angry:

 

ih300 baler.jpg

"Doing about 10,000 of those and putting in a hay mow". I can't see doing it with cubes either anymore.  But they did.   I sometimes wonder how much little hay bales were limiting the size of farms

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I have seen those a-c Roto balers but not in person but I imagine that they were a good setup with a WD-45.

I don’t really have any old baler ads from the 40’s and 50’s but here is another one of the cub lo-boy. 

C43CFBED-9D42-4558-AE60-06ACA2BA3488.jpeg

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400 Series Balers, from the late 60s and early 70s.  BK

1969.jpg

1970 (1).jpg

1970 (3).jpg

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8 hours ago, AKwelder said:

"Doing about 10,000 of those and putting in a hay mow". I can't see doing it with cubes either anymore.  But they did.   I sometimes wonder how much little hay bales were limiting the size of farms

I know they did it. been there done that, I can't stand the heat now let alone the work ! and then it don't seem like we get enough hayin' weather anymore and where would you find kids to do it ? LOL

. I like my round baler B)

 

ihi4ad.jpg

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On 1/12/2018 at 9:57 PM, Loadstar said:

I bet this IH 300 with TA was real handy on that baler. Slow down or speed up without clutching. Not sure on the baler model but the ad is from 1956. 

 

That looks like a Model 45 that I grew up looking at from the tractor seat.  They were built from 1946 to 1958 from what I've found. 

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Aha found a baler ad! This is a newer baler ad from a successful farming magazine issue for April of 1980 it’s a model 420 New Holland.  

As brady boy posted the IH balers I would think a 656 hydro with one of those square balers would be a nice setup 😏

B8DAEDB8-284F-48F4-B89F-82130F06F0C1.jpeg

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2 hours ago, IHhogfarmer said:

Aha found a baler ad! This is a newer baler ad from a successful farming magazine issue for April of 1980 it’s a model 420 New Holland.  

As brady boy posted the IH balers I would think a 656 hydro with one of those square balers would be a nice setup 😏

B8DAEDB8-284F-48F4-B89F-82130F06F0C1.jpeg

The 656 Hydro on the baler was great.  Although, full disclosure, we had a JD baler behind it, lol.  BK

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This is an interesting and different method of baling. In a 1953 New Holland ad they appear to be baling from a stack of either hay or straw. Using a model 77 baler powered by a Wisconsin V4 and without a tractor hitched to it. 

 

53 NH 77.jpg

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18 hours ago, Loadstar said:

This is an interesting and different method of baling. In a 1953 New Holland ad they appear to be baling from a stack of either hay or straw. Using a model 77 baler powered by a Wisconsin V4 and without a tractor hitched to it. 

 

53 NH 77.jpg

Baling like that is sometimes still done in Switzerland, mostly done before the new hay went up into the loft or when being sold: 

 

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Bucher Seed Drill 1959

5a5eb40590f70_Buchersaemaschinen2.thumb.jpg.78250845cfb4610c1ddcc1340c068ca2.jpg

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2 hours ago, U-C said:

Baling like that is sometimes still done in Switzerland, mostly done before the new hay went up into the loft or when being sold: 

 

That baler has two feeder forks.  Never have seen a JD square baler like that.  Must be for European conditions.

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