clay neubauer

Vintage Ads

5,789 posts in this topic

13 minutes ago, Loadstar said:

No , the one I have here has an outlet that you plug the grease gun into. Special filler adaptor is on the grease gun.  Then just pump the gun full. 

This one  from Aro in 1947 was quite a deluxe greasing unit. Not the kind  of thing you would want to be carrying up the ladder of a  combine  though. 

scan0040.jpg

Dads got a little newer one than in the ad we used to use it to grease the plows in the yard. It came from a service station. He has a citi service grease bucket on a hand pump someplace also here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That type grease pump was what you had to grease a crawler. High volume low pressure,big button head fittings. Always filled the regular grease gun from track roller pump until about 1980. Much neater than sucking grease out of a bucket which was the other way before card board tube got cheap. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Pumps grease from original container without removing cover...how's it do that?...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 7/14/2017 at 10:30 AM, Loadstar said:

Interesting idea for wheels. I'd guess they rode smoother than the typical steel wheels and lugs we used to see here on tractors. 

Here is a 1950 Esso grease ad. I remember my dad filling the grease gun with a pump and bucket like this one. In fact I still have it somewhere. 

50 Esso grease.jpg

In the book that I have it said does wheels rode about the same as rubber tires. We had a very similar Grease feeler back in Switzerland that we used until we moved in 1997. Here is another spring wheel that only used a little rubber manufactured and patented by the Hans Huerlimann Traktoren und Motorenwerke in the 40s.

 H21.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, U-C said:

In the book that I have it said does wheels rode about the same as rubber tires. We had a very similar Grease feeler back in Switzerland that we used until we moved in 1997. Here is another spring wheel that only used a little rubber manufactured and patented by the Hans Huerlimann Traktoren und Motorenwerke in the 40s.

 H21.jpg

See run flat technology in the 40s already.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Since I've been working with a Ford 6000 Commander last week I looked up this old Country Guide ad from 1966 that shows a pretty good example of what the tractor looked like when new. Wheatland version of course with no 3 point hitch but it did have the 10 speed Selectospeed power shift transmission. 

 

Ford 6000 ad (1 of 1).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This isn't a ad but thought I'd show a LP model 6000. Not gonna say it's rare but just guessing I bet there aren't very many around, especially that still run like this one.

 

ford 6000 LP -2.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have always been interested in the 6000 series Fords, both the red and gray originals, and the later, improved blue series.

I probably have mentioned this before, but there has been a red and gray 6000 setting back off of US 281 on the north side of Hamilton, TX for at least 35 years, and I found at least 12-15 of the blue ones just driving around Erath and Comanche counties, which tells me that Ford had at least one strong dealership in that area. I also found five or six dead ones at the old CCC bin site just east of Exeter, NE, on US Hiway 6.

I think the attraction lies in the styling, as well as a tractor of that size being such a departure from what Ford had previously been associated with.

I wish there was a book written on the development of this series, and would list all of problems that led to Ford buying back the red ones, rebuilding them, and releasing them as the blue Commander series.  Many years ago, Antique Power magazine had a pretty good article about them, showing one of the red ones that had been restored, but it did not list the shortcomings.

I find them so interesting that I have bought some ads off of eBay, and framed them.  I even owned the Hubley 1/12 scale toys, in both color versions, although I was never sure that the red one I had was originally red, or if it had been a blue one that had been repainted.

Years ago, Blaine, who always posted interesting stories on the Yesterday's Tractor forum, had a picture of what he said was a 6601, which had a manual transmission, setting in a overgrown 'salvage' yard. (I wish I had saved that).

Anyhow, you might say that I can get enough of this series.

So, to keep with the spirit of the thread, here are some old advertisements, and since one of my other fascinations is with cornpickers, I just had to include a couple of them also.  The last picture is one that was for sale at Brady, TX in January of this year.

images (2).jpg

images (4).jpg

626000.jpg

images (3).jpg

images (1).jpg

DSCN3098_2499.JPG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There were a fair amount of ford tractors around. People must have been loyal to them. Neighbors have a blue 2000 ford and a fair share of tw tractors around. Now we have three newer blue ones.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
15 minutes ago, Art From DeLeon said:

I have always been interested in the 6000 series Fords, both the red and gray originals, and the later, improved blue series.

So, to keep with the spirit of the thread, here are some old advertisements, and since one of my other fascinations is with cornpickers, I just had to include a couple of them also

 

 

 

 

 

Art, thanks for those pics and ads for the 6000 Ford. This fellow mentioned he had picked up a couple in Iowa and they had some type of mounting pin up on each side of the front grille casting and I wondered if it was for support arms for some type of row crop equipment. Those were three point, row crop tractors with the wide front axle turned around to the long wheelbase setting. They are headed to the U.K. as well. 

We never saw a lot of the Fords here from that series. Little N series were everywhere as well as quite a few of the bigger Majors. I think that was a British built tractor. Like this one from 1953. 

 

53 Fordson major value.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I wonder if they were called "Majors" in Canada, because I remember them as being Ford "Dextras" when I was a kid.

 

It is kind of a stretch, but I wonder if they evolved into the County series?  (While not a County series as one usually thinks of them, I wonder if the picture of the Ford 8000 was factory, and if so, did any make it to the US?) The Ford farm equipment dealer on the west side of McAllen, TX on old US 83 sold quite a few of the AWD Counties for use as "mudders' in the vegetable fields, and, if you want to bash John Deere, their 'mudder' tractors with the same size tires all around, had to have copied from the UK manufactured Ford Counties.

All wound up and it isn't even 9:30 in the morning, and it is most definitely NOT about politics or the media.

images (5).jpg

ga0317-276689_11.jpg

e5d98267f0f5ccb39a4c76fc803d57fe.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Art, here is another 6000 you've probably seen before. It's sitting right in front of the old Pride refinery on US 277 between Abilene and Hawley. it's a Google pic so it isn't the best. And a question.... who originally built Ford implements like balers and moco's? Has it been New Holland from the start or did someone else build them?

 

ford 6000 hawley, tex.JPG

ford baler.jpg

ford moco.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

We probably should open a new thread if this goes on, so as not to steal Mr. Loadstar's.

I don't think I have seen that, there used to be a very small repair shop on the top of the hill, north of the Valley irrigation place, but your picture is at a different place.

There was kind of a discussion about Ford implements over on The Bash, and LONG seemed to have been involved at least on some of them, and I have heard that Oliver built Ford plows, and Ford's early SP combines, and I also think that Clauss built the later Ford combines.

Again, many years ago, there were about 30 or so blue and white SP combines that set, and set, and set, on the North side of Expressway 83 at Donna, TX., AND the world class junkyard west of Tekamah, NE, on Hiway 32 had a dozen or so more, before the place was sold and cleaned up. And when I say world class, I do mean world class, he had a little bit of everything, and that is just what you could see from the road. (And the state had put up NO PARKING signs all along that section)  And I never drove down the "NO maintainance" road on the west side of the place to see what was in the back, and not visible from the hiway.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
37 minutes ago, Art From DeLeon said:

I wonder if they were called "Majors" in Canada, because I remember them as being Ford "Dextras" when I was a kid.

 

 

 

 

 

Art, I beleive the Dexta was a slightly newer version of the old Fordson Major that I posted. Although they look very similar. 

And Ford haying equipment was very rare (almost non-existent ) here. Almost as rare as this Dearborn combine from 1951. 

51 Ford Dearborn cmbine.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now