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brewcrew

Spreading drywall for fertilizer

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They are done with drywall in our new house, and have a bunch of scraps left. I know that it is gypsum, which is good as a fertilizer, but I am wondering how I should process it? If I could somehow grind it into fines, I could broadcast it with a buggy, but how to grind it? Would it go through the feed mill? Or should I put a couple sheets at a time in the manure spreader (box spreader)? Or maybe try to borrow a slinger from someone? Any help from those who have been there before would be appreciated! Thanks!

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I would think a hay grinder would be the nuts for somthing like that .

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Sheet rock dust will be hard on the bearings on what ever you put it through. It is so fine, it gets into places you didn't know you had places. When our house was built, we threw chunks onto the garden spot. Roto-tilled, disked, etc. In a couple of seasons it was gone. The moisture in the soil keeps the dust down.

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We have a customer who does gypsum recycling here in So. Wi. They sell the product by the processed ton.

He uses a KINGHT 716? slinger spreader as his "processor". He handles large amounts of drywall from commerical construction in Madison, WI. and Chicago, IL.

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On a much smaller scale I have ground up sheet rock with a leaf shredder. Makes it into real fine dust suitable for spreading ((garden). Bigtime dusty operation!

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i used our slinger put a bunch of peices in the bottom and then dumped some manure on top ran it for a bit then opened the door just enough to let it out worked great plus dont get all that dust

Hank

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We've used scrap dry wall for bedding. If you toss chunks into our 8018 Knight slinger they disappear when mixed with sawdust. A local guy used to recycle lots of it with scrap wood when construction was hot and we would buy it for bedding. Great bedding b/c the lime dries out the stalls but calling it dusty dont do it justice! You looked like a KKK member when done and you HAD to wear a mask to breath. Felt bad for the cows so we backed away from it. Weird thing is it would really make you lagoon stink sulfery. A few scraps stomped up and tossed into you speader with poo would be fine though.

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Please help me understand how drywall is a good fertilizer. I have never heard this before, and I'm just wondering if this is some kind of a prank. Truly though, please explain would love learn.

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dry wall has limestone in it. BUT the lime content is so low in drywall that using it for fertilizer is almost laughable... that being said the organic neighbor has done it, just throwing the chunks in with manure spreader with a load of sh*t. rumor is he only did it "one time". :lol::P

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Most of your drywall now is being produced at generating plants they use gypsum and the flyash , which has hi sulfer from the coal they burn . This is part of the scubbing procces for cleaner air emmisions . That is why it smells like sulfer. If you don't have a way of grinding it , maybe you could put it on a slab of concrete and drive your trac. over it at a number of different directions that might do what you need.

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Yeah you aint exactly going to get miraculous yields from it! But bett than paying for the dumpster to take it.

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Please help me understand how drywall is a good fertilizer. I have never heard this before, and I'm just wondering if this is some kind of a prank. Truly though, please explain would love learn.

Dry wall is gypsum sandwiched between paper. Gypsum is hydrated calcium sulphate. The sulfate an oxidized form of sulfur that is readily available as a nutrient for plants. Additionally, gypsum has been used for a variety of other purposes. You can read more: http://www.calciumproducts.com/so4-info.cfm?gclid=CPG8qfSkuK0CFWRjTAodRGrohw

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Yeah, I'm not exactly sure what good it will do, but I know people who actually buy gypsum to put on their fields, and I have this stuff here, so I just as well spread it. I'm gonna borrow a slinger from a neighbor and get it spread, that seems the easiest way to do it. Thanks!

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We finished the basement a few years ago and I was gonna do the same until I read this:

http://forums2.garde...0483023349.html

And I did notice fibers in my drywall...mine was Canadian made, but shortly there after I remember reading about a bunch of houses that pratically needed to be torn down because of some Chinese Drywall had so many chemicals/junk/etc... in it the house was making people sick and virtually a superfund site because of the drywall.

From the web:

Initially, the most common theory was that the drywall was manufactured in gypsum mines in China which used fly ash, a waste material that is a

byproduct from power plants using coal. Samples of Chinese drywall tested by United Engineering, however, consisted of 5-15% organic

material, which contradicts the theory that Chinese drywall was made of waste from coal fired power plants. Some now believe that the tainted

drywall from China comes frommined gypsum, not synthetic gypsum which is made from coal ash. Mined gypsum contains high levels of

strontium, which is visible as inclusions in electron scanning microscopy.

Looks like even American made sheetrock uses synthetic Gypsum, is that OK for use in Fields? http://www.usg.com/documents/corpcom/synthetic-gyp.pdf

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