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New Owner of a TD9 Crawler

IH TD9

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#11 Drott-150

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 08:00 AM

The SN tag and number you posted is that of the loader assembly. The loader frame was built by Drott corp in Wisconsin. As others have mentioned the IH crawler ID plate is down by the kicker panel. It looks like you have a TD9-92 series Drott loader made between about 1959 and 1962. It weighs about 21000 lbs with a GP bucket and counterweight. It is a manual shift transmission (non-powershift) and it is equipped with the direct start, turbocharged, 282 cu-in inline six diesel engine. It puts out somewhere between 66-71 hp at about 1800rpm (depending on turbo boost and injection pump setup). The machine is equipped with dry type steering clutches which can sieze if you leave them sit for a long period of time without use (plates will rust together). It's a strong machine and is capable of a lot of work, I have one very similar to it and have used it for years. The 150 Drott loader superseded the TD-92 series Drott loader in 1963. The manual shift version of the 150 was very similar to the earlier TD9-92. But a powershift transmission was an option on the 150 and that's the main difference between the two machines. There are also changes to the hood profile, the radiator and cooling fan setup, the front grille, the number of upper rollers, the spoked front idlers vs solid and some sheet metal variations. But for the most part the -92's and the TD9B's (150 in loader form) were pretty similar and share a lot of parts.

#12 Drott-150

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 09:11 AM

Err, I was looking,I could be wrong,but isn't that a TD9B? 1965 Model I think. according to these guys anyway http://tractors.wiki...al_TD-9B_series Don't know they're right,but serial number makes it a 44' or a TD9B

IH did sell a TD9B Drott loader in addition to the 150 loader at the same time. The TD9B Drott loader had the dozer chassis instead of the traditional loader chassis of the 150. The 150 track base was longer and used low profile grousers to aid skidding in pivot turns with a lot of weight in the bucket (in contrast to the TD9B's standard high profile dozer grousers). According to sawmill (an old member that used to frequent here with half a century+ of experience), he said the TD9B Drott loaders were popular for use in certain applications because of its increased manueverability due to the shorter track base. I think he said they were good at loading logs onto trucks and freight cars etc. Of course you do give something up by using a dozer chassis, probably less ultimate load capacity and less stability under certain circumstances due to the shorter track base and grousers that don't slip as easily during skid turns.

Anyway, the TD9B Drott loader looks almost identical at first glance to the TD9-92 series Drott loader. But there are certain tell tale signs that makes it easy to tell them apart. The main visual cue is the front radiator grille. The -92's had a pronounced bulge on the lower part of the grille. This was to accommodate the loader's relatively large hydraulic pump protruding forward. The later TD9B's (and 150 loader) had been redesigned so that the pump was fully contained inside the crawler body without the need for a bulge. The older -92's also had a hole in the radiator with the fan shaft going right through it (with the fan spinning in front of the radiator instead of behind it in the TD9B and 150). Pretty interesting when you see a big hole in the radiator and it's actually designed that way. If you look at the side profile picture TD9B2 posted, you can see the lower cowl bump indicative of a -92 series. The spoked front idlers also are peculiar to the -92's (TD9B/150 had solid idlers), although sometimes you'll see these two swapped out between older and newer machines because of parts interchangeability, which can throw off the identifying process if you're not aware of that possibility.

#13 LoggerLee

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 10:17 AM

Thanks for clearing that up for me Drott-150
Now I know a little more than before
:)
1 T20
1 TD14A
3 TD9s
And some TD14 street tracks and chains and sprockets I'd like to sell.

International Harvester crawler group on Facebook http://www.facebook....57096181046179/

#14 Az.Nick

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Posted 01 December 2011 - 11:09 AM

Welcome to RP,
If you look at your photo of the dash you can see the silver i.d. tag just above the left brake pedal and below the throttle. You'll need to perform a dumpster dive to be able to see it. This # will give us the info to provide the year on it. It's a 92 for sure and not a B. The year is good to know and you’ll be able to interchange many parts between 91, 92,150 andthe B's, just make sure you do your research first. As for the start up, you need to make sure your glow plugs are all working (use test light or hold your finger on each plug where the wire connects and feel for heat, as someone presses on the button). The plugs are a must on every first start up (45-60 second hold), no matter what the ambient temp is. I'm in Arizona and the glow plugs are required on summer start-ups, with ambient temp's well over 100 degrees. It's just the nature of this beast! After you reach working temps you should be able to restart without use of the glow plugs, as long as it hasn’t been shut down to long. If its been stored or hasn't been started for a long period, I typically give it about 3 notches on the throttle, turn it over for 2-3 seconds to prime the injectors, then glow plugs for 45 seconds, then fire. This seems to be the trick for Rex. One other important thing before shutting down when it's been worked is to let it idle for a bit and cool. This helps prevent cracking the head, which was more of a common issue on the 4 cylinders and good practice to perform with the 6 cylinders too. What are your plans with this machine and keep the pic’s coming? Good luck and keep us posted on your findings. Nick
1960 TD9 (92) Drott 4&1 & rippers,,,,,,

#15 NewTD9B92

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 07:48 PM

Everyone thanks for the input. I am going out to my land and will get the ID number from the bottom. Here is the front radiator and pump

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  • front radiator.jpg
  • pump.jpg


#16 NewTD9B92

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 07:54 PM

Glow plugs, a picture of a tube between the tracks on the left side, and the radiator

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  • passenger side bottom pipe.jpg
  • raditor.jpg


#17 NewTD9B92

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Posted 02 December 2011 - 08:00 PM

Pic next to my dually

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#18 NewTD9B92

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 03:42 PM

ok went to the land and got the numbers which is below

TD92-1455
1965

So i guess it is a 1965

#19 DWF

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Posted 03 December 2011 - 06:51 PM

According to my info, from the Payline book, it would be a 1959. The 92 series came out in 59 and serial number 501 (which is the norm for IH) was the first and went through 2352 for 1959. By 1965 they were either a 150 loader or a TD9-B.
I had a TD9-92 like yours, SN706 and a TD9-B dozer SN 10855, I believe, I know it was a 1966. The 92 series with a Drott loader is still parked s few miles from here, I don't know why the owner doesn't part with it. It's been sitting out for years, so who knows what it's like now.
DWF

#20 Grabatire

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Posted 04 December 2011 - 12:28 PM

The Serial Plate is no doubt hard to read, but 1965 is the recommended high idle no load engine rpm.
'till later, take care.
Dave