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T Red

How to prevent dry rot tires

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Does anyone know how to prevent tires from dry rotting?

I don't run my road tractor enough to wear out the tires before they dry rot. I just had to replace the fronts due to this. I did find some used tires but they were still expensive. Gator had the same problem had to put tubes in. Lawn mower due soon.

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? use them every month

buy some lubricant from ed miller

keep them covered from sun and air ( travel trailer store)

wear them out before old age sets in

any one have the real answer?

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I'm not sure what "dry rot" is? We get a lot of sunshine out here in western Nebraska and most tractors and equipment sits outside. I've got tires that have to be 50 or 60 years old that are still good.

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When we store grain trailers or other various pieces of equipment we dont use often, we jack them up and place blocks under the frame. This allows the wheels to be suspended in the air and keeps the weight off the tires when not in use. Takes some time to do it but its worth the time spent and by not having to spend the $$$.

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I have tires that are 40+ years old that I use every day. They have alot of cracks and are hard as a rock but work fine. As long as I keep them aired up good they seem to work well. Radials seem to fall apart when they start cracking though.

The tires that I have the best luck with are the old BFGoodrich rice and cain tires. They age really well. I don't know why but they seem to go on forever. I buy them at the salvage yard & tire shop whenever I get a chance (they are cheap also).

Thx-Ace

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The miller suggestion may be the best yet. He sells a protectant for tires. It's pricey though.

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keeping them out of the sun is what has worked for us.....have a 37 f-20 on original rubber and they still hold air but they are tough looking, probably wouldnt work them hard anymore.

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Some sort of tire shine/protectant helps to keep the rubber moist and pliable. I personally use armor all. Also the tip about jacking it up when not in use is great. If you don't park your equipment for long periods (making it unreasonable to jack it up), park it with the tires up on boards, OSB, plywood; some kind of wood. This way the wood will absorb the moisture from the ground and keep it away from the tire rubber. Tires will just inevitably dry out over time if they aren't worn out first but all these suggestions can certainly delay the process.

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General tires don't seem to dry rot,at least vintage lawn tractor sizes don't,i've noticed this for years.They must have a different compound?

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I have noticed that also. We have some old tires that are just fine. It seems the newer tires are not the same compounds as the old.

I have heard of using brake fluid. Any thoughts?

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The best way to store is a dark & dry place.I would not use brake fluid.

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Here is a link to a motorcycle discussion forum. One guy recommends food-grade silicone. There is also a link to an RV article that has some good information. I can't vouch for anything written, but it seems to make sense. The basic enemies of tires are the sun and oxygen. Keeping the sun off them and keeping the air away from the rubber has to help. Tire dealers are using nitrogen to inflate because to reduce the oxygen deterioration. A nitrogen inflated tire almost never needs air, so you know there is a benefit.

http://www.bmwmoa.org/forum/showthread.php?t=25965

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i use tire paint on mine, that or silicone spray... seems to keep them ok in florida sun.

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when I have customers come in with really pre-mature ( like 2 years) dry rot on motorcycle tires they always admit to using armor all.

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I tried the brake fluid. Put it on with a foam paint brush and wiped excess off. Some on a model T forum have used it for years with no adverse affects. Farmall 560 what is your reasoning for not using brake fluid?

I agree about the armor all.

I think the food grade silicone spray may have merit also.

I do keep these tires out of the sunlight. Jacking them up may help prevent cracking at one spot, but is not practical for my use. Plus my tires seem to crack evenly around the sidewall.

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