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Ernest

Self propelled haybines

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Or as some call them windrowers, swathers......

I have been looking for a New Holland for a few years now. I found a local one a 1496 12' thats all I know about it. Is anybody familiar with this machine or can give me any advice on a self propelled haybine.

This thing is a little bigger than I want but finding an older 7' is next to impossible (that runs)

Price is $4000 If good shape I don't think it is bad. Compaired to a pull type.

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They're more maintanance than they're worth IMO..............I also definitely would NEVER buy a 7 ft haybine..............

Take that 4 grand and buy a later model 9ft NH Haybine, or step up to the plate and look at a NH or NI discbine.

Why would you want another engine/powertrain to worry about on a part-time operation?

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They're more maintanance than they're worth IMO..............I also definitely would NEVER buy a 7 ft haybine..............

Take that 4 grand and buy a later model 9ft NH Haybine, or step up to the plate and look at a NH or NI discbine.

Why would you want another engine/powertrain to worry about on a part-time operation?

A good discbine for the money that ain't shot is hard to find. The ones I have found the disc (rotor's?) are shot.

Another engine and powertrain don't worry me. I have heard about the maintnence end of them being high maintnence but never been around them.

I like them because it is 1 machine. It's like saying any tractor can run it ;) Just hop in and go. Narrow roads and farm lanes, no offset to hit and catch trees, no twisted neck from looking back all day. These would be my pros. Cons would be they are rare, set kind of high for hills, belt drive.

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A good discbine for the money that ain't shot is hard to find.  The ones I have found the disc (rotor's?) are shot.

I like them because it is 1 machine. It's like saying any tractor can run it ;)  Just hop in and go. Narrow roads and farm lanes, no offset to hit and catch trees, no twisted neck from looking back all day. These would be my pros. Cons would be they are rare, set kind of high for hills, belt drive.

Did you every deal with Junior Fry up here by me? You could get a decent NH 488 that is ready to go for way under that $4K. He probably could even get you a decent NH 411(I think is the model #) discbine for that price.

I'd go with a NH 488 or 489..........Every tractor you got could run it except the H...........

My question is, if you currently running a sickle bar now and getting the job done, do you honestly need a SP with a 12' cut? And the things you mention above as a pro for a SP sorta makes no sense............#1, if you can catch trees with a haybine you shouldn't be running the tractor #2, Our NH 489 was barely wider than the tractor with the tonge swung over...........Alot easier to manuever down lanes than what a 12ft cut SP will be #3. Like I said, your running a sickle bar and getting hay in........A Hay or Discbine will increase the speed greatly inwhich you can mow, so I highly doubt sitting sideways in the seat watching a haybine will cause your neck to hurt as your probably going to run out of stuff to mow before that happens.

Come down to Fraley's Consignment sale this fall or next spring and you'll be able to pull a Discbine or a very nice haybine home for what you'll have in that SP.

Its your money, I'd certainly look into this issue alot more before I threw it out the window and then come to regret it.

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I have always like self propelled equipment. That is just my preference. But I would not mind a pull type sickle or disc. I spent many hours on paps IH 544 and 479 NH haybine very nice set up, no plugging, no skipping. I have seen the 411 NH discbines go cheap but then I was not at the sale. TP just let me know when the sale is and I will try and attend.

Sometimes I just get to the point where I get tyred of OLD WORN OUT equipment, that I can't find parts for. In no way mean I dis-like old equipment, Just I get tyred of scrounging around for parts and fixing equipment that is needed to be reliable on a daily basis. Especially hay equipment when you have a narrow window to make it (sometimes). We had an 816 IH mower conditioner, and an IH #2A hay conditioner. Both parts NLA and just don't work right.

THANKS!

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TP just let me know when the sale is and I will try and attend.

go to www.fraleyauction.com...............They have sale bills for everything.

I understand your arguement about downtime, but I always had the belief that another engine/drivetrain/and other components.........Although newer, doesn't mean less maintanance/downtime.

We had a very well cared for NH 489, although the sloppy paint job by the previous owner would have you think otherwise.............I don't think we had more than a few minutes downtime in 2 seasons and that down time was for a broken sickle.

One thing about a Discbine though should you go that route.................They take some HP on the PTO shaft compared to a haybine. ;)

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Worst thing I recall about the self propelleds was they got stuck easy. Ran one for a neighbor a couple of summers when I was a teen in high school, and if the ground was even wet with a dew you did some spinning. :( Hopefully the newer ones go better than that late sixties vintage Hesston did. :(

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Run away from self propelled if you are only doing a small amount of hay. I thought this was the way to go years ago and so I talked myself into an International 4000 with the crimping rollers for doing hay and what a mistake. It had a 10 ft head on it. The power train was very good but I slipped the hydrostat belt and was down for two days waiting for a belt so I had to borrow the neighbours haybine, if you have a problem with a tractor all you need to do is switch tractors. Also, a 12' cut versus a 9' cut will play havoc on you if you do not have large capacity baler, rake etc. An extra 3' of hay in the windrow will come back to haunt you trying to get it dry with standard haying equipment, especially when baling. Take it for what it's worth but I traded my 4000 back in for a 488 New Holland and 6 years later I'm still cutting hay with the NH and like pulling it with the 756. On another note the cutterbar I believe is a center drive similar to the 499 that MOChad uses and I know that they are a bugger for parts. My .02.

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neighbor i help traded off a case ih self propelled sycle cutter for the first case ih 8312 . a dics cutter would be a step up if you ever get where you can get one ,im going to a disc cutter as soon as i can ,but you need 100 h.p. min on a 12 foot disc.

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Run away from self propelled if you are only doing a small amount of hay. I thought this was the way to go years ago and so I talked myself into an International 4000 with the crimping rollers for doing hay and what a mistake. It had a 10 ft head on it. The power train was very good but I slipped the hydrostat belt and was down for two days waiting for a belt so I had to borrow the neighbours haybine, if you have a problem with a tractor all you need to do is switch tractors. Also, a 12' cut versus a 9' cut will play havoc on you if you do not have large capacity baler, rake etc. An extra 3' of hay in the windrow will come back to haunt you trying to get it dry with standard haying equipment, especially when baling. Take it for what it's worth but I traded my 4000 back in for a 488 New Holland and 6 years later I'm still cutting hay with the NH and like pulling it with the 756. On another note the cutterbar I believe is a center drive similar to the 499 that MOChad uses and I know that they are a bugger for parts. My .02.

You are correct. That is the same head that a 499 haybine uses. I'd probably tend to stay away from it, I'm getting pretty tired of fixing on ours all the time. Also getting tired of all the special parts that nobody has and NH won't stock.

Neighbors have a 1499? NH selfpropelled, and it seem like it is down more than not sometimes. It's got a hydrostat pump out of it as we speak. About 3k. Already put in both the motors for about the same money. It really cuts when it's cutting, but when it ain't the dollars sure go the other way fast. If I wasn't doing many acres a good used 411 would be my choice.

Chads

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Or as some call them windrowers, swathers......

I have been looking for a New Holland for a few years now. I found a local one a 1496 12' thats all I know about it. Is anybody familiar with this machine or can give me any advice on a self propelled haybine.

This thing is a little bigger than I want but finding an older 7' is next to impossible (that runs)

Price is $4000 If good shape I don't think it is bad. Compaired to a pull type.

I run two self propelled haybines Our first one is a NH 1495 12' we bought at an auction in the late 80's with low hours and the second one we bought 3 years ago is a Hesston 8200. If they were cared for and stored inside they can be a trouble free machines other then normal wear parts. Our main reason for buying them was price we have less money in both than one new 12' discbine would have cost today No one wants a used SP around here.I really dont' know how anyone can pay 40 to 50 grand for a machine and run it 500 to 1000 hours and make out. We paid 11500 for the Hesston with 1000 hours on it the only thing it needed was a new sciklebar and gaurds. You can't even buy a new 9' pull type for that. When I bought the Hesston the NH1495 need new rolls and the reel rebuilt the dealer didn't want it. So I keep it and the next winter rebuilt the head I had less then 2 grand in the rebuild. and now have two good machines. With both in the field at the same time cutting you can really knock some hay down quick. We have never had any trouble with the motors or hydros. They are like anything else if you change your oils and filter you will get years of trouble free use.

Wayne

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Run away from self propelled if you are only doing a small amount of hay. I thought this was the way to go years ago and so I talked myself into an International 4000 with the crimping rollers for doing hay and what a mistake. It had a 10 ft head on it. The power train was very good but I slipped the hydrostat belt and was down for two days waiting for a belt so I had to borrow the neighbours haybine, if you have a problem with a tractor all you need to do is switch tractors. Also, a 12' cut versus a 9' cut will play havoc on you if you do not have large capacity baler, rake etc. An extra 3' of hay in the windrow will come back to haunt you trying to get it dry with standard haying equipment, especially when baling. Take it for what it's worth but I traded my 4000 back in for a 488 New Holland and 6 years later I'm still cutting hay with the NH and like pulling it with the 756. On another note the cutterbar I believe is a center drive similar to the 499 that MOChad uses and I know that they are a bugger for parts. My .02.

i have a 1469 nh self propelled haybine. handiest little sob. good rolls runs well and gave 1800 dollars for it.

You are correct. That is the same head that a 499 haybine uses. I'd probably tend to stay away from it, I'm getting pretty tired of fixing on ours all the time. Also getting tired of all the special parts that nobody has and NH won't stock.

Neighbors have a 1499? NH selfpropelled, and it seem like it is down more than not sometimes. It's got a hydrostat pump out of it as we speak. About 3k. Already put in both the motors for about the same money. It really cuts when it's cutting, but when it ain't the dollars sure go the other way fast. If I wasn't doing many acres a good used 411 would be my choice.

Chads

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Thanks for all the input guys. As always I am undecided as of now. What will probably happen is I will probably get a pull type haybine. Last fall I passed on an excellent 7' IH 990 for $1200 The guy who bought it wanted to sell me his OLD worn out 9' one for $800. Na!

Then last summer their was an add in the paper FREE hesston (PT10?) looked at it all their and very good shape (kids inherited the farm and got rid of stuff) I was #3 on the list of takers. I told them I would give them $200 and haul it away now. "sorry we promised it to an old man so he could use his old one for parts" Could not bargain with him. Oh well!

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Then last summer their was an add in the paper FREE hesston (PT10?)

Count your blessing that you didn't get it..................My grandfather has one and when he got it, it was like new..........They've worked on the stupid thing more than it was in the field. Then when they need parts, they get the dreaded NLA from the Hesston dealer, THEN the salvage yard by me tells them, "Yeah we got 7 or so of them, but all of them already had that part taken off"............So, grandson ends up making what they need :(

To top it off, Our 489 NH would have out cut it WHEN they did get it to the field. And we mowed more hay in two cuttings than they did all season all the only down time we had was when I broke a sickle tooth, AND I didn't have to MACHINE any parts for ours ;):D

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Then last summer their was an add in the paper FREE hesston (PT10?)

Count your blessing that you didn't get it..................My grandfather has one and when he got it, it was like new..........They've worked on the stupid thing more than it was in the field. Then when they need parts, they get the dreaded NLA from the Hesston dealer, THEN the salvage yard by me tells them, "Yeah we got 7 or so of them, but all of them already had that part taken off"............So, grandson ends up making what they need :(

To top it off, Our 489 NH would have out cut it WHEN they did get it to the field. And we mowed more hay in two cuttings than they did all season all the only down time we had was when I broke a sickle tooth, AND I didn't have to MACHINE any parts for ours ;):D

Got to agree with you TP, the PT10 was the biggest piece of junk Hesston ever built. Neighbors had one and they would have to fix it about every third round in the field. They Finally got rid of it and bought a IH.

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Really! I am shocked. I was told by a dealer ( :blink: ) :lol: that all of hesstons were good. But that's what happens when you listen to a dealer!

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I have a PT10 that I got for $100. Needed gaurds and teeth. I have yet to figure out how to get it set up correctly. Clogs quite easily. I haven't had any problems with it (YET [knocking on wood right now!]). Sure is a noisy mother fletcher....have to wear ear-plugs.

Only thing I've heard about SP's is don't get a belt drive (Owatana). Gerneral rule of thumb: if it's got t!ts or tires, it's going to be trouble. (Sorry Juliet...you can substitute "testicles" and it would still be true)

Mark

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Got to agree with you TP, the PT10 was the biggest piece of junk Hesston ever built. Neighbors had one and they would have to fix it about every third round in the field. They Finally got rid of it and bought a IH.

I know guys though that have had great luck with the PT-7's, My grandfather is the only one I know of with a 10, either way, I get plenty of machine work from it. Most of the stuff I have to make him you think you could still get from the dealer, but he seems they give him the NLA look before he's even in the door at two Hesston dealers he deals with.

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