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wildfarm

What size Disc chisel for a 986

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I am looking to go to a disc chisel. Right now I have a 7 shank 3 point mount one and you cant even tell your pulling it. Also my tractor is turbo charged pushing 185 hp at the pto so I was wonder if I should look for a 7 shank or a 9 shank. I know it would pull a 9 shank but with that much horsepower would i rip the rear end or not? Any help would be appreciated Thanks in advance

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it took a healthy 1566 with a lot of weight on it to yank a 9 shank IH 6500 at any kind of reasonable speed here in my area.

if you weight a 986 down to use all the 185 hp you claim, you will certainly tear the rear end up. especially if you have duals. There is a reason they werent 185 hp tractors from the factory, my friend.

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7 shank

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I agree with Jason. We're pulling a 7 shank Sunflower disc chisel with a 1566 that was 196 at the PTO. We've got 1800 lbs of wheel weights in the duals and 1000 lbs on the front. Granted we work some hill ground so we need a little power reserve, but it knows it's back there. Using a soil probe we can get down to 14" when traction will start becoming an issue again. We stayed with a 7 so that if we need to work really deep we've got plenty of tractor to do it and not have to start cheating the depth on the plow to keep moving. Just my thoughts.

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Probably should look for a new rear end for the 986 just as soon as you sign the check on the chisel.

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I was thinking only going for a 7 shank I found one at a good price but they have a 9 shank thats a little cheaper. And we pull a 9 shank with are 1456 and it pulls it fine in High first and that has 150 hp. That only has 900 pounds of weight on back with no fluid and then 600 pounds up front and where running duals on it also. I wasnt really happy when I dynoed the 986 and it had a 185hp I figured that would be more than what that rear end could handle. And I am trying to locate a heavier rear end for it when this one takes a crap or could you put the heavier gears and axles on this rear end housing?

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it took a healthy 1566 with a lot of weight on it to yank a 9 shank IH 6500 at any kind of reasonable speed here in my area.

.

We pulled a 9 shank 6500 with a 7120, then a 7220 2wd. It wasn't till we bought a 7240mfd that I thought we pulled the 6500 like it should be.

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Boog, I totally buy your statement, especially with your heavier dirt. Most of the time we had plenty of power but traction was an issue... and when it wasnt an issue we tore the rear end up.

I have a 13 shank JD now that I am going to narrow up to 11 shanks for my 7140....and even it might get traded for a 9 shank....

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I should mention that where we are pulling the 9 shank is at the main farm that is owned with my dad in uncle and it is used on river bottom land that doesnt pull hard and in places is sandy but also sees heavier clay ground but then we try to use the 1486. I am trying to break away and start my own farm and I have heavier clay ground and if I had the funds I would buy a bigger tractor but I am limited on what I can spend. Also I only have 30 arces of ground that I would have to chisel the rest of it is hay ground. So I am wondering what would work best with what I have now and if I get chance and have the funds I plan on getting a bigger tractor but starting out on your own isn't the easiest to do these days especially when your 21.

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I was thinking only going for a 7 shank I found one at a good price but they have a 9 shank thats a little cheaper. And we pull a 9 shank with are 1456 and it pulls it fine in High first and that has 150 hp. That only has 900 pounds of weight on back with no fluid and then 600 pounds up front and where running duals on it also. I wasnt really happy when I dynoed the 986 and it had a 185hp I figured that would be more than what that rear end could handle. And I am trying to locate a heavier rear end for it when this one takes a crap or could you put the heavier gears and axles on this rear end housing?

Where in ne Iowa you at? I am in Floyd county between Rudd & Rockford & there is no way I could pull my 9 shank in high first with the 1466 or the 1256. Course it depends the the size shanks you are planning on running. I have 4" twisted shanks on it but only run in L 3rd with the 14 & L4th with the 12, but I am running at least 10-12" in real heavy black dirt. They will pull it faster but why tear stuff up!

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Heck, only 30 acres.............By the time your done busting up the tractor, you'd be further ahead to plow it :lol: Even with only 4-16's it wouldn't take long to knock 30 acres out.

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I am in allamakee county and like I said we got nice loose black dirt and some of the fields are sandy so it pulls fairly easy and its flat but when we get up in the hills on the clay we will run in low 4. We also have 4 in twisted shanks and we have a glenco soil saver. And I know soil condition have a major effect on how things pull and how deep each tractor can pull it. I am not saying that My tractors will pull it everywhere in them gears all I am saying is that is what we can do around here. And this is being a big help on the decision of what I will buy for my own farm that is heavier clay soil. And it sounds like some of you are taking offense to what I say we can pull around here and I am sorry if you took it that way I didn't mean it like that.

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Tearing up your tractor is not going to get you farther ahead .

Id rather work the tractor easy and spend a little longer in the field .

Tommy

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I don't like the idea of moldboard plowing since my personal farm is hillside crop ground and not bottom land like the one that I farm with my dad. And I want a chisel plow because I plan on expanding my operation sometime in the future and all the land around it is all hillside also.

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I have no plans on tearing up my tractor I bought it for baling hay so it having a turbo wasnt a big deal then but now that I am in the position to use it for tillage work I am trying to figure what is the best to pull behind it with out tearing it up. But am not getting too many replies on telling me that.

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Plus I am not worried about getting done in a hurry I just want something that will do a decent job but still leave some residue on the ground. So its not bare soil until the corn pops up.

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I have a 7 shank glenco soil saver that I pull with a 1086 or 5088. I run out of traction before power but I don't have duals, 4" twisted shovels I do not think I could do a decent job with anything bigger.

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Anybody know if a 5 shank does a good job I've only seen a few of them and never been around them. I've only known people that have a 9 or 7 shank. And only personally used a 9 shank. That is why I asked about pulling them.

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A five shank will do just fine, and you won't tear up your rear end. Then when funds allow for a bigger tractor, get a bigger chisel. You have enough hp to pull bigger, but you also have enough to tear things up real bad. I wouldn't get a bigger rear or bigger parts, just a bigger tractor. If you check the Dubuque craigslist there is a 1586 with a 4-post ROPS cheap.... Just sayin'. ;)

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Yes I have seen that and done alot of thinking on it but I would rather wait and buy a 50 or 5288. We have a 5488 here on the main farm that I really like. I would just use that but they don't like me using equipment that is mine only on my own farm since I am trying to go out on my own in case it breaks. And I understand why. Also anybody know what brands of disc chisels do the best job?

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Yes I have seen that and done alot of thinking on it but I would rather wait and buy a 50 or 5288. We have a 5488 here on the main farm that I really like. I would just use that but they don't like me using equipment that is mine only on my own farm since I am trying to go out on my own in case it breaks. And I understand why. Also anybody know what brands of disc chisels do the best job?

Number 1 priority IMO when buying a disc chiesel is a 3 bar over a 2 bar. 3 bar will give better trash flow & not as much plugging. I owned a 9 shank CIH 6500. We had some plugging problems with it until I changed the shank & shovel arrangement to how a Glenco was settup which made a huge difference. At the time we were probably averaging 175 - 180 bu corn with instances of 200+. Only time we disced the stalks ahead of the disc chiesel was COC. Neighbor had a 3 bar JD disc chiesel & had to disc everything & still had problems. Another neighbor had a Glenco & it always seemed to do a decent job. Krause would be another one I would look at.

One thing to check if you go with a 6500 is too look at the rockshaft. The earlier ones didn't have grease zerks on the bottom side & grease wouldn't travel around from the zerk on top resulting in failure of the U mounting bracket. Rockshaft would also bind & twist because of lack of grease on the bottom side. Had it happen once on our 6500. I drilled the bottom U brackets & put grease zerks in like it should have been done & didn't have anymore problems. WE also had problems with the front disc gang bearing flanges breaking off where they bolted to the standard. I feel this was due from running on an angle to the rows, you could see the disc gang work side to side as you went thru the field. We found a heavier flanged Fafner bearing at a local bearing shop & once we switched to them stopped breaking the flanges.

Overall, I'd rate the 6500 as one of the better disc chiesels for it's time period. We ran a Unverferth danish time leveler on the back of ours with a single bar spike harrow on the leveler. It did a nice job of leveling the ground in the fall. In the spring it was level enough that we sprayed our preemerge without working the ground ahead of the sprayer saving a tillage trip.

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are you planting corn on corn? if so ya i can see you want to chisel it but otherwise notill it if your soils are as loose as you say.

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I guess i should explain why we beat you up so much ....:).Those of us that have been around the IH tractors ,Have seen it many times -.

Some tractor gets turned up to double its stock power ,and the thing is pulled to death -Then when the tractor dies ,everyone says the "IH tractors are junk".

Dont think we will beat you up every time .

Tommy

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Don't consider it getting beat up, take it as good advice from those that have been around the block a few times.

I would look for a Krause or Sunflower as my first choices, Glencoe and Brillion are also good chisels. The IH 6500 is ok if you do the modifications that Boog said above, otherwise I would stay away, we have a 9 shank and we are constantly fixing on it. Deeres dont handle trash very well, unless you go with a newer one whick is probably out of your price range. The older DMI's are also decent chisels for the money.

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