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Ernest

Best older combine for?????

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Grains! Meaning sunflower, sorghum, corn, millet, oats, rye, wheat, Safflower, buckwheat.

Looking for the older machines from the 1960's 1970's and 1980's due to price. If I win the lotto I will be buying new, Ha Ha Ha! For corn I can get a picker or sheller. My knowledge is limited to wheat, rye, oats, buckwheat, sorghum, and corn. Never grew millet, sunflower, and safflower and wondered if the combines had special attachments or it takes a special machine?

Thanks

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How much ground do you need to cover?

Since you're looking at an older machine, I would stick with whatever has the best dealer support in your area, as you will most likely be needing parts and/or service at some time or another.

If you're planning on shelling the corn right out of the field, I would just stick with the combine for that, too. Easy just to change heads, adjust some settings, and go. No need to tie up a tractor or maintain a separate machine. If you're putting up ear corn, however, that is a different story.

I see you're interested in Farmalls and Internationals. The 15 series of combines (615,715,815,915) were good machines, getting a little long in the tooth, but could probably be made to work for smaller acreages. I liked them over the Deeres of the time because they had the engine in back, not sitting right next to you; made for a quieter, cooler ride and made the engine more accessible to work on.

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Ernest, Chad B from IHRegistry here. Depending on your acreage I would say anything from a 715 up to a 1440. If'n you wanna stay with IH, CB Hoobers is just over the valley from ya. I don't see anything smaller on their site at the moment but they treat us well with our needs on everything. They might know of a unit coming in that they could give you a heads up on.

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Same basic question. Going to need a combine in about 2 years to do corn wheat and beans on 20 to 40 acres a year.

Rick

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Get a used 1400 series Axial Flow. They have many more parts offered yet compared to the X15 series. And......if you ever want to "upgrade" there are dozens (literally) of improvement kits CIH offers to make it like a new one. The adjustments are simple and its easy to drive.

We (C&G) just sold a near mint condition 1620 Axial Flow trade-in to a farmer in PA. Sometimes you need to look all over to find one that fits you.

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Might as well say what I want to do! One thing I have always been interested in doing is making/growing bird seed. So one day I will get to buy a combine and experiment with this venture. I do not need anything with a 20' head because I would be fiddling with 1-5 acres of each crop. I know this may sound odd that is why I am curious about different combines and their harvesting capabilities. Since I would run 1 acre of lets say sorghum/milo, then switch to millet for 3 acres, then to sunflower for 5 acres then maybe 20 acres of corn? I don't want something that will take a week to set up and or tear half the machine apart to change out screens and or the concave and cylinder? I have been leaning to the older IH rotaries but my combine knowledge is pretty limited to the pull type John Deere 30.

And in the end if this would fail then I shall have a combine to do some custom work with! ;)

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We (C&G) sold a 2366 Axial Flow several years ago to a company that raises "weeds". They actually grow prairie grass varieties for roadside restorations and large land re-developments. It harvests all kinds of plants as they reach maturity from May thru November.

The biggest reason they went with an Axial Flow is that it is easy to clean out when changing from 1 plant variety to another. Several seed corn companies run Axial Flows because of this feature too.

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Sounds like a tow behind All Crop 72 would do what you want. I have harvested milo with mine before. it is not fast, but does good job and is cheap.

Check out Tom Yaz's site. He has started remanufacturing them for small specialty producers and has most parts available:

http://www.yazallcrop.com/#

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IMO, a 1440 / 1460 would be the ideal combine for what you want though maybe a little oversized for your operation but you could always "grow" into it. Lots of them were sold & they still have good parts availability and there's a ton of updates available for them as KB said. 1420 would be good also but there weren't as many sold & they don't have the parts availability that the 40/60s have. a 715 would be another good combine but again, as someone previously stated, they're getting long in the tooth and parts availabilty isn't near as good as the 40/60s. Lots of parts you'll have to scrounge at a salvage yard. Personally, I'd stay away from an 815, bad reputation from the get go and any 9 you find will probably had a hard life as they were the "big daddy" in their day & were bought mainly by the large farmers of the time.

JM2ยข

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Might as well say what I want to do! One thing I have always been interested in doing is making/growing bird seed. So one day I will get to buy a combine and experiment with this venture. I do not need anything with a 20' head because I would be fiddling with 1-5 acres of each crop. I know this may sound odd that is why I am curious about different combines and their harvesting capabilities. Since I would run 1 acre of lets say sorghum/milo, then switch to millet for 3 acres, then to sunflower for 5 acres then maybe 20 acres of corn? I don't want something that will take a week to set up and or tear half the machine apart to change out screens and or the concave and cylinder? I have been leaning to the older IH rotaries but my combine knowledge is pretty limited to the pull type John Deere 30.

And in the end if this would fail then I shall have a combine to do some custom work with! wink.gif

For the small patches you're going to combine, maybe if you could find another JD 30, or IH 80 or 82, the pull-type would be the way to go. Or like RAWLEIGH99 says, an Allis 72 All-Crop would be good too.

Dad pushed 30 to 40 acres of oats thru a JD #30 every year the last 5-6 yrs he farmed without much problem. He had two #62 IH's, so he had at least one spare for every part that would break. Scrapped them when he bought a JD #25, which he only ran a few years, still hated the canvases. Then this #30 came up for sale by the salesman at the local JD dealer who farmed with his son about 3-4 miles away. We towed it right out of his machine shed one evening and started combining the next afternoon with it.

Not sure what spare part availability on a small JD or IH pull type would be anymore, suspect it wouldn't be good.

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Thanks for the input so far. You all have given me some insight to where to start looking!

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Something without augers in the grain tank so cleanout is simpler

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I still would lean towards a 1400 series Axial Flow. They can be bought fairly cheap anymore and like Ken said the parts and the update kits are all readily available. If you would go that route especially since you say you're leaning that way and if you find one locally you might also consider having someone like CB's do an uptime inspection on it before buying it. We considered buying what from the outside appeared to be a very well maintained machine once at an auction VERY close to home before we bought the one we have now, (which ended up coming out of west virginia). At the time 1440's were still selling for around 25-30,000 for a base machine. We decided to have CB's perform an uptime inspection on the combine and found out it had MAJOR problems and needed around 12,000 dollars worth of repairs to be a reliable machine. At auction the machine sold for WAY over what it was worth and we were glad we had them do it. It was the best $600.00 we could have spent. From what you propose to do it may not be worth having done, just something to think about though.

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Like the others I would look for a 1440/1460, simple machines with lots of parts availability and can be bought reasonable. I wouldnt rule out a green one either 4400, 6600, either, they are good machines a well. Biggest thing is what you have for dealer support as you will need parts, combines are a maintaince intensive machine and would get old if you had to run 100 miles for parts every day. What are you neighbors running? being new to a combine having people around that know the machines can come in awful handy in setting and repairs.

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maybe you should look into farmall doctor's 915 that he was talking about selling. that one sounded like a well cared for machine.

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With a computer and a telephone you can find just about anything these days. You can do alot of ac per day with a 715, but to a point not three or four hunderd acres. Just to many hours of run time.

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I wanted a pull combine for my few acres of stuff, but the pull ones with an auger feed are hard to come buy, plus the collectors are grabbing them up. I got an old gleaner A2 cheap, last fall I found a 3 row corn head for it. Biggest reason I got a gleaner is I have Sandy Lake Imp 3 miles from the house and they sold AC stuff. The bone yard makes parts shopping alot more reasonable also. At this point in the game I figure if it pukes an engine I load it on the gooseneck and haul it in for scrap and I won't have lost any thing. Good luck with your shopping.

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I wanted a pull combine for my few acres of stuff, but the pull ones with an auger feed are hard to come buy, plus the collectors are grabbing them up. I got an old gleaner A2 cheap, last fall I found a 3 row corn head for it. Biggest reason I got a gleaner is I have Sandy Lake Imp 3 miles from the house and they sold AC stuff. The bone yard makes parts shopping alot more reasonable also. At this point in the game I figure if it pukes an engine I load it on the gooseneck and haul it in for scrap and I won't have lost any thing. Good luck with your shopping.

For what you want to do I think you would be happy with a IH or a Gleaner. I own both, and the Gleaners are a great small acreage machine. If you do get a Gleaner keep Sandy Lakes number handy. They are super people to deal with- very knowledgeable about conventional Gleaners and they still have alot of parts for them. They have been great at getting parts for my F2.

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I would go with a 1440 or a 1460 but if you want to go older the 715 Diesel is the best choice.

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Depends on your how many acres you plan to do. I worked at an Aliis dealer 6 years and grew to love Gleaner conventionals even though I bled red as anyone. You can't go wrong with one IMHO becuase they are sooooo easy to work on and nice to operate although they are built a little on the light side and if they have been sitting outside for years get ready to get good at changing bearings :wacko: K, K2 ,F,L in all 3 series are great choices the newer the better. Nothing wrong with the others just they are older. A "G" with a 350 Chev sure barks nice B)

And theres only one rotary to consider if you go that route and it ain't galvinized its Red B):D

For all the vintage green lovers............I made this video at last years John Deere Heritage Days near where I live ,Its a show put on by the First 2 Cylinder Club of Ontario at a different farm each year. No admission etc and WHAT A SHOW !

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Nice video would like to red ones like that in a line.

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it would be sweet to see a bunch of Red Ones. That John Deere club really put on a great show.They move it to a different farm every year

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For a small operation and a older machine, a good 403 or 715 would be hard to beat. They are reliable and fairly simple to work on and operator friendly. The only drawback would be parts are sometimes hard to find due to age.

Harold H

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in the middle 70.s guy did our work had a f -2 gleaner 4-row head sure was a nice machine 15 grain head too

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