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cm228

Massey Ferguson # 12 Baler

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Good Evening

I 've got a question for anyone who has owned or did own or worked on a massey ferguson 12 baler. I am trying to figure out why ours will not make bales consistently. What I mean is this baler we have will not make a bale that's the same everytime. One will be nice and tight good weight and the next will loose and floppy & light . Also never seems to make the bales the same length, I try to keep the hay feeding the baler with as much as it will take ( with out knocking the shear bolt off) It doesn't seam to matter though no matter what the crop flow. Also the inboard twine run always seams to be just slightly longer than the outside run making the bale crooked, which make the bales prone to popping open when they land in the kick wagon. This machine has been this way as long as I can remember. Maybe I'm asking to much of an inferior machine. I guess I got spoiled a few summers ago when I borrowed a neighbors NH 570 after blowing the pto shaft apart on the 12 in wheat straw. That 570 made nice tight bales from the first to the last no matter the crop flow.

Thanks

Matt

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Good Evening

I 've got a question for anyone who has owned or did own or worked on a massey ferguson 12 baler. I am trying to figure out why ours will not make bales consistently. What I mean is this baler we have will not make a bale that's the same everytime. One will be nice and tight good weight and the next will loose and floppy & light . Also never seems to make the bales the same length, I try to keep the hay feeding the baler with as much as it will take ( with out knocking the shear bolt off) It doesn't seam to matter though no matter what the crop flow. Also the inboard twine run always seams to be just slightly longer than the outside run making the bale crooked, which make the bales prone to popping open when they land in the kick wagon. This machine has been this way as long as I can remember. Maybe I'm asking to much of an inferior machine. I guess I got spoiled a few summers ago when I borrowed a neighbors NH 570 after blowing the pto shaft apart on the 12 in wheat straw. That 570 made nice tight bales from the first to the last no matter the crop flow.

Thanks

Matt

Ive got a super worn out JD 336. Got to looking and the steel on the bale chamber was very thin (from wear) and would let it flex. It was mostly on top where the wire ties deals are. Some would tie good, others not. Top would flex and when needles come up sometime it would catch others not. Reinforced and that helped. Still makes "bananna" bales from time to time. Messed with restrictor deals on the side. Kinda wonder if it isn't weak there to and don't keep enough tension on the sides to pack consistently. It was cheap and I got what I paid for. Don't use it enough to justify something better I guess. Or not yet anyway.

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I've got a Massey 120 which I"m guessing might be a newer version of the #12. I've never been satisfied with the bale quality of this machine. The old worn out NH 270 generally made a better bale. This Massey produces banana bales but they are turned upwards, not sideways in the usual style. I've tried various ideas but can't seem to get away from the upward curve of these bales.

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Does it have hay dogs in the chamber? Is it possible one side is missing some "bite" and allowing the bale to get longer on one side?

Do you have the tension cranks even? Perhaps tightening down one side more so than the other with help in the case of the machine being worn?

Even consistent windrows are needed, you have the right idea on keeping the baler full. Our #9 makes the best bales (not banana or light) when kept full and about 16-18 strokes a bale. Get into uneven windrows and you can get the light/heavy bale thing going on. Bale length is directly controlled by the amount of hay per packer charge, light charge won't force the star wheel as far along as a heavy charge.

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On my 12, inconsistent length was due to not enough clearance when the trip arm resets. There should be 1/4" as it drops. Loosen the star wheel axle to adjust.

Crooked bales side-to-side may be the packer finger stroke. There are three adjustment holes in the linkage. I run mine in the middle. Moving to the hole toward the pick-up make it pack farther to the flywheel side; moving away from the pick-up makes the hay pack shallower.

Bale dogs are definitely suspect as 495man stated.

Mark

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my neighbour had one it burn't up on him thou

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Check the axle of the star wheel too, most balers have a knurl in the wheel that raises the arm, the knurl wears off and the arm raises intermittently as well. The star wheel should travel exactly the same distance for each bale so the arm must be moving in relation to the star wheel. Have someone else drive and walk along and watch the arm, I bet you will see it drop at times and produce a giant bale, or pop up and produce a short one. As for banana bales, I think that happens because infeed is not consistent across the width of the plunger, usually because the mechanism doesn't protrude far enough into the chamber or too far.

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I bought an old MF 12 last year, I made nearly 50 "practice bales" before I had the knotters working as they should. I did not make many adjustments, Mainly the knotters needed to be well lubricated and polished of any rust to work properly. In addition to what was mentioned above, check the clearance and sharpness of your chamber/plunger knife. My knife was dull and I found the baler would struggle to shear the hay when in heavy feed, this caused the inboard to have more material and be slightly bananna shaped. check to see how the inboard side of the bale appears, if it is looks cleanly cut then this is not your problem, if it is rough and material is bent over and sticking out, then it might be the problem.

I highly suggest getting a manual for the baler, they are very detailed about setting/adjusting/troubleshooting the knotters. I got mine off Ebay for next to nothing.

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