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41M

IHC's contribution to the WWII war effort

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What did IHC produce during WWII that was directly involved in the war effort? Anything?

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In addition to the tanks, rifles, jeeps, machine guns and large guns the chairman of the board went to Washington and helped run the war effort. IH started the first ever scrap metal drive at the dealerships. IH was a large great company with talent and resources that were awesome. Ken Ryan

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Jeez goob, way to copy and paste, then change JD out for IHC. Just like John Deere, See somthing you like and copy it to suit your needs.

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Jeez goob, way to copy and paste, then change JD out for IHC. Just like John Deere, See somthing you like and copy it to suit your needs.

my thought exactly

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Jeez goob, way to copy and paste, then change JD out for IHC. Just like John Deere, See somthing you like and copy it to suit your needs.

my thought exactly

Did ole 41M make a big blow about mother deere's hard work in the war effort on the bashin board, then turn around to see if ole IHC contributed at all?

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What about other's MM, MF, Deere, Oliver, and so on?

World War II

The onset of World War II greatly affected equipment manufacturers such as John Deere. After the attack on Pearl Harbor in December 1941, the U.S. had no choice but to fight back.

The Office of Production Management determined how much machinery manufacturers could sell to civilians and how much would go to the war effort.

Steel shortages led to a nationwide drive for scrap to be recycled and preventive maintenance was encouraged to keep older equipment running.

Deere's factories switched gears to build everything from tank transmissions to laundry units.

In addition to aircraft parts, Deere's factories made 75-millimeter and 3-inch shells. They also assembled mobile laundry units. These "wheeled washing machines" helped prevent the disease disasters that commonly accompanied war.

Starting in March 1942, Deere was a subcontractor to the Cleveland Tractor Company (makers of Cletracs) to help make MG-1 military tractors. Commonly called "bulldozers" (even without a front blade), these machines were put to work building roads and runways.

Ý

war_45calendar.jpg

From the Freeman Brothers of Gouverneur, New York, this simple 1945 calendar shows the "V for Victory" color artwork with the woman working in the field while the men in military trucks pass by on the road. During World War II, "Rosie the Riveter" came to represent the women on the home front who kept America working. Photo © 1999 Michelle Schueder

Ý

More than 4,500 Deere employees had entered military service by the end of the war, as had many of the farmers across the country. Even Charles Wiman was forced to leave his position as president of Deere & Company to serve as a colonel in the tank and combat vehicle division of the U.S. Army's Ordnance Corps.

The end of the war brought significant changes to both employees and management at Deere & Company. Strikes and labor conflicts gave Deere a new battle to fight…right in its own backyard.

However, demand for tractors was higher than ever following World War II.

Postwar production demands led to profitable farming and a farm equipment manufacturing boom as well. Both augured well for Deere & Compay

Ý
1943 War ad

A February 1943 advertisement in Capper's Farmer featured a farmer talking to his dog named Shep about his son Joe who is off fighting the war. war_jdwarad.jpg

Here is the text in its entirety:

"Well, Shep, I suppose you think Joe could grease this a blame sight faster and better' I an.

An' you don't have to sit there lookin' like you're the only one who misses that kid. I expect he figures it's a lot more excitin' piloting a tank than riding this tractor, and he sure looked a lot snappier in his uniform than he did in a pair of overalls, but, shucks! …he'll be glad to get back one of these days.

You know, Shep, it's kinda surprising how much less gas we use now that the kid ain't around to think up a thousand and one reasons why he should drive to town. Ma says the washing and ironing is a lot easier, too, but she don't seem to appreciate it much.

We're pretty lucky back here, Shep. We ain't got any Germans or Japs takin' pot shot sat us—not yet. But it ain't all easy sledding, neither. Humph!–no use thinkin' about what we're doing' back here, but if working and praying will do any good, Shep — an' it will — we'll have Joe back with us before too long.

Go on! Git! Shep…you're takin' my mind off my work!"

Farm folk throughout our nation are carrying on courageously in the face of serious obstacles. Mentally awake—with hearts attuned to the great task before them—these defenders of the second line are meeting the need for the farm produce so important in the pursuit of the war and in the peace to come. In the same spirit, American industry has tuned its cadence to a martial tempo, speeding the production of war material.

Ours is a peace-loving nation. Our strength is built upon freedom of individual enterprise—on freedom from regimentation. It is to preserve and perpetuate these blessings that we enter whole-heartedly into a ruthless war—Ýthat we draw the double-edged sword of freedom and invoke a righteous wrath against the aggressor. And these blessings will survive, for an American people, aroused to the danger of domination, have rallied in defense of their liberties just as did their fore-bears a hundred and seventy-five years ago.

These things must survive the battle because, as a free-born people, we look forward beyond the strife and final victory to peace and the return to the American way of life.

We all await the day when machines will be used solely in peaceful pursuits. Meanwhile, we must keep our farm implements in good working condition, guarding zealously the performance of each. Your John Deere dealer will render invaluable aid in maintaining your farm equipment at greatest efficiency. Make his store your service headquarters.

Are you ear-marking some of your War Bonds for farm equipment you will need after the war? Uncle Sam needs your dollars now—you'll find need for them later.

Ý

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What about other's MM, MF, Deere, Oliver, and so on?

Ernest, As stated in 41M's post the government limited all civilian manufacturing. That limited new automobiles, trucks, tractors, tires, you name it. The government also incouraged all industry to get involved with production of the war machine in the name of victory. Which industry did, that is how they survived. Off hand I can't tell you what all Ford built during the war. Nor can I list what Oliver , MM, Chevrolet, GMC, AC or any one else built or contributed to the war effort. But you can bet that to not join in the war effort would have been considered un American and detramental to the future well being of any large manufacturing company. When America finally entered the war they entered 100%. An there is little doubt but the way Industry was able to switch to military production, and put Rosie the riviter to work while Joe was fighting for freedom on the front line set the course of victory.

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Here's but a few:

Ford; B-24 Liberator 4 engine bombers.

Oliver; Cletrac primemovers.

MM; Aircraft tugs.

Chevrolet; Trucks, staff cars.

GMC; trucks.

AC; Bulldozers.

Studebaker; Trucks.

Chrysler; M4 Sherman tanks.

Cadillac; M5 Stuart tanks.

Massey-Harris: M5 Stuart tanks.

White; M3 Halftracks.

Willys; Jeeps.

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deere was little bitty company in ww2 nothong near the size of IHC

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GM had many different divisions. Allison Engines was one- aircraft engines, including the engines for the P-39, P-40, P-38, and early P-51s. Cleveland Engine build sub engines.

Case built B-26 wings (Grandma Marian worked at the Rockford plant for awhile where they were produced). They also built a whole bunch of magnetos for aircraft applications.

Allis built a bunch of turbochargers (many of which went into P-38s) and, by weight, most of the equipment used in the Manhatten Project.

I just found a page a few days ago that listed IH military contracts up through about 1965.

Aircraft: Engine cowlings, wheels and brakes, engine parts, nose gears

Ammunition- a bunch of fuses for different applications, shell and bomb. Shells included 37MM, 40MM, 75MM, 105MM, and shell parts.

Vehicles: Military Motor Trucks, 6x6 trucks, 4x4 trucks, Dump Trucks, cargo trucks, fire trucks, mobile canteens, ambulances, rocket launcher trucks, halftracks, tank recovery vehicles, medium tanks, light tanks, airborne crawler tractors, crawler tractors, high speed personnel tractors, armored infantry vehicles, cargo tractors, transmissions and final drives for British Cruser Tanks, 57MM antitank gun carriages, 155 MM gun carriages

Weapons: 20MM aircraft guns, M1 Garands, Firing pins, Automatic loaders for Bofors 40MM guns, 20 MM antiaircraft gun mounts, Gun Mounts, 57 MM, M2 Trackers for electrical gun directors, gun tubes, aircraft torpedoes

Others: Generators, Diesel Engines, gasolene engines, power units, truck chassis, Steam Winches, blood bank refrigerators, invasion ice chests

R&D projects: LIghtweight tank suspensions, noise and vibration reduchtion for tracekd vehicles, lots of other suspension research, Universal ENgineer tractor, LPG snow tractor, 8x8 10 ton vehicle, high pressure hydraulic systems, others

All sorts of parts for other vehicles. Castings and forging for other companies. IH apparently made tooling for other companies.

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And that was just in the US. IH Canada, IH Great Britain, and IH Australia made a bunch of stuff. The German and captured French plants generally stuck to ag equipment from what I understand. At least one IH German employee was questioned by the Gestapo about that... Neuss Works on an island in the Rhine River tended to stick out like a sore thumb to the early radar bombing systems, that plant was plastered.

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Two items of clarification--IH did not build any actual Jeeps (although Ford did, probably as many or more than Willys.) IH did build military-styled 4x4 trucks as small a 1/2 ton.

IH M-1 rifle production was in the 1952-54 period, not during WWII.

And I've read that IH developed a medium duty tank to be built at Bettendorf, but the contract was cancelled because the Army decided it was too small and Bettendorf was used for rebuilding Sherman Tanks instead.

Howard

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Here is one of the others:

The following information comes from Cockshutt, The Complete Story:

For WW2, the Brantford plant manufactured undercarriages for several models of bombers, plywood fuselages and wings for Anson Trainers and the Mosquito Bomber, artillary trailers and artillary shells of various sizes. Branford Coach and Body was turning out mechanical transport bodies, ambulances and specialty trailers. The Frost & Wood plant manufactured the gun limbers for the 25 pounder and assorted bridge and transport equipment as well as mills hand grenades.

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"The government also incouraged all industry to get involved with production of the war machine in the name of victory. Which industry did, that is how they survived.

If you look in the pre WWII period, there were dozens, if not a hundred smaller tractor manufacturers across the U.S. After WWII many of these couldn't readjust production fast enough and were left behind and shuttered. As opposed to surviving, WWII policies killed a great many small manufacturers.

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"The government also incouraged all industry to get involved with production of the war machine in the name of victory. Which industry did, that is how they survived.

If you look in the pre WWII period, there were dozens, if not a hundred smaller tractor manufacturers across the U.S. After WWII many of these couldn't readjust production fast enough and were left behind and shuttered. As opposed to surviving, WWII policies killed a great many small manufacturers.

From what I have learned, the Great Depression closed a lot of those small tractor companies. They were gone before WWII ever started.

Al

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And I've read that IH developed a medium duty tank to be built at Bettendorf, but the contract was cancelled because the Army decided it was too small and Bettendorf was used for rebuilding Sherman Tanks instead.

Howard

Do You have any more info on that plant in Bettendorf? The only place I can think it would have been was a J.I.Case plant just north of the I-74 bridge along State Street.

Case shuttered the plant several years ago and I think it's a parking lot for a gambling boat.

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"The government also incouraged all industry to get involved with production of the war machine in the name of victory. Which industry did, that is how they survived.

If you look in the pre WWII period, there were dozens, if not a hundred smaller tractor manufacturers across the U.S. After WWII many of these couldn't readjust production fast enough and were left behind and shuttered. As opposed to surviving, WWII policies killed a great many small manufacturers.

From what I have learned, the Great Depression closed a lot of those small tractor companies. They were gone before WWII ever started.

Al

I believe you are correct, just as the Depression was the cause of a lot of automobile manufacturers to fail. The first few years after the end of the war, was a time of attempting to supply the demand which had built up during the war years. Business that survived the depression were working balls to the wall to supply the war effort.

I buy Popular Science and Popular Mechanics magazines from the 1940's, and it is amazing what companies, got completely away from their core product lines, and were producing for the military. Even toy companies stopped making toys due to material shortages, and even most production of commonly used consumables, the vast majority of production went to the military, and the civilian wishing to buy flashlight batteries, hand tools, and such had to prove a need.

I believe this is where the term "guns or butter" came from, and is one of the reasons the public has become so complacent about the military, since our economy has never really been on a war footing since the Korean Conflict, and has been able to supply both the military and the civilian needs.

I wonder how people would react now, if limits were placed on what, when, and how much of an item you could buy?

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20 yrs ago I worked for the "Structo" Company in Freeport, IL. I think We discussed their toy trucks, etc. a couple yrs ago. I never actually saw them but they were supposed to have had tooling left over from the materials they produced for the Military during WW II.

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I believe you are correct, just as the Depression was the cause of a lot of automobile manufacturers to fail. The first few years after the end of the war, was a time of attempting to supply the demand which had built up during the war years. Business that survived the depression were working balls to the wall to supply the war effort.

I buy Popular Science and Popular Mechanics magazines from the 1940's, and it is amazing what companies, got completely away from their core product lines, and were producing for the military. Even toy companies stopped making toys due to material shortages, and even most production of commonly used consumables, the vast majority of production went to the military, and the civilian wishing to buy flashlight batteries, hand tools, and such had to prove a need.

I believe this is where the term "guns or butter" came from, and is one of the reasons the public has become so complacent about the military, since our economy has never really been on a war footing since the Korean Conflict, and has been able to supply both the military and the civilian needs.

I wonder how people would react now, if limits were placed on what, when, and how much of an item you could buy?

It is true, people of my generation and younger have no idea what it was like, or what it would be like to not be able to go to a store and buy whatever, whenever.

It is also fascinating to me how long it took to convert back to civilian life and begin re-manufacturing consumer goods instead of war materials. It blows my mind that my grandfather had to wait so long to get his new Super A--three years after WWII was over, with IH's plants working full-blast!

Al

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Do You have any more info on that plant in Bettendorf? The only place I can think it would have been was a J.I.Case plant just north of the I-74 bridge along State Street.

Case shuttered the plant several years ago and I think it's a parking lot for a gambling boat.

I know nothing of the plant itself. What I read came from some of the company magazine that some of the old-timers had collected over the years, but I've got nothing myself.

Howard

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