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cm228

Farmall 826

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The 826 was the 756 series II, IH didn't want to confuse people so they ended up calling it the 826, the 856 custom was the JD 4000 cheapo fighter. The 826 is simply a 856 rear with a 756 front but has the slightly bigger German in it. Good tractors, they arn't 856's but they are fuel sipper, long lasting, and good pulling tractors!

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I cant tell you much about an 826 but i will say that as far as testing the torque goes you really cant tell until you get it home and use it because the oil will be stiffer when u test it and also that trick just doesnt seem to work in my opinion. The 1066 we have has an awful torque in it that needs to be replaced but if u "test" it it will seem good

just my 2 cents Kevin

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The 826 was the 756 series II, IH didn't want to confuse people so they ended up calling it the 826, the 856 custom was the JD 4000 cheapo fighter. The 826 is simply a 856 rear with a 756 front but has the slightly bigger German in it. Good tractors, they arn't 856's but they are fuel sipper, long lasting, and good pulling tractors!

Yes, but they built both the 756 and 826 at the same time, 1969,1970,1971 and the 4000 came out in 1969. The 826 was cheaper than the 856 custom. What was the first year for the 856 custom?....James

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My 8200 hour '70 826 is an example of a tired, poorly maintained (but cheap) tractor that keeps on working. I bought it as an abused child, operational but cosmetically bad and in need of TLC.

The engine has not been apart and is the best part of the tractor. I learned the D358 is an engine that likes to be worked. It doesn't warm up without a load applied. Mine is the original low compression version and it will slobber like crazy if you let it idle too long because it's not generating much heat... so I don't. I start it up and go to work ASAP. It doesn't do any light work around here. It's the tillage tractor and if it isn't doing that, it's parked. WHen I first bought it it sucked up lots of oil, but by adopting the "hard work or off" regimen, going from a straight the SAE 30 the PO used to Rotella-T 15W40 and not letting it idle and slobber (diluting the oil), it now uses 1-2 quarts per season (about 50 hours). I can attest to it being a hard starter on cold days, but I have a block heater on it and use it any time it's remotely cool. The cold start device (pull up on the kill cable a coupla inches) does help. Mine had an etherizer on it, but it was inop.

The tractor is pretty loose all around and I fix it up as things break. Mine has a TA (so far so good) and diff lock, which still works. I had to replace the clutch not long after I got it but I found it had been recently replaced and whoever machined the flywheel did it wrong and didn't get the steps right so the clutch slipped due to inadequate clamping force.

Biggest problem I had was the first time I had it on the chisel (mounted 9-shank). Two of the wheel clamp studs broke when made a hard turn using the right brake and the wheel came off. Yeeeha! Turned out the PO had replaced two of the studs on one wheel with "something" that wasn't up to the task. FNo seriius damage to anything (stained underwear!) but fixing that in the field (by myself) was fun. Later, when I was trying to use my mounted moldboard plow, one of the lift arms pulled apart from internal rust on the threads. The arms had been frozen and I used heat (moderate amount) and a rust penetrant to get them loose to adjust the plow. Another yeeha moment. The most annoying problem has been hydraulic leaks (the remote valves) and the MCV. I had the valves apart 3-4 time and replaced all the seals but they still leaked. Replaced the valves with used ones, no more leakee! Next fix will be the shift linkage, which is loose as a goose.

My next door neighbor runs a same-year 4020 and pulls almost the identical equipment as I do, and on the same clay ground, but my 826 uses at least 1 GPH less fuel doing it. Working it as hard as I can, chisel plowing clay, it uses about 4 GPH.

I like the tractor and would own another... but I'd spend a few more bucks for a better tractor next time around.

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I still want one!! When I was looking for a tractor I actually went and looked at an 826 hydro but the dealer was honest enough to tell me that the hydro slipped when she got hot!! other than that it was a nice straight tractor! well sitting right next to it was a nice 766..seemed huge compared to the 826! Well after some more looking I bought the 766! I remember driving them both side by side and boy that german diesel sure was much quieter and seemed smoother than the 360. but after growing up with a 756 I also know they dont start as well when it's 0 degrees out either! For our operation I think an 826 hydro would be the ultimate baling tractor...so I'll keep dreaming and saving my pennies for an 826 hydro!! keep your eyes open for me guys!

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I thought the 514 made an impression........976......I'ts going to be tuff packing the box with another one is it not? :ph34r:

......If any one is interested, The guy we get our hay from want's to sell his 826. I found this out this evening. 6k hrs with only 500 on a majior and new paint. Post me for details,Thanks.

that wouldn't be Mike over on M-21 would it?

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,,,,yep Mike .......on m21 :ph34r:

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what's he want for it now? he offered it to me @4yrs. ago and wanted $7500, he said it showed 115hp on the dyno after the rebuild.

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vs

Im just saying...

Can't fairly compare a 856 to an 826 Hydro, that hydro sucks all kinds of ponies out of your PTO horsepower... It's like running two hydraulic valves at the same time while running PTO, it sure sucks that little extra right off the top. I'm not saying an 826 has more power than an 856, but stock tuned they are VERY similar tractors!!!

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Dad bought an 826 gear new.

It was one great tractor.

Had to do the TA one time after many years of pulling it hard.

The German diesel is one sweet running engine.

You can turn the idle down to the point of counting the fan blades.

The only down side:

The Robert Bosch pump takes a true expert to work on.

They use a hydraulic governor which you swear can see a load coming.

These have to be set on the test stand and parts are very high.

Some people have tried to convert these to Roosa Masters or American Bosch pumps with little success.

Just a warning, if the diesel pump needs work, get your checkbook out.

Other than that, one of the sweetest tractor you will ever run.

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Guys

Thanks for all the great info on these tractors, I have not been able to get over and talk to the dealer I hope to soon,

Diesel Doc

I take it some people have tried to install other inj pump models on these engines? When you say they have limited success, would the eng not run correctly or pull properly? Just curious.

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Guys

Thanks for all the great info on these tractors, I have not been able to get over and talk to the dealer I hope to soon,

Diesel Doc

I take it some people have tried to install other inj pump models on these engines? When you say they have limited success, would the eng not run correctly or pull properly? Just curious.

You'll never have the same performance or fuel efficiency. That Bosch pump is just designed for the long stroke or something, I have no idea, but I know of a 756D which was switched... owner wished he had bit it and fixed the old pump than put a cheaper one on.

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