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Texan4Life

Can anyone ID this old seed drill? [pics]

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I have been toying with the idea of restoring some of our old farm equipment (mostly all red) and I was thinking this old seed drill might be a good beginners project. It seems to be mostly intact. It has IHC stamped on each side and I wasn't able to locate a model name/number. Though it was getting dark on me and maybe I will be able to get some better pics later.

So anyone have an idea what model it is and about how old it is??

Is it restorable? If the wheels are free do you think it could be pulled a half mile of gravel road to our house?

Here are some pics.. sorry for the low light...

16mfrq.jpg

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f0wz90.jpg

143hldj.jpg

r8dmdc.jpg

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zl2deo.jpg

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It reminds me of the old 13MF we have, but not quite the same. Ours is wood box on steel with rubber drop tubes

That one appears just to be grain only, so XX(number of openers)M (F for fert) ???

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GOOD GRIEF it's an International Harvester. I have one like it in the barn. Note the IHC on the side

Pat,

you've been holding out on me huh. or did you not want me too start drooling again.

David

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Texan

It is similar to an IH we had when I was young. It is older than ours, though. Ours did not have the IH on the end of the box. I do not know the model number, but think that the one we had is still going.

Check all of the castings. They would be what is hard to find. And if the rust is not to bad on the rest, you got it made.

For towing, grease the axel shafts, and unhook the chains from any sprockets on them. You do not want it to hit a bump and have it jump into gear. Also make sure that you do not drag your discs. If they are froze up, they will wear off very fast on a gravel road. When you get it home, take your favoite penitrating oil and get serious with it. Then forget about the drill for three or four weeks, and then give it another dose. Be pacient to losen stuff up.

Looks like a great project!!!

Have fun!!! :blush::rolleyes:

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I am not sure it had a model number or letter the parts book for the one I have like that just says McCORMICK-DEERING High Steel End Wheel Drill on the cover.

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I have a owners manual that is darn near perfect for that drill, or a similiar model. Found it in grain drill at the junk yard. :rolleyes:

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Thanks for the replies so far guys... If this morning drizzle lets up (FINALLY some kind of moisture) and dries out a little today I will see if I can find any numbers on castings or something. And maybe even get it out of the weeds.

That would be awesome if we could turn up a manual or brochure for it!

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GOOD GRIEF it's an International Harvester. I have one like it in the barn. Note the IHC on the side

Pat,

you've been holding out on me huh. or did you not want me too start drooling again.

David

David you never noticed the Grain Drill in the east end if the barn? The bottom is the boses is pretty well shot, it wouldn't be worth a dar to try to sow anything with it. But the over all appearence isn't bad. came complete with owners manual.

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Pretty rusty alright. Maybe someone forgot to clean the boxes out? Or just the damp climte. We don't ususally see that unless there was fertilizer or seed left in the box.

This ad from 1953 shows a similar drill but likely a newer version of yours. This one appears to have power lift but pretty sure hydraulic lift was optional.

post-90-1234889219_thumb.jpg

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It is a McCormick Deering grain drill of late 30's, 40's, or early 50's vintage. The number of the drill was determined by the number of drills and spacing. Example McCormick Deering 14 x 7, 20 x 6, 16 x 6 etc. It was available with single disk openers, double disk openers, or shoe furrow openers and numerous attachments. It was available as 12x6, 14x6, 16x6, 18x6, 20x6, 22x6, 24x6, 28,6, 9x7, 10x7, 11x7, 12x7, 13x7, 14x7, 16x7, 18x7, 24x7, 8x8, 9x8, 10x8, 12x8, 16x8, and 20x8 sizes.

Harold H

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GOOD GRIEF it's an International Harvester. I have one like it in the barn. Note the IHC on the side

GOOD GRIEF, 13MF is the IHC model number. I even have the owners manual for it. 13 = number of openers, M = grain drill F = Fertilizer.

I have two in the shed (13MF and 11MF) and yes it does have IHC on the sides like you noted.

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Yours would be a 11 x 7 grain drill with fertilizer atachment and a 13 x 7 grain drill with fertilizer atachment by my 1941 catalog.

Harold H

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Thanks for the info guy.. I think mine is a 16x7 with single disk openers

Here are some more pics:

http://i42.tinypic.com/vpcehz.jpg

close up of metering adjusting casting with large 7" :

http://i44.tinypic.com/2ezkye0.jpg

Sweet duct tape.. I wonder how long this thing was in use:

http://i44.tinypic.com/2i1f3nb.jpg

I think I'm going to do a pretty much complete disassembly and reassembly. Alot of the parts are small enough to fit in a blasting cabinet, so thats a plus. Whats the best way to paint the small parts? Ive heard you can get trade colors in spray cans now, would that work? would the can painted parts match if I use a spray gun on larger parts (like frame and box)?

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