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randy hall

706-806 gas tractors

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who ever thought that it would ever be cheaper to go to the field and plow or work ground with a 706 or an 806 gas tractor than it would be a diesel. makes you wonder how long this cheaqp gas will last.

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makes you wonder how long this cheaqp gas will last.

Probably about long enough for whatever's left of the Big 3 to ramp up truck and suv production again and put fuel efficient vehicles in the back seat.

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lets hear some realistic numbers on gallons per hour before you say its 'cheaper'. I have never plowed with any of those tractors in a gas version so i dont know.

anyone?

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When I was a kid my uncle had 2 806 gasers and if I remember right 5.5 gal per hour on the plow pulling the lungs out of them. At night turn off the lights and the tractor was almost white along the exhaust manifold side and red flame out the top!

ed

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When I was a kid my uncle had 2 806 gasers and if I remember right 5.5 gal per hour on the plow pulling the lungs out of them. At night turn off the lights and the tractor was almost white along the exhaust manifold side and red flame out the top!

ed

A diesel maybe. Our 450 Gas Farmall burned 5 gal/hr.

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When doing tillage work a diesel is going to be a lot more economical than the gas version is. When I used to own and use an Oliver 1650 gas pulling the 535 plow it would burn 7 gallons/hr. Since switching to a 656 diesel pulling the very same plow it burns half of what the Ollie used to.

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Yuo are right Hoot. But so is Randy. A diesel will almost always use less fuel, but with gasoline at $1.37 and diesel at $2.26 (both before taxes), the gas tractor would be cheaper to run. If current prices hold, I will be using the gas tractors next spring. It will be the first time in a long time that it makes economical sense. I used a couple gas tractors last summer for haying, and enjoyed it.

If this fuel price trend continues, I wonder if gas tractor prices will start to go up?

Dale

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I still think you are ahead with diesel at double the price. From my experience even on light loads those gas engines will burn close to the same amount just to keep them running. The engine has to suck so much air through the engine even to keep running, on a gas that air also equals fuel. When you throttle a gas engine back the engine works sucking against the throttle plate, so therefore it is even less efficiant( thermodynmically etc) then when it is un throttled running wide open. Your air to fuel ratio also richens when you throttle the engine back. Now if these old tractors were a fuel injected, like comparing a new gas truck to a diesel, the gas may well be be the better deal at current prices because there is a bigger difference from a fuel injected gas engine to a carb gas engine then there is from a mecahnical injection diesel to an electronic injection diesel. Alot depends on the tune of the gas engine, Im sure you can take 10 806 diesels, and compare them to 10 gas 806s and the diesels will alluse pretty close to the same amount of fuel, where as the gas tractors may vary quite a bit depending on carb settings or lack of

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When doing tillage work a diesel is going to be a lot more economical than the gas version is. When I used to own and use an Oliver 1650 gas pulling the 535 plow it would burn 7 gallons/hr. Since switching to a 656 diesel pulling the very same plow it burns half of what the Ollie used to.

Plus, the diesel just smells so much better.

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I'll add this much. We ran the 544 on the swing auger this fall and I kept track of one tank of fuel to see how much it used. The tractor is a gas and is a 4cyl version of the 806 engine. For the same reason I said it's cheaper to run gas than it is diesel and just wanted to prove it. I ran it about 18 hours and it still was not empty and it has a 23 gallon tank. So it was at the most 1.25 gal. hr. running at about 1200 rpm.

If I put my 1086 on we have kept track of it at 36 hours on a full tank which is around 85 gallons running a flood pump at 1300 rpm. So maybe if I would put a comparable size tractor on it would be close but still for the price of gas the 544 is a good tractor to run.

I have said on here a few times a 4 cyl gas tractor will not break the bank and I own 3 of them and will use them for mowing and different chores but will pass by a cheap 706G any day. Have figured the 3020 and 544 mowing and doing heavy utility chores at 3 gal. hr. as posted before.

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A diesel will almost always use less fuel, but with gasoline at $1.37 and diesel at $2.26 (both before taxes), the gas tractor would be cheaper to run. Dale

Dale, I just did the math using your figures in my scenario and the diesel still came out cheaper to operate; $1.68 per hour. But then again that's doing hard pulling. Both tractors have 6 cylinder engines and were with 3 cu. in. of each other, the Oliver being bigger but it ran a few hundred RPM's faster too.

When it comes down to RPM's it can make a big difference, some gas tractors can get good fuel economy doing certain jobs as long as they are not running full throttle or being pulled down real hard, that's my opinion and it doesn't always count :lol:

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When I was a kid my uncle had 2 806 gasers and if I remember right 5.5 gal per hour on the plow pulling the lungs out of them. At night turn off the lights and the tractor was almost white along the exhaust manifold side and red flame out the top!

ed

ed, this is what i was driving at. you say 5.5 gallons of gas an hour which is low but i haven't looked at the nebraska test to see the gallons per hour on maximum load. another fellow posted on the ih board that their 706 gas was overhauled and dynoed 93 horse. fuel useage was 6 gallons per hour. right now gas is still over a dollar cheaper than diesel fuel. so 6 x 1.50= 9.00 per hour fuel cost for gas . if the diesel uses 4 x2.50= 10.00 per hour fuel cost. i realize that there are a lot of way out of tune gas tractors out there that are very ineffiecent. but we use 450's super mta's and super m's and m's for light jobs and they don't seem all that costly to run but they are not worn out and all have electronic ignition. i have a 706 gas and really like the tractor. this had to be a tremendous jump over a 560 in '63. i've got a c-301 to put in it this winter because the c-263 uses a lot of oil. these are just my opinions and figures. i still like to plow with the 1466 and 1486 to see the smoke roll.

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Guest pukeko
I still think you are ahead with diesel at double the price. From my experience even on light loads those gas engines will burn close to the same amount just to keep them running. The engine has to suck so much air through the engine even to keep running, on a gas that air also equals fuel. When you throttle a gas engine back the engine works sucking against the throttle plate, so therefore it is even less efficiant( thermodynmically etc) then when it is un throttled running wide open. Your air to fuel ratio also richens when you throttle the engine back. Now if these old tractors were a fuel injected, like comparing a new gas truck to a diesel, the gas may well be be the better deal at current prices because there is a bigger difference from a fuel injected gas engine to a carb gas engine then there is from a mecahnical injection diesel to an electronic injection diesel. Alot depends on the tune of the gas engine, Im sure you can take 10 806 diesels, and compare them to 10 gas 806s and the diesels will alluse pretty close to the same amount of fuel, where as the gas tractors may vary quite a bit depending on carb settings or lack of

When it is running wide open ,it is also running richer.A carburated engine is rich at idle ,leans out mid range ,and runs richer again at the top end of the rev range . The higher the compression ratio,they tend to do better fuel wise.An injected gas engine of today is more efficient. The throttle plate theory does,nt hold water!

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don't forget upkeep and life expectancy...

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don't forget upkeep and life expectancy...

Hello all , Just what I was thinking ;) . We had both a 560 gas & 560 diesel (still have the diesel :wub: ) . You had to carry gas to run all day but you never had to haul diesel B) . Boomer

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don't forget upkeep and life expectancy...

Hello all , Just what I was thinking ;) . We had both a 560 gas & 560 diesel (still have the diesel :wub: ) . You had to carry gas to run all day but you never had to haul diesel B) . Boomer

or grind valves every week

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When doing tillage work a diesel is going to be a lot more economical than the gas version is. When I used to own and use an Oliver 1650 gas pulling the 535 plow it would burn 7 gallons/hr. Since switching to a 656 diesel pulling the very same plow it burns half of what the Ollie used to.

had 2 560's a LP Gas and a diesel. After i discovered it took twice as much LP Gas to run the one i sold it and got another diesel tractor

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Back in 1961 after I got out of the Air Force, married, and moved to California, my uncle who I had farmed with during my high school years in the late 40's and early 50's traded the "beloved 'ole 6" (souped up W-6) I'd ran a lot, off on a like new gas 560. While I was "back home" on vacation in August he got me to help him plow some wheat ground he had just rented. So away we went plowing....him with the "new 560" and the semi-mounted IH 4-16's he got with it, and me with the gas Super MTA and the trailer type John Deere #55 ABH 3-16's that had been on the farm for about 3 years. First field we plowed was a 16 acre alfalfa/quack grass sod patch and it took some power even tho it was just right moisture wise for plowing. We "knocked off" that field that afternoon and went to fill up the tractors with fuel after we finished. We found the 560 burned a little over 5 gals an hour and the Super MTA a little over 3 gals an hour. Uncle was a little disappointed with the 560...it burned quite a lot of fuel he thought and it didn't handle it's 4-16's as well as the Super MTA could handle it's 3-16's. I could "walk right up" on him anytime I wanted but didn't pass him trying to show off. I just chugged along in third gear about 3/4ths throttle with the Super and enjoyed the day. The following year Uncle traded that gas 560 for a 560 diesel and the following year traded the Super MTA for another 560 diesel. He said the 560 diesels were real fuel sippers and could outwork the Super MTA easily. Well, I ran the 560 diesels a little at various times on various jobs and I thought they were clumsy, sluggish, bad smelling, overrated POS's with good power steering and hydraulics.

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