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Youngfarmhand

Boot Oil or Mink Oil?

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I have had Double H ranch wellington work boots for a long time, but when my last pair gave it up I went to Redwing Pecos style boots. I always put mink oil on my double H's, but a fiend of mine said not to use mink oil on my Redwings and only boot oil. What do you guys use or recommend? Gotta do something the snow has arrived.

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Used motor oil!

Mo

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I use mink oil on my red wings that I have had for 3 years now. I also use mink oil on all my other boots and seems to work well.

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Dad, Grandpa, and I have always had redwings and always used mink oil. No problems so far.

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Kiwi for me.

Kiwi

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I have had Double H ranch wellington work boots for a long time, but when my last pair gave it up I went to Redwing Pecos style boots. I always put mink oil on my double H's, but a fiend of mine said not to use mink oil on my Redwings and only boot oil. What do you guys use or recommend? Gotta do something the snow has arrived.

:) I have worn Red Wings for several years, and have used their Red Wing Boot Oil (when I remember to apply it, :lol: ) I don't know how the price compares as I've never used Mink Oil. :unsure: The RW boot oil comes in an applicator bottle with a brush built into the cover (neat arrangement!) When the bottle is empty, take it back to the RW dealer and they'll re-fill it for a nominal charge. :huh: The boot oil works real well and soaks into the leather well also. :mellow: If you wear out the soles and the uppers are still good, take them back and they'll re-sole them for a nominal charge as well! :blink: I've had one pair re-soled after I stood on a revolving shaft on my hay conveyor and it wore/burned almost all of the way through one sole! :ph34r::ph34r:

Dave B)

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My Redwing dealer recommends the Redwing brand Boot Oil and am currently using it. I have also used Mink Oil and Neatsfoot Oil in the past and in my opinion, they are all good, do the same thing and I also do not believe that any one of them is better than the others.

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Guest pukeko
My Redwing dealer recommends the Redwing brand Boot Oil and am currently using it. I have also used Mink Oil and Neatsfoot Oil in the past and in my opinion, they are all good, do the same thing and I also do not believe that any one of them is better than the others.

I have found ,if it is way below freezing,not to put oil of any sort on your boots,as it makes them too cold.M y Herman Survivors,and Irish setter Red wings ,werent nearly as warm at the same temps as before.The oil is great in the fall rain etc , for waterproofing,but I was disappointed how much colder they were.I had been wearing them at 20 below C,and as long as you were walking around ,with only one pair of socks ,they were fine until I put more oil on them. UsedMotor oil has too much acid and crap in it ,and is no good for decent leather.

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Mink oil is okay but I always use boot oil. That is what Red Wing says to use and I don't argue. I haven't been using Red Wing oil but the stuff I have is really good.

This it what I use: http://www.obenaufs.com/index.php?cPath=33...d38bcf03f0d6de3

NEVER use used motor oil or anything that has petroleum based products on leather. Pertoleum will break leather down. It may make boots more comfortable for a while but in the long run it is very hard on them.

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For protecting leather, avoid mink oil or any animal fats-they contain acids, which in time will cause the leather to break down. Also, since animal fats are biodegradable, in time they become rancid also.

For softening, waterproofing and preserving footwear, SnoSeal is the only way to go-it's made from Beeswax, and is of the same consistency as mink oil without the drawbacks.

I apply it like this-first, send the wife to her mom's, shopping, the PTA, etc.

Next, set the oven at 200F, put your clean boots in there, and leave the oven open to the first notch (don't do this on a gas stove).

When the boots are warm to the touch (you can still handle them, they're just warm), begin applying SnoSeal liberally-it will begin to melt and soak in like butter on hot toast. Keep applying until the boots will absorb no more, then put them back in the oven.

Keep repeating until the boots will absorb no more Sno Seal, then buff off the excess.

This procedure will take a brand new out of the box pair of boots and make them feel like a well broken in pair in minutes, along with waterproofing, preserving and protecting them.

I got almost 7 years out of my last set of RW's using this method every 6 months or so.

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I got almost 7 years out of my last set of RW's using this method every 6 months or so.

I have lost count on how long I've been wearing the RW I have now. Only used Red Wing boot oil, and not as often as I should have. Got the bottle with the brush that they refill, deluxe adjustable brush set in the bottle cap.

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NEVER use used motor oil or anything that has petroleum based products on leather. Pertoleum will break leather down. It may make boots more comfortable for a while but in the long run it is very hard on them.

Oh come on, never spill any oil on your boots?? :P I treat mine with motor oil, hytran, and lots of diesel! In fact I got diesel on them last week and this morning they were dusted by white spray paint.

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I do what Chickenhauler does--have a 1983 pair of leather climbing boots still going strong with that treatment. Not the same as everyday wearing in the crap but when I put them on them it's not for a walk in the park either.

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NEVER use used motor oil or anything that has petroleum based products on leather. Pertoleum will break leather down. It may make boots more comfortable for a while but in the long run it is very hard on them.

Oh come on, never spill any oil on your boots?? :P I treat mine with motor oil, hytran, and lots of diesel! In fact I got diesel on them last week and this morning they were dusted by white spray paint.

Got me on that one.

But to counter that, I get a pretty steady application of cattle manure on them but I don't expect it to help preserve them!

Boots take a beating on my feet.

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I spray my boots with dry silicone spray like "camp-dry" from wal-mart or any of the automotive grades from the auto parts store. I also use it on Carhartt coats where it makes the water bead up. I have used sno seal in the past with good results but I guess I'm just too lazy for that now. :blush: As a full time slightly overweight mechanic with splayed out feet, a pair of boots only last me about a year anyway so I'm mainly concerned with waterproofing which the silicone spray does. It also does not alter the appearance of what you spray it on unlike the sno seal.

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I spray my boots with dry silicone spray like "camp-dry" from wal-mart or any of the automotive grades from the auto parts store. I also use it on Carhartt coats where it makes the water bead up. I have used sno seal in the past with good results but I guess I'm just too lazy for that now. :blush: As a full time slightly overweight mechanic with splayed out feet, a pair of boots only last me about a year anyway so I'm mainly concerned with waterproofing which the silicone spray does. It also does not alter the appearance of what you spray it on unlike the sno seal.

Good point-I almost forgot that Sno Seal may darken some leathers.

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For protecting leather, avoid mink oil or any animal fats-they contain acids, which in time will cause the leather to break down. Also, since animal fats are biodegradable, in time they become rancid also.

I have discovered that too after using mink oil on a pair of shoes, after a while the shoes will start to stink and after wearing them my feet would really smell bad after taking the shoes off.

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For protecting leather, avoid mink oil or any animal fats-they contain acids, which in time will cause the leather to break down. Also, since animal fats are biodegradable, in time they become rancid also.

For softening, waterproofing and preserving footwear, SnoSeal is the only way to go-it's made from Beeswax, and is of the same consistency as mink oil without the drawbacks.

I apply it like this-first, send the wife to her mom's, shopping, the PTA, etc.

Next, set the oven at 200F, put your clean boots in there, and leave the oven open to the first notch (don't do this on a gas stove).

When the boots are warm to the touch (you can still handle them, they're just warm), begin applying SnoSeal liberally-it will begin to melt and soak in like butter on hot toast. Keep applying until the boots will absorb no more, then put them back in the oven.

Keep repeating until the boots will absorb no more Sno Seal, then buff off the excess.

This procedure will take a brand new out of the box pair of boots and make them feel like a well broken in pair in minutes, along with waterproofing, preserving and protecting them.

I got almost 7 years out of my last set of RW's using this method every 6 months or so.

Good post! I agree completely with your method of aplication! :blink:

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Lexol leather conditioner is the best I've found. An Almish boot dealer told me about it when I bought two pairs of Redwings from him. Good for any type leather and it's not sticky. Works great!

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