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cory g

hydro vs stick transmition

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what do you guys like better i personally like the hydro better.

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Depends on what Your doing. Mowing and just pulling a small cart around the yard a Hydro is great. But I also spray My yard with a scaled down version of a field sprayer, Be tough to fit 60 foot booms between My trees! :D I need a constant ground speed to spray accurately and a gear drive is much more consistent at keeping speed. Also on hard pulls, just like on the full-size FARMALL's Hydro's tend to get really hot. 6-7 yrs ago at IHCUBCADET Plow Day #2 in the fall the bean ground We plowed had just been combined when kinda wet and it was packed hard like blacktop. Ground turned over in huge slabs. My little 10 HP gear drive CC would only pull My plow in low gear, would just die right out in 2nd. The Hydros would pull their plows faster, but also had more HP, Guys I was running with had a 1450, 169, and a hot 782. Couple of the Hydros actually boiled the Hytran out of their tractors. The rearend of My little gear drive was still cold.

One thing I will say, When I worked at FARMALL the Boss of the Fork Truck garage also repaired/maintained the CC's they used to pull the trash hoppers around the plant. Those CC's were run 7-8 hrs per day, 5 & 6 days per week. And the carts were 4 ft wide x 8 ft long x 4 ft tall welded steel (heavy!) and FULL of everything from busted up wooden pallets to crushed cardboard boxes, sometimes they'd hook 2 & 3 carts together into trailer trains. And the Hydro's proved to be MUCH more durable than the gear drives with clutches. Just like automatic trans trucks are rated to tow more than manual trans trucks. All depends on how You take care of them!

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I personally hate to drive hydros. I don't like the tranny going to neutral when you use the brakes.

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I prefer gear drive. I feel like I have more control.

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I have used both, and like Dr. Evil said, each one has its place. Have to agree that gear drive gives a feeling of more control(it does for me, anyway). The hydro Cub I used to use for mowing, a 1710, was super on the flat, but it had a tendency to slow down on hills and embankments if you didn't keep after it.

I'm hoping that we get some real snowfall this winter so I can have some fun pushing snow with my 582, now that it's all back together. :D I could probably have a good bit of the street plowed out before the city snowplow even shows up, as slow as the city is ...

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post-32799-1226623031_thumb.jpgWell since then the 72 has been retired to butt buggie duty, & We GOt this update tractor, OOhh Yes we can move some snow TOO !! :D

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Both have their advantages in specific areas. A hydro will be the most useful (and least costly to maintain) to the average owner.

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The hydro Cub I used to use for mowing, a 1710, was super on the flat, but it had a tendency to slow down on hills and embankments if you didn't keep after it.

I noticed that on my 1864 too. It will also slow down when making sharp turns if you are going slow enough. If you have your ground speed up then there's no problem.

Personally I prefer Hydro's over gear drives on a lawn & garden tractor.

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Since they both have their advantages depending on the job the answer is to have one of each ! :D

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Since they both have their advantages depending on the job the answer is to have one of each ! :D

Two or three of each actually.... :D I've had as many as SIX in My shop at one time....oddly three gear drives and three hydros, but only three were Mine.

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yeah i like billohio awnser now i have a nother execuise to go by more cubs

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yeah i like billohio awnser now i have a nother execuise to go by more cubs

you need an excuse??? ;)B)

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I have more control with a hydro. I've used both and think the gear drive wastes time, money and fuel, just IMO. I can appreicate both, but a hydro is for me.

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I have more control with a hydro. I've used both and think the gear drive wastes time, money and fuel, just IMO. I can appreicate both, but a hydro is for me.

Not sure how a GD wastes money, or gas, my GD's mow on about the same amount of gas as my hydro's. The hydro's do save time, you can mow as fast as conditions allow, where with a GD you're stuck with three speeds.

I'd run a hydro before I'd use a GD w/creeper. Hydro is the best tractor for a tiller or snow blower, but I've blown a lot of snow with an 8 HP GD, the first full 36 inch pass is just really slow.

I did try to spot spray around all my trees & bushes one time with my 129 Hydro. ONE TIME was all it took, I use the 70 or 72 now ONLY. You run out of hands, one on the wand, one on the wheel.... Hmmmm Now how do you move the hydro lever and steer? With the GD you can shift to 1st or rev when it's convenient and ease the clutch in or out when you want to move. Plus for broadcast spraying the GD holds a constant ground speed much much better than a hydro.

Other nice thing about a GD is there's no hydro "creep". You can set the brake on the clutch pedal or shut the engine off and put them in gear and they'll be in the same spot when you come back. With my hydro's they always seem to like to move forward or backward a bit. And you can tow a GD, where with a hydro you shouldn't, even if it has the automatic dump valves.

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I have two hydros and a gear drive is in my furure when I run up on the right deal. The hydros do change speed a lot, really pulls the engine up the hills, but I have a 14HP replacement koler with the walbro carb, and the gov acts like it won't work. I think it's just the crappy carb since it has a horrible flat spot and overall just runs like crap compaired to the worn out 10 horse. I drive with my hand on the speed controller at all times, but the yards I mow make me change speed and direction a lot. I like to "stripe" my yard and the MILs which means lots of turning and backing up. A gear drive would take forever doing it that way, but I sure would hate to try to pull a plow with a hydro.

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ive got a 682 hydro and a 100 gear drive. love them both.

100 is on my lawn wheel rake. and is used for pulling heavy stuff around.

682 has a deck on, use it for picking up grass, branches, etc yard work.

2 cubs, best of both worlds. :D

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Used to cut my grass with a 100 when I upgraded to a 1650 thought I died and gone to heaven.When I changed again to a 682 I knew I died and gone to heaven.Now I use a 782 with a Magnum 18 repower....7th heaven

.

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I agree that hydros have there place and GDs have theres. I personally like hydros for mowing because it eliminates pedal use altogether. When the tractor is shifted to neutral it stops plain and simple so brakes are rarely needed. I also think GDs are better suited for garden work however I just finished plowing my garden with a 129. It did break down because the trunion slot just blew out. I had just fixed it last year and I think I just overlooked a couple of stress cracks and that's why it failed. My welds held up fine. As far as "creep" goes in a hydro it can be adjusted out. The manual instructs on how to find neutral and adjust hydro linkage for reassembly. I would always advise one to use the parking brake on a hydro when parked on any incline...they will move. That's one of the things I like about GDs. When I get off I just put it in reverse. This keeps the shifter low and the tractor easier to get on/off but that's also because I'm somewhat limited with a bad back (and getting older).

Like someone mentioned earlier, it's debates like this that help justify owning both.

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This is ironic, I signed on tonight to start the same topic - good minds think alike :) .

I have a 1772 diesel that I am starting to restore - it was rode hard and left for dead. I currently use a 782 gas that does mowing and tiller work. I find the hydro works great for mowing, but when you put the tiller behind it is seems like you are constantly adjusting the hydro, more so than mowing. When the tiller grabs a bite, the hydro won't hold it and you learch ahead and then stop. We have a pretty large garden, so it does a lot of tilling and the learching gets old after a while :rolleyes: .

I have thoughts of making the 1772 a gear drive and mounting the tiller on that. It would be nice to have a gear drive to pull wagons, produce cart, tiller, and plow up and down our hilly farm without getting the hydro hot.

What are your thoughts?

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COOTER - They used Hydro tractors, 14 & 16 HP at FARMALL to pull large trash carts/wagons around ALL DAY Every day, and the manager of the fork truck garage told me the hydro tractors held up much better than the earlier gear drive tractors did. If the hydro unit is clean, no oily gunk an inch thick built up on it, and the cooling fan is in place and doesn't have any missing blades, I don't think you'll hurt the hydro in your 1772. I pull a hyd dump cart that weighs about 600# empty and around 3000# loaded with my 982 all the time, it's no problem at all.

I've heard people say a gear drive with a creeper runs a tiller better than a hydro, but I ran DAD's 129 with a tiller for a while and I think the hydro does O-K too. My Buddy brought his 317 JD over one night to till my garden, pretty much the same as your 782, he hit the roots of a BIG Canadian thistle with the tiller and it lifted the back of the tractor clear off the ground and moved it forward 2-3 feet in the blink of an eye. As my cousin once said, the tractor running a tiller pretty much has to hold the tiller back so it can dig/till the ground.

Be a lot of work to put a 3-spd in a larger frame tractor like your 1772, known as a Super Garden tractor, it would physically bolt up but you're on your own getting the creeper gear, clutch, drive shaft, brake linkage hooked up. If you want to try your tiller on a gear drive I'd look for a different CC for the tiller, a 128 with a creeper would be good, or any 12 HP GD.

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Dr. Evil I can see where spot spraying by hand would be terrible with a hydro. On the old hydros we've run 127,129,682, & 782 I drive with on hand on the hydro lever. I do like the foot control on my 2166. I'd have to say I prefer the hydro. Eason

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I guess I'm suprised to hear the hydro's were tougher than the gear drives. The gear trans was used from '48 to 80ish - used through the 184? The pullers say you can put 50-70 hp through them before you have any issues, so I figured they were bullet proof. What issues did they have with the gear drive inside the plant?

I graded the drive way the other week after it rained with our 1872 and that trans got rediculosly hot, so that's what leaned me toward converting the diesel to a gear drive. I had also thought of turning up the pump and doing some pulling with it, I wonder how the hydro would do....

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