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Dax DeCelle

split rim wheels

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I bought some used 9.00 x 20 tires for my 78 Loadstar and I have been told by a couple of people that it is very dangerous to change the tires on split rims. I called all three tire places in my small town and one said that they won't do them, one wants $22.50 plus tax a tire and one wants $27.50 a tire, just to change them. That's almost $150 for six. That's a lot of money!!! Is there something that I need to know before I attempt it my self? What's all this "dangerous" stuff?

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Split rims are prone to not seating in properly. I know a guy that was almost killed by a ring popping off while he was inflating it. Many others weren't so lucky. Tremendous force. After any rim work they need to be aired up inside a cage.

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Had a rim slip off and slice my friends head off instantly, don't fool with them. Find a dealer who knows how to handle them in a cage as stated.

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If you have never dismounted or mounted a tire on a split rim, DON'T DO THIS AT HOME!!!!!

Let me say that again.

DO NOT ATTEMPT THIS AT HOME!!!!!!

Split rims can be extremely dangerous and can be deadly if you don't know what you are doing.

Consider the $150.00 a small price to pay balanced against funeral costs or an extended stay in the hospital and rehabilitative expenses.

Mark O.

Castle Rock, WA

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again one more voice will say don't do it.get some one who does it.i have done many of them and hate every one i did.thats why i spent 1800 for the rims for my 64 chevy C60

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A local junk dealer had half of his face ripped off by one!! Fortunately they were able to reattach it and he wasn't that pretty to start with. Go to a tire place and look at the split rim reassembly cage. I can't recall seeing one that isn't all bent up from rims blowing apart in them!!!

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very dangerous ,when we have the odd overseas chassis in the shop the company wont allow j.b. hunt employees to touch them at all .

i have changed them a long time ago without a cage ,i inflated them ring down on the ground with a couple of big log chains around the ring .

there is just no way id fool with them now ,i have 2 boys to get raised .

just not worth it -imo.

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You guys have convinced me. I'll just suck it up and pay the bucks. I guess $150 ain't so bad after all. Thanks for the info. My father and my uncle had told me the same thing, but I needed to hear it from ya'll.

I have to say I can't wait to see this procedure, I hope that they'll let me watch.

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I have done a few.I couple some air hoses together,set the tire a ways from the shop,lock an air chuck on the valve an set the reg about 30 lb and do something else,after a while I'll turn the regulater up couple more times . I woun't inflate them if the grandchildren are around.I try not to teach them some of my habits. P.S. Our 12 year old grand son bagged a not bad mule deer buck yesterday after school close to here.

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I have done my own split rims for quite awhile, :o with some precautions of course. :D The tire store had a very agreeable gent who was a great instructor. For anyone to tackle these without some knowledge can lead to a disaster. With the ability to produce adequate strength rims without the keeper nowadays, they might become museum pieces. :unsure: In this area there are still hundreds rolling down the road every day, it mighty be awhile before they cease to exist.

mike

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I have done my own split rims for quite awhile, :o with some precautions of course. :D The tire store had a very agreeable gent who was a great instructor. For anyone to tackle these without some knowledge can lead to a disaster. With the ability to produce adequate strength rims without the keeper nowadays, they might become museum pieces. :unsure: In this area there are still hundreds rolling down the road every day, it mighty be awhile before they cease to exist.

mike

ditto, so long as the rim is seated correctly it aint a problem, rather easy to knock off & replace a tyre

only split rim i wont touch is the very early split rim that split in the centre, apparently they where called "suicide" rims for a real goo d reason

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ditto, so long as the rim is seated correctly it aint a problem, rather easy to knock off & replace a tyre

only split rim i wont touch is the very early split rim that split in the centre, apparently they where called "suicide" rims for a real goo d reason

I have done a few -_- run them on my 64 IH truck :) can be hard to get the tire off if the rim is rusty :(

like the 3 piece ones the best, run them on the front.

dont put your head over them and use your binder chains wraped around tire and rim :o

early split "suicide" rims is the Goodyear K rim :unsure: have them on the 34 B-3, very easy to take apart and back, but I am not game to put more than a few PSI in them till I have them mounted on the hub :blink: the newest truck I have seen with K's was a L-190, have to ask him how they are done :blush:

best use the tire shop to take them apart first, sand blast and paint with POR15 and then watch the shop do them ;) after that then do them next time yourself ;)

Jake.

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Go buy some tubeless rims at the tire shop, they are cheap in the long run and tires are less expensive too (and plentiful) I priced some for the school some time back to convert from 900x 20 to 10x22.5

I look for the tire companies to eliminate tube types.........it is special order here already.

I bought some used 9.00 x 20 tires for my 78 Loadstar and I have been told by a couple of people that it is very dangerous to change the tires on split rims.

We had several IH's set up with 10x22.5 wheels where I used to work (they were 79 models I believe) sure are easy to change.

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I wouldn't recommend changing tires on split rims if you aren't already familiar with tire changing in general. It can be done without taking your head off but there are things you need to know and see done before doing it. Here is a picture of what you should have to do them safely. Tire hammer, inflation gauge with long whip hose, and inflation cage. I got my cage at an auction for $150. Cleaning up the rim and ring with a powered wire brush is a must IMO and if either piece is rusted through, I wouldn't reuse it.

post-2315-1196301376_thumb.jpg

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If the the pieces are rusted and aren't rusted through I still wouldn't use them. Heavy rust pitting can make the pieces not seat well together. Don't ask me how I know.

Given my druthers, I would always opt for tubeless. It is particularly important for those trucks you will be using far from home.

You really don't want to be out and about and have tire problems.

I have yet to run into any truck tire shop that won't work on split rims but I am sure that day is coming soon.

Mark O.

Castle Rock, WA

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I do several of these each year but have to watch a SAFETY VIDEO bi-annually on all heavy truck tire work. We also still have a lot of loaders and graders with split rims. We have a real nice cage with an auto inflater.

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I worked on tires from my mid teens until I was in my early thirties. Did hundreds of truck rims. Like others have said, I hated each and everyone and have seen several of them blow apart. Not a one of them blew apart in the cage, either, is what was scary. Two of them blew apart with less than 20 pounds of air pressure. At twenty pounds the lock ring ricocheted around the shop like a bullet. Dad was "seating" the bead with a 2 pound hammer when one of them blew, we found the hammer 400 feet from the shop, out by the road later on that week when we were mowing. Some of the others blew apart AFTER they were installed on the truck. Most dangerous of all were the true two piece split rims, that basically relied on a very thin flange of steel to hold the two halves of the rims together. The lock ring types were a little safer but not much. One of the split rim types that blew apart on the truck, dented the truck frame when the free half of the rim hit the frame with 90 PSI of pressure in the tire.

I am 53 now and will never touch another split rim or lock ring style truck rim ever again. I figured I expired 8 of my 9 lives back in my tire man days. I have spent the last 22 years of my life climbing around inside elevator shafts and consider that to be a MUCH safer way of making a living than working on old farm truck rims. :blink::blink:

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If you are a die hard and want to keep the rims, IMHO pay and get it done the safe way. Dads local tire guy will work on them, but to get tires is a special order and he does not stock them anymore. Needles to say the straight trck has been switched over to tubeless.

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One of my old buddies ran a tire shop in the '70's. On the ceiling of his shop, there was a nearly perfect reversed stamping of a 10.00 x 20 Firestone truck tire. He was inflating one of the rims in question when it blew. The ceiling was about 9 ft. The tire was rotating slightly, as the printing is a bit blurred a bit. The tire missed him on the way up, but hit him on the way down. He escaped injury, but I figure he probably had to go home and change his shorts. The old semis I used to drive had those rims. I usually made myself pretty scarce when there was tire work. The owners didn't really want me around anyway, as they knew what they were doing. :P:P

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