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BohemianJon

McCormick No. 7 Sickle Bar Mower

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I acquired an old sickle bar mower in pretty good shape and will be using it to cut along a ditch. Where can I get an Owners Manual, a Parts Lists, and where can I get the parts i might be needing? Also would like to re-paint it in the original color combinations...were any colors used besides red? If so, what color and where was it used on the mower? Thanks!

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Jon,

Your best source for parts will be an Amish community as the price will be better. That said, guards, knifes and sections and pitman stick parts are all the same as the tractor mowers (or can be replaced by tractor mower parts.) The pitman stick itself varies by mower as far as length goes. balsters.net has ptiman sticks shown on their website.

Macknair and Sons will be able to supply a reproduced manual. It is a fairly good manual for part numbers. macknair.com He also has parts for all kinds of old equipment. I have on occasion seen an original on ebay. I use McCormick mowers as the search words.

I would highly recommend the sealed bearing conversion for the driven end of the pitman.

Check the thread one this site Paint Codes http://www.redpowermagazine.com/forums/ind...showtopic=32563 for the link to the WI Historical paint committee decisions. It will take some looking. Basically the body is Harvestor Red, the bar Harvestor Blue and the wheels Harvestor Cream. Colored sales brochures show the Cream to be yellowish. It is not Harvestor White. Note that the #7 was built from 1929 to 1939. The tongue, evener and yoke were all different colors.

I have one 90% apart in order to clean it and rebuild. If you want to ask questions, I know most of the tricks to get it apart, but have not discovered all of the tricks for getting it to run properly. Register and lead adjustment are a little complicated as there is only one adjustment that is apparent. An Amish repairman told me that he sometimes bends the main arm for lead.

The biggest wear area of the drive train is the lower bushing on the pitman shaft. The shaft needs to be removed to replace the bushing and seal.

Do you plan to use draft animals or a self propelled vehicle? I plan on using my Morgan mares if they will be able to deal with the noise.

Steel or rubber wheels?

Neal

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This is dad's #9, he had an Amish guy paint it and the colors are correct. I don't know if the #7 is the same or not. I know if you look up the Wis. Historical Society website, they have all the codes on pretty much everything. The biggest problem we had with ours was soring the horse's necks, they're real tongue heavy, so be sure to pad the tops of your collars real well. ;)post-1633-1194018908_thumb.jpg

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This is dad's #9, he had an Amish guy paint it and the colors are correct. I don't know if the #7 is the same or not. I know if you look up the Wis. Historical Society website, they have all the codes on pretty much everything. The biggest problem we had with ours was soring the horse's necks, they're real tongue heavy, so be sure to pad the tops of your collars real well. ;)post-1633-1194018908_thumb.jpg

Thanks Naedlaen & PhilipC...My No. 7 mower has steel wheels and its my intention to pull it with my Farmall 130. Not sure yet how much work it will need but it looks to be in great shape as it was stored inside. I checked part of the paint specs and the way I understand it...the facing of the wheels were a blue color...I'm not sure what they meant by "facing"...do they mean the edge of the wheel? Any comment? Sure appreciate the info you guys provided. Thanks again. BohmeianJon

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Jon,

The facing is the outside portion that touches the ground. IHC quit painting face bule sometime in the 30's as a cost cutting measure. SO, depending on when your mower was made, it may or may not have had bule faced wheels. Your choice as to how to paint the wheels.

Since these where initially made for animal power, please bear in mind that they were designed for about 3 to 4 mph. The bearings and gears will wear out much faster if you go faster than that. The center of draft is important as well. There is a draft rod that runs from the tongue to the top of the inside shoe to help reduce the side draft. While in may not be as much of an issue with a tractor, I would encourage you to use some means (chain or rod) to put some draft on the inside shoe so that stress is reduced on the main bar and the smaller bar that is in front of the pitman stick.

Neal

(I should start to take photos so I can share)

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Jon,

The facing is the outside portion that touches the ground. IHC quit painting face bule sometime in the 30's as a cost cutting measure. SO, depending on when your mower was made, it may or may not have had bule faced wheels. Your choice as to how to paint the wheels.

Since these where initially made for animal power, please bear in mind that they were designed for about 3 to 4 mph. The bearings and gears will wear out much faster if you go faster than that. The center of draft is important as well. There is a draft rod that runs from the tongue to the top of the inside shoe to help reduce the side draft. While in may not be as much of an issue with a tractor, I would encourage you to use some means (chain or rod) to put some draft on the inside shoe so that stress is reduced on the main bar and the smaller bar that is in front of the pitman stick.

Neal

(I should start to take photos so I can share)

Thanks again Neal...Appreciate your recommendations and I'll try to figure up and follow. This type of mower is "new" to me as I grew up on a fruit/berry/grape farm here in SW Michigan...no fields to cut.

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Following along on this post regarding the Number 7 sickle mower----

I checked my old mower this afternoon and its a Number 7 McCormick Deering. I was surprised to see the Number 7 is as late of production as it is (1929---1939 according to naedlaen above).

I ran up on a couple of similar mowers recently---one is a McCormick an one is an IHC (in the circle)----don't remember the numbers.

Question: at what point in time did things switch over to IHC from McCormick or visa versa???

Oh yeh------all of these are colored rusty and dusty, so I can't help on the original colors---------but they do look like they would match well in my collection of scrap iron.

Thanks----

Delta Dirt

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Jon;

I thought I might add my 2 cents. If you want more info on your mower you might try the "Small Farmers Journal" located in Sisters, Oregon. Try 541-2064 or 541-549-4183, they have all kinds of parts books and operators manuals. They also publish a magazine every 3 months. Get one of those magazines and it will have all kinds of information and ads from different vendors. Good Luck jw

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