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chub

JOHN DEERE PULL TYPE 7721

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The first picture in this post is of Grandfather Hamilton in the grain tank of his Curtiss combine, being pulled by an Allis Chalmers tractor (for Wilman).

The second is of Sharon's Grandfather Jeff Simpson, near Moore(Eddies Corner), Montana, pulling a Holt steel combine with a Rumely Oilpull.

The third in this post is of a Holt steam engine pulling a Holt combined harvester with a 50' header in Montana.

The last is a postcard of mine showing a 32hp Reeves pulling a combined harvester, also here in Montana.

The fifth picture is of Art Johnson's 36hp Peerless pulling a combined harvester near Benchland, in Montana's Judith Basin.

The sixth is of an 80hp Best 6-cylinder gas tractor pulling a combined harvester.

The seventh is of a Reeves 25hp cross compound steam engine pulling a wooden combined harvester in the Judith Basin.

The eighth is of another different 25hp cross compound Reeves pulling another different combined harvester in the Judith Basin.

Gary ;)

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Magicmikey,

That is a neat old W-6 McCormick standard there, with the steel wheels. I knew they were available, but I never saw one in person and I can't say I have another picture of one. The old Massey-Harris is a neat looking old combine as well. They were dumping grain on the ground, it appears.

Gary ;)

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chub,

I found one more while cleaning out my files here at work. It is a companion photo to one earlier that had the ladies riding on the combined harvester behind a big old 35hp Nichols & Shepard steam engine over in the Judith Basin. Notice what the condensation with soot and steam oil in it, coming from the smokestack, did to the camera lens! Steam engines will also do that to light colored shirts AND DRESSES.

Gary ;)

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OBG: Great pics of the old combines!! What a performace getting some of those old rigs to the field and get some harvest done.

As a kid, my big job was to pump the handle on the old grease bucket while Dad greased the zerks on his old Case K12 ( I think) pull-type, and later, his brand spanking new 65 JD, bought in 1956. He pulled the JD with his pristine Co-op E4 (Cockshutt 40). Now that was a smooth running pair of engines, if there ever was one! I can still remember how high up off the ground that nice Hercules engine was on the JD. I would like to have one of those in my back yard, so I could go out and fire it up once in a while. And maybe a Buda, and a D282 as well!! :P:P

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Thanks Mike for posting that for me. That is my farthers W6 on Steel/massey 17 combo It harvested a large acreage in those days as there was no manpower for theshing;WW2.Tractors were only available on steel at that time.The W6 was changed to rubber later as most were.Massey had some direct conections with the canadian gov Ihave heard and was able to obtain some rubber tires and the was one of them. There was a photo years ago of this same outfit picking up a very heavy crop of oats with a 'redneck live pto" .A W9 was powering the combine and the 6 on steel was pulling it at low rpm and riding the clutch.My father was on the feederhouse with a pitchfork helping the long straw around the bend from the canvas to the feederhouse.I wish I could find that photo

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Thanks Mike for posting that for me. That is my farthers W6 on Steel/massey 17 combo It harvested a large acreage in those days as there was no manpower for theshing;WW2.Tractors were only available on steel at that time.The W6 was changed to rubber later as most were.Massey had some direct conections with the canadian gov Ihave heard and was able to obtain some rubber tires and the was one of them. There was a photo years ago of this same outfit picking up a very heavy crop of oats with a 'redneck live pto" .A W9 was powering the combine and the 6 on steel was pulling it at low rpm and riding the clutch.My father was on the feederhouse with a pitchfork helping the long straw around the bend from the canvas to the feederhouse.I wish I could find that photo

JohnR, great old photo of that W6 on steel. Most I 've seen were on rubber although I do recall one guy that put steel on his for breaking bushland to save puncturing the rubber tires. That Massey combine is familiar too. In fact I think there is one similar sitting in a field a mile from me.

I"d never heard of the "redneck pto" idea before, but can see how it would work. Good thing gas was cheap in those days. My Dad had a similar idea with the Wisconsin powered Case model A combine behind his John Deere D. The old D could idle along in first gear if need be, while the little V4 on the combine raced at full rpm to put through a heavy swath. I recall him using that method when he had hired a neighbour with this huge 15 foot swather to swath oats. Putting that much material through the little Case combine was a challenge. I can still see Dad leaping off the D to grab the lever back by the Wisconsin to dis-engage the belt after it had plugged the cylinder, hoping to avoid stalling the little Wisconsin. That V4 could be stubborn and unpredictable to start at times so he hated to let it stop once it was running. :(

Heres a picture from later years , my dad beside one of the better combines we had to harvest with for a few years. I'll never forget the straight piped music coming from that GM 350 engine. ;)

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Ralf; I never ran 510.but there was lots around here. Didn't the early ones have a 327 engine? A large farm in this area had 5 Massey 510.s ' 3 GM grain trucks and one or two pickups all with that engine so he kept a spare on hand.I heard the back beater was a big problem if it pluged as the was no access to it.We changed colors after the super 92's so had no experience with 510's,but a lot of big farms had them

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Ralf; I never ran 510.but there was lots around here. Didn't the early ones have a 327 engine? A large farm in this area had 5 Massey 510.s ' 3 GM grain trucks and one or two pickups all with that engine so he kept a spare on hand.I heard the back beater was a big problem if it pluged as the was no access to it.We changed colors after the super 92's so had no experience with 510's,but a lot of big farms had them

Hi John, you are quite right, the early 510s had the 327 but the later Western Specials had the 350. I can't say much bad about the 510 as it served me well. The one time I can recall plugging that rear beater in tough durum wheat straw, I can also recall spending some time laying on the straw walkers with a keyhole saw cutting straw off the beater. Not a pleasant experience but thankfully, rare.

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Have had the 510 "experience". A layer of old carpeting to lay on or even 2 were better. More than once here. It was a "Jonar" on that combine to us. We had a Diesel.

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I was ruhhing a jd 105 for a friend and stopped for fuel and grub about dusk.Going up the ladder I could smell smoke and after a long serch could see a faint hint of smoke lined up with the faint glowto the west. Finnaly figered it must be in the raddle chain under the cyl.This was one of the rare ones with variable speed cyl and the large cast mounting bracket for that covered the door to that area.We were 30 miles from home,now dark and not enough tools to remove all that.By now the smoke had quite ,it was 11 pm,so I parked it on bare ground,asked if it was insured and drove home.It was still there next morning

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john r: I was moving my outfit, a 660 IH and 96 JD, one time, and must have tossed out a cigarette to land in the header somewhere. I noticed smoke trailing out the back end. I pulled in to a farmer's yard and we unravelled his garden hose, fired the old JD up and gave her a really good drink. We couldn't see just exactly where the smoke was originating from, but soaked her down good inside then proceeded to where I was to end up, parked ithe outfit in a summerfallow field for the night. It seemd to do the trick. A little scary, though. :P:P

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About 27 years ago, I was running my Massey-Ferguson 760 with Perkins V-8 diesel and hydrostat, and son Mike was running my C-II Gleaner. I was right behind him and he yelled on the CB that he smelled smoke. I pulled out and sped up to where he was and he was outside with his 10 lb extinguisher. I grabbed mine and ran toward him. A sealed bearing in the feeder house of the C-II had just gone bad. It was all aglow and smoldering in the chaff and would have flashed fire any second, but didn't. We put it out, but it was terribly dry and everything would have gone in an instant, had he ignored it a few more seconds.

Gary ;)

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noticed that old binder guy hasnt been shot,hung, drawn or quartered :D

so found these in a old cupboard, old buyers guides, have a 1977 IHC Aust guide, so when i get a sapre 5mins will scan a few more

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noticed that old binder guy hasnt been shot,hung, drawn or quartered :D

so found these in a old cupboard, old buyers guides, have a 1977 IHC Aust guide, so when i get a sapre 5mins will scan a few more

Nice one Ozfrm. I can see a definite resemblance to our Massey pull types of the 70s. Interesting how they refer to the whole combine as a "header". Here that term only applies to the actual cutting table. Most combines here have two headers. A direct cut (like my 1010 IH) or the pickup header (IH 1015).

Different countries, different terms.

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loadstar

where the terminolgy header came from was how we used to distinguish between the early strippers :D & the later header,

for those who are conjuring up vivid mental pictures what will unfold is gunna disappoint ya :P

early harvesters didnt use a knife to cut the heads, they used a stripper

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Here's a pic of my John Deere 96 pull-type behind the 660. It was just starting off, picking up wheat. The fellow in the yellow hard hat was one of my best buddies, as was his brother, who was likely running the outfit. I would have taken the picture, and I can't think of who else was standing there, unless it was my girlfriend, or maybe me, and she took the pic. Besides, does it really matter now?? When this pic was taken, the old 660 wasn't turbo'd yet and would likley have had a straight pipe. That old girl sure sounded nice at full tilt in a good swath of wheat, especially in the evening when the sounds seem so much sweeter. From the back, all you could hear from the combine was the hum of the separator fan and the hissing of the straw chopper. I can still feel the chaff and straw pouring in the cab windows, settling on my neck. I'd give anything to be able to go back and pick up that swath in that field again. Those were really good times. :P:P

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This is another of my Dad's combines. Loadstar or somebody - please help me on the model?? A K12??? He would have likely bought this one brand new during WWII. He traded it off in 1956 for a new 65 JD. I can remember Dad throwing my cap in the old Case one time when they were working on it in the yard. I was the official grease pumper when I was out at the farm. :P:P

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Here's a pic of my John Deere 96 pull-type behind the 660. It was just starting off, picking up wheat. . From the back, all you could hear from the combine was the hum of the separator fan and the hissing of the straw chopper. I can still feel the chaff and straw pouring in the cab windows, settling on my neck. I'd give anything to be able to go back and pick up that swath in that field again. Those were really good times. :P:P

Good shot of the 96 Kjohn. Just the way I remember them. I helped a friend pull his 65 JD home from Indian Head back in 72. That was a long drive on an open 3020,(about 40 miles).

Hope I haven't already posted this one before but it was taken in the spring (April) of 52. Not winter wheat but some of the 51 crop that didn't get finished in the fall of 51. The swaths laid out all winter and were surprisingly good and dry by the time Dad and Uncle got to combine them.

Uncle's LA Case on Dad's model A combine and the D was there for back up when the going got tough. Biggest problem was that although the wheat was dry, the ground was still quite muddy in places.

Springtime combining, I"ve only done it once, hopefully never again.

This is another of my Dad's combines. Loadstar or somebody - please help me on the model?? A K12??? He would have likely bought this one brand new during WWII. He traded it off in 1956 for a new 65 JD. I can remember Dad throwing my cap in the old Case one time when they were working on it in the yard.

Kjohn, this combine in your pic is similar to the K12 but I'd say its older. The high mounted engine and round hopper are different from the K12. I've got a K12 sitting in the bush , even got the operators manual around here somewhere. They had the lower mounted Case engine sitting just behind and a bit higher than the header. Square type hopper and non-enclosed left wheel.

Thats great to have old harvest pictures from your farm. I don't think combines appeared on this farm til about 1950. It was all threshing machines up til then.

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Here's another of my Dad's pull-type combines. It looks like a "six-foot" Case?? Dad had very little good to say about that combine. My Dad could very "clearly" describe a machine that he didn't like. There was never any doubt about what he meant. He had a "Grain Saver" self-propelled swather, made in Manitoba by Kilbery Industries. 1961 was the first year I was able to help him at harvest, because it was a dry year and harvest started before school was back in. During swathing, my job was to listen carefully while he was out in the field. If I couldn't hear the old swather, or, worse, could hear him yelling, I was to hightail it out with the old 1950 Mercury one-ton and give the swather a pull. It was powered by a Wisconsin V-4 and was hard to start. (My Dad put it several other ways, none of which I can print here!) He finally got fed up and bought a brand new IH 201 swather, a high quality machine with a C-153. I can still see poor old Dad standing beside that old Grain Saver, waiting for me to pull up. :P:P

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I found this picture of Van Childers' Case combine and tractor. I know nothing about them, except the little lady on the tractor is daughter Doris and she is the mother of a good friend of mine at Whitefish. The picture was taken north of Great Falls on the highline somewhere south of Havre.

Gary ;)

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chub,

I had the other side of this same outfit on here last week. This is my wife's grandpa Jefferson Davis Simpson at left and his oldest son Ralph on the ground. I don't know who the person header man is at the "ship's wheel?" I'm not smart enough to know what model of Rumely Oilpull lightweight that is. I know they didn't use that webbed flywheel too many years, as it radiated sounds from the engine that didn't need radiated, so they went back to a spoked flywheel again. ADDED: Another picture of the same outfit.

Gary ;)

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I can remember Dad throwing my cap in the old Case one time when they were working on it in the yard. I was the official grease pumper when I was out at the farm. :P:P

Kjohn, I meant to comment on the hat last night. I recall a farm writer telling a story about a farmer who had the custom of throwing his straw hat into the feeder when he finished combining each year. Kind of a celebratory gesture I guess. And straw hats were likely cheap then too. :lol:

Also , re: Kilberry, another old name in self propelled swathers. I'm not sure if they might have gone on to become Macdon?? Somewhere here I have a picture of a friend with his first swather, a self propelled Kilberry complete with the little Wisconsin V4 powerplant. It was a step up at the time but I"d sure hate to go back to swathing with one of them now.

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Loadstar: The cap eventually came out the back, relatively unscathed. That was another huge revelation to me, one of many that my Dad foisted on me. I can only barely remember the old Kilberry. It was, of course, second hand. It seemed to be a real mess of spinning wheels, rattling chains, flapping canvases, and of course, the old Wisconsin whining and barking away (when it ran!). I do remember the nice shiny new IH 201, with electric start, nice sounding engine, and.... an umbrella!! After Dad put a cab on the 660, we only had one tractor, so the umbrella went on the swather. Boy, did I think I was a big operator running that machine. :P:P

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