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chub

JOHN DEERE PULL TYPE 7721

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I 'm trying to post some old b&w pto pictures but can't get them reduced to a size that will post. One picture is my father about 1944 with a W6 on steel pulling a massey 17. The steel wheels shine like mirrors. He combined a lot of acres with that outfit as combines were scarce as was manpower to thresh during ww2.

John, I hope you can get those pictures posted as they would be a good addition to this thread. I'd say send them to me and I'd downsize them, but I'm only on dial up internet here so if they are too big it would take forever to get them into my mailbox. Maybe someone else on the forum can help out?

Gary,, I think you'd have to look at the specification plate to tell the difference between the 15-30 and a 22-36. As far as I know it was just a horsepower increase and no obvious external changes. I'm pretty sure the one in my yard has 22-36 on the plate. I will check if I don't forget by the time I get outside. ;)

I guess I'll add another pic of the 460, taken back about 1978 just after I had a cab installed on the 930. I figured I had it made then. No more dust, wind, or cold to deal with. Just that unpredictable combine that would plug the cylinder with no warning. Those were the days before I knew about the wonders of spray on belt dressing on the main drive belt. It sure smartened that combine up once I started using that.

Picking up a 15 foot swath of spring wheat. If memory serves me I was usually in second gear with the 930, first, or riding the clutch in the heavy spots. B)

Second pic was as good as it got with the 460 combine behind the 2090 tractor. I'd traded the 930 on the 2090 that spring (still miss that 930), and used the 2090 to pull the combine for part of the harvest. I don't think it improved the combine's performance but at least I rode in comfort.

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Another question for you guys.

Will a 6 row 30" corn head clear the tongue on one of those 7721's?

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Well nobody yelled at me the last time.

I'll start this with a "JOHN DEERE PULL TYPE" combine.

The second is another of the "15-30" 22-36 tractors pulling one of our old Advance Rumely combine harvesters.

The third is a clearer photo of Dad pulling the McCormick Deering combine.

The last is of a 110hp Best pulling a 185 Holt Combined Harvester in California. By the way, whether it looks it or not, this photo is less than 15 years old!

Old Binder Guy

Gary ;)

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Another picture of my dad pulling a Rumely with a "15-30" (22-36?). This was obvioulsy a field on flat ground, as there is only one tractor.

The second is another of one of the Rumely combines, but a later photo, pulled by a TD-9 TracTracTor and the truck is a K-5 IH truck.

The third is another steam scene in the Judith Basin of a 35hp Nichols & Shepard steam engine pulling a wooden Combined Harvester and notice the ladies all dressed up in their Sunday's best for a ride to see the latest technology in operation.

Another McCormick Deering combine picture.

Plenty of IHC Tractors and combines in operation in Montana. I think this may have been from the Campbell Farms at Hardin, Montana. At the time, they were the largest wheat farm in the world.

Gary ;)

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I 'm trying to post some old b&w pto pictures but can't get them reduced to a size that will post. One picture is my father about 1944 with a W6 on steel pulling a massey 17. The steel wheels shine like mirrors. He combined a lot of acres with that outfit as combines were scarce as was manpower to thresh during ww2.

John, I hope you can get those pictures posted as they would be a good addition to this thread. I'd say send them to me and I'd downsize them, but I'm only on dial up internet here so if they are too big it would take forever to get them into my mailbox. Maybe someone else on the forum can help out?

Gary,, I think you'd have to look at the specification plate to tell the difference between the 15-30 and a 22-36. As far as I know it was just a horsepower increase and no obvious external changes. I'm pretty sure the one in my yard has 22-36 on the plate. I will check if I don't forget by the time I get outside. ;)

I guess I'll add another pic of the 460, taken back about 1978 just after I had a cab installed on the 930. I figured I had it made then. No more dust, wind, or cold to deal with. Just that unpredictable combine that would plug the cylinder with no warning. Those were the days before I knew about the wonders of spray on belt dressing on the main drive belt. It sure smartened that combine up once I started using that.

Picking up a 15 foot swath of spring wheat. If memory serves me I was usually in second gear with the 930, first, or riding the clutch in the heavy spots. B)

Second pic was as good as it got with the 460 combine behind the 2090 tractor. I'd traded the 930 on the 2090 that spring (still miss that 930), and used the 2090 to pull the combine for part of the harvest. I don't think it improved the combine's performance but at least I rode in comfort.

Ralph,

I know there wasn't much more difference between a 15-30 and a 22-36 than there is between a F-12 and a F-14. The only visible difference in them is the steering shaft is angled on the F-14.

Boy Ralph, those are some fantastic pictures of your Case tractors and pull type combines. You can sure see a difference in times, with the difference in pictures. I don't blame you for missing that 930 Case. They were a great tractor.

Thanks again for all the great pictures you have chronicled you farm life with!

Gary ;)

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Thanks for all who have posted the pictures. The steam traction engines with the combines, are something I have never seen before. Threshing, yes, but pulling something other than plows, never.

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1967806... am pretty sure the tractor was a 4850. Also as I said a 5 row corn head that I have not seen on the machine or otherwise. Whether this went on with out "blacksmithing", I do not know. Maybe I'll get to see that run this fall too. The field of beans I was in was their last to cut, so am sure they are in corn now.

I do remember well the shinning up of the steel wheels in the stubble and the grooves on the underside of the cutter bar.

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Gary, a friend of mine from high school, his dad was a cowboy for Campbell Farms for about 20 years. My friend grew up out there and came back to Michigan in 1989. I love listening to the stories he tells about being out. One story in particular he told was about them having a 1920's Stutz Bearcat in a garage that had barely been driven.

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Gary, a friend of mine from high school, his dad was a cowboy for Campbell Farms for about 20 years. My friend grew up out there and came back to Michigan in 1989. I love listening to the stories he tells about being out. One story in particular he told was about them having a 1920's Stutz Bearcat in a garage that had barely been driven.

Snowman,

I'm likely going to catch heck for derailing this thread. Here are some pictures from the Campbell farms in Montana. The 30-60 Aultman Taylors in the first three pictures were Hardin tractors.

First picture shows fourteen 30-60 Aultman-Taylor gas tractors plowing a section (640 acres) in one day. Also, purportedly there were no stops "due to the tractors." A&T advertizing department had a hand in this too. They purportedly had 20 to 22 of these A&T tractors at Hardin. I have watched video (from Tom Campbell's 16mm moving picture film) of these tractors plowing, pulling a bunch of wooden combined harvesters (There!!! something to do with this thread?) and one of a 110hp Case turning a huge Case threshing machine. There were four bundle wagons pitching bundles... Then the darn strawstack caught on fire! They'd left a chain on the hitch of the threshing machine and were able to hook onto the chain and retrieve it from the fire. (My dad also burned a strawstack and an A&T wooden threshing machine one harvest.)

The second picture shows four of the A&Ts pulling binders at harvest time.

The third picture shows some of the A&Ts lined up at the Hardin headquarters. A friend of mine bought a bunch of those round front radiators that were setting in Hardin, after the tractors were scrapped out.

The 20-40 Case gas tractors in the last photo were at the Crow Agency camp. I don't know what they used on their two Texas wheat farms. The car at right in the Crow Agency picture just COULD be the Stutz Bearcat you speak of?

SORRY...Now back to pull type combines...

Gary ;)

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I'm likely going to catch heck for derailing this thread. Here are some pictures from the Campbell farms in Montana. The 30-60 Aultman Taylors in the first three pictures were Hardin tractors.

There is one of campbells A&T tractors at the Big Horn County museum alomg with some buildings and an interpretive display of Tom campbells farming style. Don't know if the A&T will get a resto but I know some guys who were searching the coulees for any other A&T hulks.

BTW I am a Hardin boy.

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and one of a 110hp Case turning a huge Case threshing machine. There were four bundle wagons pitching bundles... Then the darn strawstack caught on fire! They'd left a chain on the hitch of the threshing machine and were able to hook onto the chain and retrieve it from the fire. (My dad also burned a strawstack and an A&T wooden threshing machine one harvest.)

SORRY...Now back to pull type combines...

Gary ;)

Gary, those stubblefield/straw stack fires were probably most threshermen's worst nightmare's . I think it was the first or second year that my grandfather's had their Aultman Taylor/IHC threshing outfit that a prairie fire came along and burned it to the ground when nobody was around. I know the exact spot in the field where it happened and can remember finding a charred piece of wood that was likely a part of that wooden threshing machine. A tough break for starting farmers but they got enough together to make down payments on another threshing outfit.

To add to the pull type combine thread I have this fairly rare advertising picture of a 1482 with the direct cut header. It was listed as 17.5 feet. I can't imagine that they ever sold many of these headers , I've certainly never seen one. Trying to keep an 80 series combine full on a 17 foot cut of cereal grain is really not feasible in this country. You'd have to drive at a tremendous speed and I doubt the header auger could handle it then. Back in 89 when a neighbour helped me combine with his 1482 he was picking up my 21 foot swath of an average durum wheat crop. He was really cruising to keep that 1482 full and of course pickup speed is the limiting factor in that situation. As long as its a good swath sitting up on the stubble you can fly but if its a rained on, beaten down swath, thats a different story.

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I know a farmer north of me who runs a 914.He rebuild a 17 foot 820 flex head to cut beans.Saw a JD 7701 i think with a 454 row crop head cutting beans a few years back by Brookings South Dakota.

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Guys,I've sure enjoyed this thread and all the old pictures.Thanks Chub for starting it.

Blaine, have thought of you as this thread goes along. Wonder if somewhere out there there might be someone like you collecting combines...only pull types. Hope as time goes on your collection can stay together and be preserved. These things are slipping away from us. Was dissapointed when it was said that the Rumley @ Penfield was not being shedded. No doubt there are still examples of such but the "scrap-hounds" are rapidly picking them up for a quick turn, chub.

What is so unusual about the Hahn 7721 is that it is still actively in use and part of a farming operation.

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Guys,I've sure enjoyed this thread and all the old pictures.Thanks Chub for starting it.

Blaine, have thought of you as this thread goes along. Wonder if somewhere out there there might be someone like you collecting combines...only pull types. Hope as time goes on your collection can stay together and be preserved. These things are slipping away from us. Was dissapointed when it was said that the Rumley @ Penfield was not being shedded. No doubt there are still examples of such but the "scrap-hounds" are rapidly picking them up for a quick turn, chub.

What is so unusual about the Hahn 7721 is that it is still actively in use and part of a farming operation.

Chub,there are several people collecting old pull type combines.They are scattered around and most only have a few but several have quite a bunch from what I hear.Probably the most collected are the All Crop AC's.The earlier-bigger PT combines are hard to haul and store so not many have been saved.

If I can add the following to my collection in 2008 I will have the nucleus of a pretty decent collection of early SP combines.

1 SP-12 Case

2 Oliver 35-40

3 Early 55 JD

4 Early A Gleaner with Ford or Hercules engine

I know where all of these can be bought but $3.00 diesel makes me not want to haul them 300-500 miles home.

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Was dissapointed when it was said that the Rumley @ Penfield was not being shedded. No doubt there are still examples of such but the "scrap-hounds" are rapidly picking them up for a quick turn, chub.

What is so unusual about the Hahn 7721 is that it is still actively in use and part of a farming operation.

I wasnt very clear in my late night post earlier. The Avery is being well cared for (and shedded) It has had water leak (bad radiator core) but it might have gotten fixed this year or last. Sorry for the confusion!

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And I am glad I mis-understood you as to the care it is receiving, the Avery that is.!!!

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At the salvage south of North battleford sk there were several "Rotothresh"sp combines that got baled up when the yard changed management.They were an early attemt at the rotary combine by a Saskatoon sk company.I hope one or two were saved. I don't know if one of the Western development museums has one or not.

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Did a google search on rotothresh and got just this one answer on a April 2007 sale with a example with a seized engine on same. Hopefully it was saved......odds are it was not or ended up in a demo derby, the fate of lots of nice old combines.

http://www.californiaauctionguide.com/cgi-...anum=1166334647

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I know a farmer north of me who runs a 914.He rebuild a 17 foot 820 flex head to cut beans.Saw a JD 7701 i think with a 454 row crop head cutting beans a few years back by Brookings South Dakota.

Yes, not to forget the IH 914. Easily as popular as any of the other makes back about 20 years ago.

At the salvage south of North battleford sk there were several "Rotothresh"sp combines that got baled up when the yard changed management.They were an early attemt at the rotary combine by a Saskatoon sk company.I hope one or two were saved. I don't know if one of the Western development museums has one or not.

And that Roto thresh was quite an innovative design in it's day. I think they first showed up in the early seventies. Never really caught on though. I don't know if it was the same company that built the "roto brush pickup" but my Uncle had one of those pickups installed on his JD 95. I don't think it was too successful as he replaced it with a Sund pickup. The roto brush was just a big 8 foot long nylon bristle brush on a roller that rotated, kind of like a street sweeper and picked up the swath.

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I didn't know the rotothresh got as far as Ca. but shoudn't be surprised as we see a lot of Canadian made equipment is the US when we travel south in winter.Seeders,rockpickers.heavy harrows,blades,sprayers and of course swathers.Macdon has a dealer in Yuma.I think most of the companys have branches and some have US plants. BTW; I think the last JD pto combines were built at the old CCIL plant in Winnipeg Mb and I saw several colors of discer seedboxes outside the Noble blade plant at Nobleford Ab

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CHUB, THERE WAS A 7721 THAT SOLD IN A SALE EAST OF KOKOMO LAST FRIDAY. HAD A 15 BEAN HEAD AND WAS IN EXCELLANT CONDITION. THE GUY THAT HAD THE SALE HAD JUST FINISHED DOING HIS FALL CROPS ABOUT TWO WEEKS AGO. IT BROUGHT $6100.00.

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And I was the guy that thought I'd seen something unique to Indiana!!!

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chub,

Do you mind some more historic pictures? I know... There's not a lot you can say about it now???

Gary ;)

The first is a picture of a Holt steam traction engine pulling a "steam propelled" combined harvester in California. There is a steam hose behind the driver wheel that enters the "engine house" on the harvester, propelling the inner harvesting works.

The rest are from the Judith Basin, or near it, anyway... where I grew up.

The second picture is of Leo Horan's Hart-Parr (he owned three of them) 30-60 "Old Reliable" oil tractor pulling a combined harvester in the Buffalo, Montana area.

The third is a picture that my dad may have taken? I know he talked about being there this day in 1910, when they were trying out the new combined harvester that could harvest "all in one operation" at what is now the Lewistown Airport. The engine belonged to Reeves Agent, Ben Hollenback, and the demo was put on at his brother in-law, Herman Otten's place. My uncle Frank later became a brother in-law with both Otten and Hollenback. My dad was just 11 years old, but was already in the process of becoming a licensed Montana Steam Traction Engineer. somewhere I have a companion photo showing the wagon that was pulled alongside the combined harvester, where the bulk grain flowed down that chute shown. It appears they stopped to change wagons and water up the engine.

The fourth picture is of the same engine and combined harvester, but obviously at a later date, due to the "canopy" on the harvester. Those look like some neat old cars too!

The fifth picture is one taken in the Fort Benton(the world's innermost port), Montana area. The tractor pulling the combined harvester is a Big Four 30.

Gary ;)

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Well, I didn't get scolded or my fingers chopped off for that...

This first picture is from the Dupuyer, Montana area. That sure is a tiny little horse PUSHED combine.

The second is A Mehmke Collection photo showing a horse powered ground drive Combined Harvester.

The third is a popular picture. This is from my postcard and I kind of chopped off that combined harvester on the right. There are five combined harvesters and a whole big bunch of horses. How would you like to be the harness installer each morning, with these outfits? NOT me.

The fourth is another Mehmke Collection picture postcard of another horse drawn combined harvester. This one has the high perch teamster, as the ones in my postcard of five have.

The last is a Holt combined harvester BUT..... The horses ran away. Oh no... This one is an early Holt wooden self-propelled combined harvester. Sorry chub... I know it doesn't belong here. Sorry. :rolleyes:

Gary ;)

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