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chub

JOHN DEERE PULL TYPE 7721

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Those big Versatiles had as much capacity as most of the big sp now.They just needed to built them alot stouter.The cyd was a large diameter &7 feet wide, the unload auger turned 180 degrees.With a big versitile up front you just picked a gear in the morning and left it there.

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Western Canada was an absolute heaven for pull-type combines. My Dad had several, the last one being the first "roundback" 96 John Deere in our area. It was a great old combine, simple in construction, very easy to operate, easy to fix. We combined thousands of acres with it and it eventually simply wore out. I ran it with my old turbo'd 660 and made that old 282 take good notice in a nice swath of wheat. I can still recall working late at night and listening to the old auger fingers "chuck-a-chuck chuck-a-chuck" and the straw chopper hissing as it was firing the straw out the back. For those who "can't see any use" for a pull-type, you will have to ask the thousands of owners how they struggled along with them. IIRC, the 96 cost Dad about $6500 in 1962 or '63, while a 95 SP was around $10,000. We swathed everything, so a small header was not an issue. Where possible, we swathed the first round backwards, elimnating the problem of the unloading auger being a nuisance. We also picked up swaths back and forth in the later years, making it much simpler for the poor truck driver. We hauled grain way with our faithful old 1950 Mercury one ton, a hopper at a time. Guess what boys??? We made money at it too!! :P:P

Kjohn, I couldn't have said it better myself. I never got to work the big 96 JD but did help a friend harvest with his smaller 65 JD. Behind the 4020 power shift it made a good combination and we'd even unload on the go with me running the 2010 on the 150 bushel hopper wagon. There were a lot of those green pull types around in those days. Including the big model 106 that only the really big farmers owned.

Heres a pic of what I drove back then. That 460 Case was no load for the 730 tractor and I can remember bending a crowbar trying to unplug the cylinder far too often.

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Got this goofed up, will try again, chub

The Versitile combine that Ralph put the picture of on this thread reminds me of seeing a toy like that and a Versitile tractor for sale @ a IH dealers some years ago for $300.00. Thought it too much but always wished I'd have done different. Would like to see one of these to get a better idea as to how it works. Truly a different concept. Also Ralph's Case PT is something I never saw in this area.

OZ Farm's "header" is interesting too. More of a stripper type concept and headers that do that are used in the US in Rice fields and in small grain out west I understand. Never seen them in this area. The draper head is the new thing..............first made by McDon [Canadien?] and now Deere and IH have copy-cats I am told. Increased capacity I am old. The "reel" in the platform is different to me too.

Have always had an affinity for pull types and worked around several different ones. One reason I so wanted to see the 7721 run. Glad I put the pictures on here and got the benifit of all the different directions we have went with this on the subject of pull type combines. Thanks to all, chub

PS It would be my opinion that you would go a long ways in the corn belt to see a PT of this age and size run.

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Here's a couple more red PT pictures of a 5488 pulling a 1482 during wheat harvest a couple of years ago in northwestern Minn. A 1460 is in the background of the 2nd picture.

Dave

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To go back a ways in the discussion to capacity. I had a 1482 in a field with N6 Gleaners and couldn't keep up to them. I boiled the 1568 trying. Once I put the 7288 out in front it was a different machine.

Chub: I think the first Massey 21's had draper headers. Lots of new stuff has been around before. I am not sure if Macdon or Honey came up with the first draper header this time around.

I remember a neighbour running a 140 IH PT with an 830 JD. It was one of the first tractors around with a cab and I asked him how he liked it. His comment was it was nice except for combineing as it shut out the sounds from the machine. In those days that was all the monitor anyone had.

Speaking of monitors. On the 03 series IH's the return elevator drive was just out of site behind the grain tank. I have seen a lot of 03's with a piece of metal bolted to the drive sprocket so the operator could tell when the return stopped.

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Here's a couple more red PT pictures of a 5488 pulling a 1482 during wheat harvest a couple of years ago in northwestern Minn. A 1460 is in the background of the 2nd picture.

Dave

Dave , those are some nice action shots , especially the 5488 and 1482. I notice the tractor has what appears to be rotary air screens on the hood to contend with the dust from the combine. I wish I had a few more working pics of my 460. Chub,, the 460 was actually the last of the true Case pull types. I think they were built up to the early seventies when Case was sold to Tenneco and the combine line gradually disappeared. Case had a long history of pull types. There is still an old model K sitting in the bush on my uncle's farm. My Dad's first combine was a little six foot Case model A powered by Wisconsin V4.

As 7288CDN stated, I know Honeybee (Sask. built) was right in there with the first of the draper headers and they are still quite popular around here although Macdon is catching up.

Heres a pic of the Case Model A my Dad had back in the early sixties. Its a draper header too. ;)

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Some posts back, someone mentioned a 42 combine. IH made a 42, 52, 64, 76, 80, and 82, all pull types. There may have been more that I do not remember. The 42 and 52 I think were maybe 5 foot cut. The 64 and later were 6 foot cut, maybe you could get a wider platform I do not remember.

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Some posts back, someone mentioned a 42 combine. IH made a 42, 52, 64, 76, 80, and 82, all pull types. There may have been more that I do not remember. The 42 and 52 I think were maybe 5 foot cut. The 64 and later were 6 foot cut, maybe you could get a wider platform I do not remember.

Paul

Just checked my 1964 IH buyers guide when the two pull type combines offered were the model 80 and the slightly bigger 150

It shows a 7 foot auger type header for the 80 but the big model 150 has optional 9 or 12 foot

tables. I can recall a few 150 models but never seen the little 80. The 150, at 32 inch cylinder width would likely have been in the same class as the JD 65 and Case 460, Massey 405.

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I got to Ride with the Haan Brothers and I was amazed that the 7721 was able to run twice the speed as the 9600 cutting beans

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Some posts back, someone mentioned a 42 combine. IH made a 42, 52, 64, 76, 80, and 82, all pull types. There may have been more that I do not remember. The 42 and 52 I think were maybe 5 foot cut. The 64 and later were 6 foot cut, maybe you could get a wider platform I do not remember.

There was also a #62 pt combine. Dad had two, both with Continental engines, no PTO drive...one to run and another for parts to keep #1 running. I think they were 5 ft cut, maybe 6 ft. I know BOOG remembers them well too!

A #25 JD replaced BOTH 62's and We got much more done.....few years later a #30 replaced the 25.... Nice little combine comparable to the 76, 80, & 82 IH's. Worked real nice behind something with a T/A.

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Some posts back, someone mentioned a 42 combine. IH made a 42, 52, 64, 76, 80, and 82, all pull types. There may have been more that I do not remember. The 42 and 52 I think were maybe 5 foot cut. The 64 and later were 6 foot cut, maybe you could get a wider platform I do not remember.

42/42R is 4' cut, 52R (never was a plain 52) is 5'. THe 52R was essentially identical to the 42 from the cylinder back.

I'll have to post some of my 52R pics from this summer.... B)

Al

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I got to Ride with the Haan Brothers and I was amazed that the 7721 was able to run twice the speed as the 9600 cutting beans

Have you seen the combine operate in corn?

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Does the larger newer ones have a movable hitch for roading or does it just hang off to the right hand side? I'd figure it would have something like a haybine or moco has where it swings in behind the tractor.

Keep the pics coming of these pull types. I'm really enjoying this so far.

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I know with the 6601 you could switch the angle of the hitch to bring it closer to the center of the tractor so it wasn't so far off to the right. Most of the time we didn't do it though because it was a pita.

My bil had a versatile pt combine and he liked it. He wore it right out though. He ran it with his massy 4wd.

Ryan

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I'll probably get yelled at, putting these pull type combine photos here? The first two are of one of Grandpa's neighbors, at one time, in the Judith Basin of Montana. The steam engine is a "Big Forty" Reeves Canadian Special pulling some type of wooden combined harvester, likely Holt or Best. I have one account saying the header was 36' in width and another stating it was 35'. The third picture is of another of his "Big Forty" Reeves steam engines, a US or "States" engine, pulling some sacked grain to market at Stanford, Montana.

The fourth and fifth are of some pull types we had on our place. The first is of some of our 15-30 McCormick-Deerings pulling one of two Advance-Rumely "combine harvesters." The last picture is of my dad on a 15-30 pulling their McCormick-Deering combine.

Old Binder Guy

AKA:Gary ;)

PS: Ralph, my friend you have many, many good photos of harvest. The rest of you guys do too!

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Gary...........no yelling here!! My father rented a Avery like that one summer to cut wheat. I got to run the tractor [WC Allis] and also the ships wheel raise and lower for the platform. For the younger set notice the counterbalance on the headers. We owned a Oliver No. 6, I think, that had this same arrangement to help raise the heavy cutter head. The Penfield, Ill. tractor club has a working Avery like that one and the machine is in reasonably good shape. Dad had a 15-30 only he always called it a 22-36. We had a big discussion on here once about that one!!!

Neat picture of the little 42 also.

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Whenever I see pictures of a steam engine in a wheat field all I can think about is "What a fire hazard." Wow. Guess they had enough guys around and went slow enough to keep an eye on everything. How much would one of those big ole pull types cut in a day?

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Whenever I see pictures of a steam engine in a wheat field all I can think about is "What a fire hazard." Wow. Guess they had enough guys around and went slow enough to keep an eye on everything. How much would one of those big ole pull types cut in a day?

MOChad,

If it's paranoia, I carry it too, for wheat field fires. They had quite a spark arrestor on the smokestack and Reeves had a completely tight firebox, except for the draft door. I'd think one would want to pull into plowed ground to clean out any ashes and hope none fell out through neglect in the field. That combined harvester would burn much of the day, I'd think!

Gary :rolleyes:

Gary...........no yelling here!! My father rented a Avery like that one summer to cut wheat. I got to run the tractor [WC Allis] and also the ships wheel raise and lower for the platform. For the younger set notice the counterbalance on the headers. We owned a Oliver No. 6, I think, that had this same arrangement to help raise the heavy cutter head. The Penfield, Ill. tractor club has a working Avery like that one and the machine is in reasonably good shape. Dad had a 15-30 only he always called it a 22-36. We had a big discussion on here once about that one!!!

Neat picture of the little 42 also.

chub,

I'm trying to read between the lines, as I'm not smart enough to know, but is the 42 the McCormick-Deering combine? I also know they had some 22-36 tractors, but I remember Dad calling these two 15-30s. They had one carbide headlight on them for operating after nightfall. They used Prestolite bottled gas to power the lights.

Gary

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.

The fourth and fifth are of some pull types we had on our place. The first is of some of our 15-30 McCormick-Deerings pulling one of two Advance-Rumely "combine harvesters." The last picture is of my dad on a 15-30 pulling their McCormick-Deering combine.

Old Binder Guy

PS: Ralph, my friend you have many, many good photos of harvest. The rest of you guys do too!

Hi Gary

That one shot you have of the 15-30s and combine almost looks like two tractors hooked in tandem to pull the combine. Or is it just my imagination? I like how the steel wheels on the rear tractor are shined to a mirror finish by the stubble. I'd heard stories of this but never seen it. I'd guess it took a lot of acres to do that.

Chub, my Uncle was the same, he'd call it a 22-36 because thats what it was. The newer, improved version of the 15-30 tractor.

I dug deep into my old machinery ads to find this 1951 IH combine ad showing a model 122C pull type, a model I'd never heard of before.

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""Kjohn, I couldn't have said it better myself. I never got to work the big 96 JD but did help a friend harvest with his smaller 65 JD. Behind the 4020 power shift it made a good combination and we'd even unload on the go with me running the 2010 on the 150 bushel hopper wagon. There were a lot of those green pull types around in those days. Including the big model 106 that only the really big farmers owned.

Heres a pic of what I drove back then. That 460 Case was no load for the 730 tractor and I can remember bending a crowbar trying to unplug the cylinder far too often.""

Loadstar: My old neighbor had a 600 Case, the SP version of a 400/460. It had a 40" cyl., same as our 96, but it was lacking in everything behind the cylinder. The neighbor was a big man, at least 6'6", and looked even bigger sitting on that open platform 600. I could literally have run circles around him. You are right about the 106 being a "big" combine in its day. It took some raw horsepower to keep one of those babies running at full capacity. A friend had a really nice 106 and pulled it with a Cockshutt 1950 GM. He said he could bring the Cockshutt to its knees under ideal conditions. When we got our 96, the JD blockman came out and took movies, as it was one of the very first in Saskatchewan. I can recall the dealer and the blockman trotting along side as Dad was picking up a swath of wheat. The dealer was an incredibly fussy and meticulous man, and spend quite a bit of time tinkering with this combine. The old 96 was very simple to adjust. If the straw was nice and dry, but the wheat kernel not overly dry, you could set the little "extension" chaffer, or whatever it was called, so that it stood nearly straight up, set the concave a bit lower. Any partial heads that slipped though would be caught at the back end and sent up through the return for another go. This little scheme would allow you to pack a little more through the poor combine. It worked like a charm on wheat, until the kernels became too dry, then cracking would occur. My other neighbor had a 403, and could never figure out why I could always scoop him when we worked in the same field. He would jump down, run over to check my chaff to see if I was throwing grain over. He would get up, shake his head, stare at the old JD. It was a good trick that a lot of farmers never would listen too. The Masseys with that stupid "rethresher" had an awful time with returned stuff. You couldn't dare return the amount that the old JD would handle. :P:P

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The Penfield, Ill. tractor club has a working Avery like that one and the machine is in reasonably good shape.

She has had a bit of a water leak for several years, but it is still alive and very well, Chub.

It has been out for as long as I have been around the I&I club.

The Penfield, Ill. tractor club has a working Avery like that one and the machine is in reasonably good shape.

She has had a bit of a water leak for several years, but it is still alive and very well, Chub.

It has been out for as long as I have been around the I&I club.

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Ralph,

You and chub are probably right. Those 15-30s probably are 22-36s? I remember as a kid when some of that old iron was still on the place, they called all of "those" 15-30s and all of their Farmalls were "Regulars" and I know they had one or two F-20s or F-30s? Loose terminology, I guess. I know those tractors were both pulling the challenging hills together, but I'd guess they used a chain between them and two drivers. Stubble sure shined things up. It was amazing the "comb" wear under the cutterbars of those Rumely combines, from the stubble brushing them over the years. We used them until about 1953 or 54. They were re-motored with John Deere combine Hercules power plants and they had IH 123SP (long) clean and return grain elevators. I can't find it, but hope to again someday... My wife had a picture of her dad's IH 122 pull type combine. It dropped the grain pan during harvest one year by breaking the metal. He didn't have much good to say about it and sure loved his crude old 21 Massey-Harris self propelled.

Gary ;)

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Guys, thanks for the good pictures and all the stories. This is interesting to me since there arent any PT's in use around here any more.

I showed this thread to a coworker of mine from kansas this week at work and he said he got to tour the deere harvester works in the mid 80's and the day they were there they wer building PT's along with the 7720's.

We were wondering how much difference in price there was between a PT and a SP. Looks like they could save a little money on it.

As for parts commonality like JP mentioned, I had to chuckle when I noticed the rear ladder on the 7721 is still bent foreward at the base to miss the rear tire. :D

Chub, if you read this, we was wondering if the tractor on that 7721 was a 46 or a 4850? We couldnt tell for sure.

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I 'm trying to post some old b&w pto pictures but can't get them reduced to a size that will post. One picture is my father about 1944 with a W6 on steel pulling a massey 17. The steel wheels shine like mirrors. He combined a lot of acres with that outfit as combines were scarce as was manpower to thresh during ww2.

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