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chub

JOHN DEERE PULL TYPE 7721

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post-98-1192581263_thumb.jpgGot a phone call from John Hahn last Sunday. Knew he and his brother Dan have this combine. Invited me to come see as I had expressed interest in seeing same run after seeing it this summer in their barn yard.

The combine came from North Dakota. Grain head is a modified 15 footer [12 foot was biggest they made for this machine]. They also have a JD 5 row cornhead for same. Yes, 5 row.............there are some odd configurations west of the corn belt.

John was running a 9600 and simply left Dan 10 rows after every round.

These 2 are John Deere collectors and have lots of "stuff".

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Another view

post-98-1192581743_thumb.jpgOne more

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I'd be interested in seeing a back shot that showed how those two went together. Looks like all that's missing from the combine is the driver's platform?

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Neat...a modern pull type combine! I've never seen one except in reference books and there are none around here.

Thanks for the view!

dave

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There was one of those for sale or on an auction in farmworld here within the last month or so

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Never seen a Deere pt, did they quit building them about the same time CIH did? Was there a modern day Gleaner pt to compete?

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I'd be interested in seeing a back shot that showed how those two went together. Looks like all that's missing from the combine is the driver's platform?

If you are referring to the platform the cut out hole had to be moved to the left and a auger out of a 18' head was cut off on one end so the fingers would match the throat opening. Class A job too.

Lot different up front as it is a PTO drive. That tractor just purred along with the load. It looked like a float-spring header control underneath the header but I did not ask.

Sorry, all the pictures I took.

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That's pretty neat Chub :) Glad you posted that. How cool would it be to have a 1482 pulled by a 7288 to go alongside.

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Seen a couple riged up with straight cut headers up here. One was in a picture of a machine around here and the other I actually saw on a dealers lot. It had a 20 some foot header on it. Sat there for a long time too. There is a pile of those pull types up here though. Sell cheap too. I've seen good 7721 pt combines sell for as little as 2500 bucks cdn. We had a 6601 pt for a few years but we wore it out. Was a good little combine but a real pita to work with in a ways. You were always looking back. Another thing with pull types is a small tractor isn't any good on them unless you're on flat land or gently rolling. Hillsides will pull the tractor sideways on the hill

Ryan

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Nice to see a pull type still working. They used to be very popular here in SAsk. Deere sold a lot of 7721s and before that the 6601. There was a pull type version of the maximizer, believe it was the 9501. I only saw a few of them and I don't think they were in production as long as the earlier series. That small header made them unsuitable for straight cutting here as these combines needed 20 to 30 feet of crop width to work them to capacity most of the time. These pull types were at their best picking up a good thick 25 to 30 foot swath of grain. I don't have any pictures of the latest deere pull type but here is one I like of the last of the CIH line, the 1682.

Not to forget the "other red power", here is another very popular combine, the Massey 851 from the same series as the 850/860.

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Small tractor

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Big tractor

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Any ideas which one was more productive? Both were 1682s.

Amazing how different these machines are from a 1680.

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Small tractor

Big tractor

Any ideas which one was more productive? Both were 1682s.

Amazing how different these machines are from a 1680.

Hard to say on the productivity. That quad trac looks like a bit of overkill unless your working in really hilly or muddy conditions. The 2 wheeler appears to be a 23 or 2594 Case which should handle the 1682 pretty good on that level land and probably burn less fuel than the big quad. A good power shift was half the battle in keeping up with the self propelleds and their hydro drives.

I wasn't aware there was much difference between the 1682 and 1680 , at least as far as internal threshing dimensions anyway.

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Love those big old pull types. When I was a kid we had a Case PT, K model I think with a 14' header. had it's own 4 cyl engine same as on a VAC I think. Dad wore it out and bought another one at a sale and used the old one for parts. It had a hyd system for the header lift and a control on the tounge to engage the seperator. had to stop to engage the unloading auger. It would play with our H Farmall but the DC Case was a little better and the D JD held it the best. Always wanted to run one of the newer IH pull types.

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A question comes to mind. How would the capacity of an IH 42 pull type compare to the above combines?

:D

A local part time farmer here used his AC 66 pull type combine to run some beans a couple weeks ago.

He said the lack of weeds was good but dumping the 15 bushel grain tank in 60 BPA yield became the biggest job.

One of our customers with a new 2588 ran 1200 acres of beans and has been done for a week. I told him it would take 2 fall seasons to run that many with beans with the old IH 101 SP with 10 head that I used to have.

Bill

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Interesting stuff. I didn't know that D**re built a large pull-type like that, but I'm not surprised. Thanks for the pics and the discussion. ;)

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That pull-type combine's a rare bird. I knew that the larger pull-type combines were built but I didn't think that many were south of Canada or the Red River Valley.

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A question comes to mind. How would the capacity of an IH 42 pull type compare to the above combines?

:D

A local part time farmer here used his AC 66 pull type combine to run some beans a couple weeks ago.

He said the lack of weeds was good but dumping the 15 bushel grain tank in 60 BPA yield became the biggest job.

One of our customers with a new 2588 ran 1200 acres of beans and has been done for a week. I told him it would take 2 fall seasons to run that many with beans with the old IH 101 SP with 10 head that I used to have.

Bill

Bill, I'[m not too familiar with the IH 42 pulltype but I can tell you that the 14/1682 has a voracious appetite and eats up a big swath faster than I could ever imagine back when I was running a 510 Massey. I'd always considered the 510 pretty good capacity but working in the same field with a neighbours 1482 I was amazed just how much faster he could go. The only weak spot was the feeder house that would plug when the straw got a bit tough.

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I don't see what good any of those things would be.

Problems I can envision:

1) Wouldn't the tractor get really filthy with dust?

2) The driver would have to spend A LOT of time looking to the rear?

3) How the H_LL do you open up a field without first trampling a whole lot of crop with the tractor????

4) If something were to be going wrong mechanically within the pull type combine, how would you know? You would be far removed from hearing certain noise warnings of something going wrong inside the combine, and you would have no instrumentation to watch critcal combine functions, etc.?

I don't see how those things would be very practical.

Rick G.

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In western Canada there is a lot of good for a pull type combine.

1) The tractor can see alot of dust, but you are also so much further from the rear of the combine that it usually isn't much of a problem unless you have a tail wind.

2) You doo spend alot of time looking to the rear, Tractors with swivel seats are much better for this.

3) Pull type combines were primarily used to pick up a swath so trampling is not an issue.

4) The newer machines 1482/1682 have the same instrumentation as the self propelled models that is in a control box you place in the tractor cab. You also use these controls to engage the feeder house, unloading auger, adjust fan and rotor speed, as well as monitor fan and rotor rpm and there are alarms for the various shafts.

5) The biggest advantage is cost you can purchase a good 1682 for $15,000 and use a tractor you already have. My brother used an 8920 to power his 1682 and it did quite well, dads 1680 would just slowly pull away. Tractor horsepower is the limiting factor, I believe the 1682 is rated to handle about 200 hp.

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In western Canada there is a lot of good for a pull type combine.

1) The tractor can see alot of dust, but you are also so much further from the rear of the combine that it usually isn't much of a problem unless you have a tail wind.

2) You doo spend alot of time looking to the rear, Tractors with swivel seats are much better for this.

3) Pull type combines were primarily used to pick up a swath so trampling is not an issue.

4) The newer machines 1482/1682 have the same instrumentation as the self propelled models that is in a control box you place in the tractor cab. You also use these controls to engage the feeder house, unloading auger, adjust fan and rotor speed, as well as monitor fan and rotor rpm and there are alarms for the various shafts.

5) The biggest advantage is cost you can purchase a good 1682 for $15,000 and use a tractor you already have. My brother used an 8920 to power his 1682 and it did quite well, dads 1680 would just slowly pull away. Tractor horsepower is the limiting factor, I believe the 1682 is rated to handle about 200 hp.

You have pretty much covered what I was going to reply to Rick. Initial cost savings was the biggest advantage of the pull type. Getting more use out of your big tractor. No extra engine, transmission etc. to maintain. Dust was not an issue on the older, smaller combines but in recent years on the big pull types some used to install a rotary air screen on the front of their tractors to reduce radiator plugging. My 7130 still has the holes in the grille where a previous owner had one of these installed. As cheap as they sell now some day I'd like to pick up a good 1682 to pull with the 7130, if only for flax and canola. I worked a pull type in the seventies and looking backwards was not a problem then. Not sure how my spine would handle it 30 some years later.

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My brother just traded in his 1682 at Schroeder Bros. in Chaimberlain this fall on a 2188. He used dads 8920 to power it. The difference in performance between it and the 1680 (long seive) is about the same as the difference between the 1680 and the 2188. Dad had a 1482 and later a 1682. He used a JD 8430 on the 1482 and the 1682, and then traded tractors to the versatile 846. The 846 ran the combine nicer than the 8920 power wise but the manuverability and powershift of the 8920 seemed to make up for the reduction in power. They were picking up 30 foot swaths in the North Battleford area. I got to run it for a few days a couple of years ago and you sure knew the combine was there, you were running with almost no reserve power.

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I don't see what good any of those things would be.

I don't see how those things would be very practical.

Head north to Alberta or Saskatchewan some day. Farming is so different up there that a lot of things they like and do make little to no sense to Midwesterners. Quite a few people up there are still upset both Deere (yes, it can be spelled without ***s) and CIH quit making these pulltypes back in the early 90s.

In these areas you generally have two options for harvesting your small grains, swath it or disect it. Some areas, such as southern Alberta, can have a natural kill however. With canola you are almost forced into swathing due to shatter loss if it is straight cut when ripe, so you must cut it while still green. Hence why about 99% of the pulltypes out there have pickup headers on them, swaths is the name of the game.

The picture I posted with the Quadtrac on the 1682 was a farm that was well run. They had two new 88s they traded for every year, but kept the pulltype around for an additional machine in swaths. In their words, it was easier to bump the capacity of the machine, just put a bigger tractor on the front! Yes, well in excess of the rated power it should have taken, but they'd been doing it for years with no unusual breakage or wear. They'd been running it on Magnums until they ordered a Quad with a PTO in it, that changed their thinking in a hurry. I'd bet it would be burning the same amount of fuel as a two wheeler while not being run to death at the same time. In their estimation, in their larger fields the 1682 was more productive then the 2005 2388s they had running side by side it, however when there was lots of turning the SPs had the advantage. I bet in that area of Alberta every single farm had a PT either as the main machine or as an additional one.

As for the differences between a PT and SP, yes, there are a lot of common parts, primarily in the threshing and grain tank area. However, the frame, drives, and all the "knick knacks" are totally different. Power coming in through the PTO from the lower front left corner has to be routed completely different then it coming from the rear of the engine at the upper rear left corner of the machine.

Have seen lots and lots of these in the field, majority were 14/1682s, a few 7721 Deere's, pockets with loads of Cockshutt/Coops, and the odd Massey. Still waiting to see a Versatile Trans Axial in the field, saw one on a lot once.

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still gotta pto header

used to be lots of em around

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Have seen lots and lots of these in the field, majority were 14/1682s, a few 7721 Deere's, pockets with loads of Cockshutt/Coops, and the odd Massey. Still waiting to see a Versatile Trans Axial in the field, saw one on a lot once.

The Versatile trans axial was never too common in my area. I know of one guy that is runnning one and I watched this one sell at a farm auction a year ago.

still gotta pto header

used to be lots of em around

Ozfarm ,its a little hard to tell from the picture what kind of combine that is .

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Western Canada was an absolute heaven for pull-type combines. My Dad had several, the last one being the first "roundback" 96 John Deere in our area. It was a great old combine, simple in construction, very easy to operate, easy to fix. We combined thousands of acres with it and it eventually simply wore out. I ran it with my old turbo'd 660 and made that old 282 take good notice in a nice swath of wheat. I can still recall working late at night and listening to the old auger fingers "chuck-a-chuck chuck-a-chuck" and the straw chopper hissing as it was firing the straw out the back. For those who "can't see any use" for a pull-type, you will have to ask the thousands of owners how they struggled along with them. IIRC, the 96 cost Dad about $6500 in 1962 or '63, while a 95 SP was around $10,000. We swathed everything, so a small header was not an issue. Where possible, we swathed the first round backwards, elimnating the problem of the unloading auger being a nuisance. We also picked up swaths back and forth in the later years, making it much simpler for the poor truck driver. We hauled grain way with our faithful old 1950 Mercury one ton, a hopper at a time. Guess what boys??? We made money at it too!! :P:P

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Have seen lots and lots of these in the field, majority were 14/1682s, a few 7721 Deere's, pockets with loads of Cockshutt/Coops, and the odd Massey. Still waiting to see a Versatile Trans Axial in the field, saw one on a lot once.

The Versatile trans axial was never too common in my area. I know of one guy that is runnning one and I watched this one sell at a farm auction a year ago.

still gotta pto header

used to be lots of em around

Ozfarm ,its a little hard to tell from the picture what kind of combine that is .

its notta combine, its a header

will have to look for a better picture, buts its a oz built massey

s,mite be a better 1

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