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1967806

O-ring lube for liners

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I forgot all about this thread. Keep us posted on what you find Lyle.

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I went and got a bottle of the John Deere soap solution, 1 quart for $18. That amount should last me a while! I'll have to see what the o rings look like when I get it apart, hopefully next week.

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Sounds pricey. I didnt remember what it cost. I used the bottle that I bought once and put it on the shelf. I got knocked off on the floor and the bottle broke open and spilled half of it so I ended up tossing the rest. I figured the next time I needed it, the stuff might be bad.

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Hello all worked in a AC dealership 20 plus years I was taught to use pure vegatable oil on o-rings,by a guy there when I started,he had been at it a long time took his experience for granted and used veg oil on every engine that had sleeves with o-rigs since,done several differant brands though that shop too,and I guess with a lot of luck over the years never had a o-ring problem using it. Info FWIW one experience with a D-17 engine the o-rings in a engine kit from AGCO they are too thick and the sleeves won't go in without A lot of force,instead I called Hy-capacity and ordered o-rigs for there sleeves in their kits and worked like a charm with excellant results.

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I use the silicone lube for assembling O-rings for Eaton transmissions. Part number 71203. I coat the O-rings before I install them on the sleeves and smear a little in the block bore.

I use it on all O-rings except the one that is on the hydraulic filter cover on the 66/86 series tractors. It is too slippery for that O-ring application. The O-ring will pop out of the groove before you can get the cover installed.

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My take on using petroleum base lubes on liner installation... the different colors on the Cat liner seals denote different materials, that is why they have three rings of lower seals. The top will not tolerate any sort of oil but loves coolant and heat, the middle is a buffer ring that can take either but really doesn't like the temperature there, and the lower ring takes oil and heat but won't tolerate long contact with glychol. The upper band is more or less a retainer, it doesn't really seal anything, it expands once oil is introduced to it, the ring creates a "press fit" in the cylinder deck to help prevent head gasket fire ring wear and deterioration.

The bargain overhaul kits generally use a nitrile rubber based oring that can take both oil and coolant, so it wouldn't matter what lube you use, the only problem is nitrile doesn't like heat and that's why people see many failures there. The other materials, such as silicon, flourocarbon, ethylene, urathane, ect, all have properties that suit them for the conditions they're exposed to, they come with rather unsuitable price tags in some cases.

The Cat "One Safe Source" book http://www.cat.com/cda/files/1426199/7/PECP9067-03.pdf has a nice chart (page 17-33) in it to explain all the differences and help you decide what you want to use on your rebuild.

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Good old white Crisco in the can. My Dad used it for every IH engine with o-rings around the sleeves when he worked for IH and I use it too. I keep a can of Crisco on the side table of my toolbox.

Travis

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I also use Crisco on every overhaul.

Glenn

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