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1967806

O-ring lube for liners

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I was kind of thinking foreward here and trying to decide what to use for the liner O-rings when I put my engine back together. Here at work if the cylinder body is good we just use an O-ring grease made by dow corning. If they are pitted we use RTV silcione and have good results. I would never do that on a tractor engine but these big old compressor engines are pretty forgiving sometimes. I overhauled a little john deere gasser one time and used soap to lube the orings. The guy's ruined the engine not long after we sent it home and when it came back I tore it apart and you could see every finger print on the liner I made where I had soap on my fingers. It made it rust there so I never used that again. i was thinking at one time John Deere made a special liner o-ring lube. I havent quite decided what to use on my 1466 yet. Its been nearly 13 years since Ive been in on an overhaul of a tractor and quite honestly forgot what we always used before. What does everyone else have good luck with?

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We used dish soap

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I also use mild dish soap...a rich mixture in warm water. Sometimes the manufacturer will supply a silicone O-ring which will be a different color, and if they do they usually specify whether to use mild soap or engine oil as lube.

FD B)

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At work we are trained on the different engines, Detroit wants vasoline, Cummins veggie oil, Cat has an o-ring lubricant that is basiclly just mild soap on three of the o-rings and on the filler band they want oil. But in most cases on my own I will use mild soap, just something to lube o-rings were they will not swell and roll. On most other o-rings I use lubriplate 105 engine lube.

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Deere has O' ring soap in a quart bottle, Tire soap works equally as well.

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been 25 years since the 240

but we used murphy oil paste soap/salve

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IH service manual says on a 400 series engine use soapy water, do not use petroleum jelly. i just read it on 3-29-2007. littlefoot

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I was kind of thinking foreward here and trying to decide what to use for the liner O-rings when I put my engine back together. Here at work if the cylinder body is good we just use an O-ring grease made by dow corning. If they are pitted we use RTV silcione and have good results. I would never do that on a tractor engine but these big old compressor engines are pretty forgiving sometimes. I overhauled a little john deere gasser one time and used soap to lube the orings. The guy's ruined the engine not long after we sent it home and when it came back I tore it apart and you could see every finger print on the liner I made where I had soap on my fingers. It made it rust there so I never used that again. i was thinking at one time John Deere made a special liner o-ring lube. I havent quite decided what to use on my 1466 yet. Its been nearly 13 years since Ive been in on an overhaul of a tractor and quite honestly forgot what we always used before. What does everyone else have good luck with?

400 series service manual says to use clean 30# engine oil.

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I just finished overhauling a 239 German Diesel in a 2544 hydro. The overhaul kit from Howard Enterprises said to use straight dishwashing soap, not diluted in water. The instruction sheet said warranty will not cover lubrication with anything besides the soap or a special oring lube. The IH engine book says to use engine oil, which I've been doing for years. I called them to inform them of that and was told to use the soap.

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I used dish soap last summer on my 4010 and promptly found rust problems also, I am sold on deere liner oring lube now. One bottle should last for atleast ten engines. Jon

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I don't like the Idea of soap to many kinds some are harsh on things I would use anti-freeze before soap

which by the way has lube in it to. I would say oil petro jelly or My personal fav motor assembly gresse it's

white in color I get it a Napa.

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I've used vaseline, ever since I was in the Airforce and I figured good enough for jet engines. Also as a side bar Milk of Magnesia is the best anti-seeze for exaust parts also from jet engines.

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I've had the best luck with vegetable oil

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I'm putting new sleeves and pistons in a Super C. They are Richland parts, and in the instructions they suggest engine oil, a soap solution or brake fluid. Never heard brake fluid suggested before! :blink::mellow:

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I ended up using John Deere liner packing lube. It is soap based. The instructons in the kit said NOT to use any kind of petroleum based lube.

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It has always baffled me why they can prelube a condom ,but they can't prelube an O ring ^_^

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It has always baffled me why they can prelube a condom ,but they can't prelube an O ring ^_^

Well NB when you're huntin' around for a rubber you're usually in a hurry and don't have time to look around for any lube to go with it :lol: . Besides when I think of rebuilding engines I don't picture anybody doing that in the heat of the moment so you've got the time, and hands :o , to apply the needed lubrication.

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I'm putting new sleeves and pistons in a Super C. They are Richland parts, and in the instructions they suggest engine oil, a soap solution or brake fluid. Never heard brake fluid suggested before! :blink::mellow:

I would think that using brake fluid would be a big NO-NO, as it swells the rubber. I have never heard of using it at all. I always used the JD liner soap.

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I dug this topic up again because I have a 1066 in my shop now that I overhauled 2 years ago and it has anti freeze leaking into the oil around one of the sleeves. It only has 230 hours on the overhaul, and it is the ONLY tractor that I have ever used dishwashing soap on the orings. Always have used oil on everything with wet sleeves for the last 31 years. I haven't had time to get the head off and sleeve out to see the problem, but the rep from Howard Enterprises stopped by last week and wants to see it when I get it taken apart. I talked to another mechanic who said he uses tire mounting lubricant. Any more choices out there?

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I was kind of thinking foreward here and trying to decide what to use for the liner O-rings when I put my engine back together. Here at work if the cylinder body is good we just use an O-ring grease made by dow corning. If they are pitted we use RTV silcione and have good results. I would never do that on a tractor engine but these big old compressor engines are pretty forgiving sometimes. I overhauled a little john deere gasser one time and used soap to lube the orings. The guy's ruined the engine not long after we sent it home and when it came back I tore it apart and you could see every finger print on the liner I made where I had soap on my fingers. It made it rust there so I never used that again. i was thinking at one time John Deere made a special liner o-ring lube. I havent quite decided what to use on my 1466 yet. Its been nearly 13 years since Ive been in on an overhaul of a tractor and quite honestly forgot what we always used before. What does everyone else have good luck with?

I HAVE USED THE JOHN DEERE LUB ON A LOT OF SLEEVES ASSEMBLIES WITH VERY GOOD RESULTS

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It has always baffled me why they can prelube a condom ,but they can't prelube an O ring happy.gif

I HEARD OF A SANDWICH BAGGY AND VEGGIE OIL BEING USED IN THE HEAT OF THE MOMENT...ohmy.gifbiggrin.gif

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It has always baffled me why they can prelube a condom ,but they can't prelube an O ring ^_^

Maybe we should use KY Jelly!!!!:blink::blush::lol:

Seriously though, aren't the orings subjected to engine oil and antifreeze when in service???? Why would either hurt them on assembly? I don't know the answer, I'm just wondering?

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Original 400 series service manual said, petroleum jelly (vaseline). Then they changed saying use engine oil. Now they say soap. I have used all three, what ever they recommend at the time. One thing about the John Deere soap solution is it dries very fast and gets gummy so you need to drop her right in. The 0-rings that go in the block are always the most problematic for me to make sure they are not twisted. On the type on the sleeve be sure to run a dull tool around underneath them like an o-ring tool to get any twists out as that is the most common problem with premature o-ring failure, before cavitation erosion sets in.

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