Archived

This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies.

ed langley

A question for you 1066 tractor pullers

19 posts in this topic

Hi, all

A friend of mine is thinking of buying a 1066 for tractor pulling over here in the uk.

Can anyone tell me what the technical specifications of the standard farm tractor are and what the specs are for a average 1066 pulling tractor.

What are the usual modifications done.

Cheers Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Engine specs are

414 ci 4.3"bore 4.75" stroke, Wet sleeve, oil cooles pistons, crank driven oil pump, cross flow head. Rated at 125PTO HP.

The transmission is a 4 speed sliding gear with a high and low plus a two speed hydraulic direct and under. Has a total of 16 forward speeds with the "torque amplifier "

Shipping weight of the tractor is about 13,000#

The modifications depend opn the class and the rules you pull under. If you pull in a "stock farm" class just opening the fuel pump should get you into the 250hp range. From there the sky is the limit as far as modifications. A easy hp gain is to change the crank and pistons to go to 466CI. The stock model 100 Bosch pump and injectors can be modified for significant HP gains to the 450 to 650 hp range with turgbocharger mods and changes.(approx). From there a inline fuel pump will deliver MUCH more fuel and more reliably than the rotory stock pump. With a inline pump and proper porting,cam changes, and a BIG charger 1000HP and MUCH more can be had. These tractors seem to be able to handle quite a bit of HP in the normal weight classes. There are several companys here in USA that specialize in IH pulling parts. Or you could buy mine!??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Engine specs are

414 ci 4.3"bore 4.75" stroke, Wet sleeve, oil cooles pistons, crank driven oil pump, cross flow head. Rated at 125PTO HP.

The transmission is a 4 speed sliding gear with a high and low plus a two speed hydraulic direct and under. Has a total of 16 forward speeds with the "torque amplifier "

Shipping weight of the tractor is about 13,000#

The modifications depend opn the class and the rules you pull under. If you pull in a "stock farm" class just opening the fuel pump should get you into the 250hp range. From there the sky is the limit as far as modifications. A easy hp gain is to change the crank and pistons to go to 466CI. The stock model 100 Bosch pump and injectors can be modified for significant HP gains to the 450 to 650 hp range with turgbocharger mods and changes.(approx). From there a inline fuel pump will deliver MUCH more fuel and more reliably than the rotory stock pump. With a inline pump and proper porting,cam changes, and a BIG charger 1000HP and MUCH more can be had. These tractors seem to be able to handle quite a bit of HP in the normal weight classes. There are several companys here in USA that specialize in IH pulling parts. Or you could buy mine!??

Hi,

At 650-1000hp,man thats impressive, what stops them from blowing up?!!!!!!!!!

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

[

At 650-1000hp,man thats impressive, what stops them from blowing up?!!!!!!!!!

Ed

Well I would say it not a farm tractor anymore dont put alot of hours on it.

Good luck on you tractor pulling.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
At 650-1000hp,man thats impressive, what stops them from blowing up?!!!!!!!!!

Ed

They only run that hard for a few seconds at a time and there is alot of money put into them to help hold them together.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only Green ones i seen fly apart like that have been the Die Hard Deeres/Greenline Express They all were K&K built tractors Be interesting to see if they got their issues figured out

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If I thinking right the motor blow apart right about where the camshaft runs throw the block heard that is the weak spot of the 400 # motor. when running that much power.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the cool pictures guys, I thought holding 1000hp together might be harder than you made it out to be! Here`s another question -Diesel engined pulling tractors put out **** of alot of smoke, how much of that is unburnt fuel and secondly has anyone ever used nitrous injection to get a better fuel/oxygen mix?

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only Green ones i seen fly apart like that have been the Die Hard Deeres/Greenline Express They all were K&K built tractors Be interesting to see if they got their issues figured out

Renegade Deer layed an egg last year after just a few hooks.

Thanks for the cool pictures guys, I thought holding 1000hp together might be harder than you made it out to be! Here`s another question -Diesel engined pulling tractors put out **** of alot of smoke, how much of that is unburnt fuel and secondly has anyone ever used nitrous injection to get a better fuel/oxygen mix?

Ed

Any smoke means it's unburnt. Nitrous is illegal in all pulling organizations I can think of, but I hear it'll make em' run like a scalded dog.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yep, nitrous oxide is illegal by all pulling leagues & chapters. Just about any oxygen boosting gas is considered illegal in pulling. The only thing that is permitted is injecting water, and that's just to keep it cool.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
The only Green ones i seen fly apart like that have been the Die Hard Deeres/Greenline Express They all were K&K built tractors Be interesting to see if they got their issues figured out

From what I hear,most of the JD's that are coming apart are using the new 8.1? block.The older 466 or 619 blocks stay together better.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only Green ones i seen fly apart like that have been the Die Hard Deeres/Greenline Express They all were K&K built tractors Be interesting to see if they got their issues figured out

From what I hear,most of the JD's that are coming apart are using the new 8.1? block.The older 466 or 619 blocks stay together better.

Right Blaine. Also you can't really compare superstocks to prostocks as the supers run closer to 300 psi boost pressure and pro's run around a hundred :wacko:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The only Green ones i seen fly apart like that have been the Die Hard Deeres/Greenline Express They all were K&K built tractors Be interesting to see if they got their issues figured out

From what I hear,most of the JD's that are coming apart are using the new 8.1? block.The older 466 or 619 blocks stay together better.

Right Blaine. Also you can't really compare superstocks to prostocks as the supers run closer to 300 psi boost pressure and pro's run around a hundred :wacko:

You may not can compare them on boost, it's the cubes that have a lot to do with it. Supers range from 436- 540 cubes where pros can get up to 680.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You need the Lemke boys to build you a puller, they are the best....

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Thanks for the cool pictures guys, I thought holding 1000hp together might be harder than you made it out to be! Here`s another question -Diesel engined pulling tractors put out **** of alot of smoke, how much of that is unburnt fuel and secondly has anyone ever used nitrous injection to get a better fuel/oxygen mix?

Ed

The excess black smoke is unburned or partally burned fuel. This does serve a real purpose. The excess fuel helps cool the combustion chamber and thus helps avoid melted pistons. There is a very fine line between melted pistons and maximum horse power. Many of the top NTPA pullers use a on board computer that recordes the individual exhaust temps, boost pressure,engine rpm's, clutch slippage and wheel speed. With this extensive information you can dial in your fuel injection pump to allow maximum exhaust temps and horsepower without burning pistons. The legal way to add air is to install a more efficent turbocharger or turbochargers. Water injection actually is a great way to get more air into the cylinders. The water is sprayed into the charge air at high pressure and at the phase change (liquid to steam) there is a huge drop in intake air trmperature. Cooler air is denser than hor air and thus holds more oxygen. If you are interested in a very good book on turbochargers pick up "Turbochargers" by Hugh Machinnes. There is a lot of infromation in it that explaines how these simple lmachines work and how they can be quite complex to set up with a engine properly.

There have been quite a few diesel pullers that have been banned from competing by using oxygenates=alcohol,nitros, mixes of notromethane etc.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for the cool pictures guys, I thought holding 1000hp together might be harder than you made it out to be! Here`s another question -Diesel engined pulling tractors put out **** of alot of smoke, how much of that is unburnt fuel and secondly has anyone ever used nitrous injection to get a better fuel/oxygen mix?

Ed

The excess black smoke is unburned or partally burned fuel. This does serve a real purpose. The excess fuel helps cool the combustion chamber and thus helps avoid melted pistons. There is a very fine line between melted pistons and maximum horse power. Many of the top NTPA pullers use a on board computer that recordes the individual exhaust temps, boost pressure,engine rpm's, clutch slippage and wheel speed. With this extensive information you can dial in your fuel injection pump to allow maximum exhaust temps and horsepower without burning pistons. The legal way to add air is to install a more efficent turbocharger or turbochargers. Water injection actually is a great way to get more air into the cylinders. The water is sprayed into the charge air at high pressure and at the phase change (liquid to steam) there is a huge drop in intake air trmperature. Cooler air is denser than hor air and thus holds more oxygen. If you are interested in a very good book on turbochargers pick up "Turbochargers" by Hugh Machinnes. There is a lot of infromation in it that explaines how these simple lmachines work and how they can be quite complex to set up with a engine properly.

There have been quite a few diesel pullers that have been banned from competing by using oxygenates=alcohol,nitros, mixes of notromethane etc.

Hi,

interesting stuff,it`s agood job that there are different classes as I can see alot of the more complex machines are beyond the finances and capabilities of the average guy with his fueled up or blown farm tractor.

Over here in the UK tractor pulling has gone a bit quiet in the last 10 years, due to lack of spare cash in uk farming,some local guys have just built a sledge so at least we should see some action around here, even if its only amateur.I`am certainly up for it!

Ed

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That's too bad about there not being any pulling going on there across the pond. I enjoy going especially to the county fairs around here and getting to see guys "run what they brung".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites