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PALOUSE

Not On The Level...100 Years Of Farming The Palouse

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Palouse,

Your photos never cease to amaze me. It appears you collect photos of combines in trouble on the Palouse hills like I've collected photos of steam engines in trouble; stuck, through bridges, blown up and any other precarious place they could be. As a semi flatlander, it'd make one wonder why those hills were farmed and if someone walked away from their hillside farm, someone else would be there to continue on. That's a farmer? Keep up the good work, Greg!

Gary ;)

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I've mentioned that the newer combines don't upset easily and that such accidents aren't common anymore. But there will always be exceptions to the rule and dumping one down a canyon may amount to such an exception. This accident occured two seasons back and involved an IH 1470, one of the more successful leveling combines I've known. The camera doesn't do justice to the severity of this terrain, I took the shot from the bottom of the canyon where there is a road. There is cropland at the top that is fairly level, except in a few places where it hangs over the edge of the canyon in little swales. I know this piece of land and the little bit of wheat ground showing up at the top is a hairy area. Evidently the operator got too close to the edge for some reason, his back wheels slipped over the fencerow/bank, dragging the rest of the machine over it backwards. The header broke loose near the top and I heard the combine went over backwards one complete time and landed on it's wheels and skidded to rest in the only little ravine in the area. Except for that little irregularity in the canyon side it would gone all the way down to where I took the picture. The machine is pointed to the left and the view is from the top. Through binoculars you could see the operator's seat relatively undamaged. Miraculously the driver only suffered minor injuries, and was left off partway up the canyonside when the cab disintegrated. After that the bulk tank seemed to support the rolling machine. I believe the little white specks showing on the canyonside are pieces of the white cab roof. I never got up close to it but my cousin did and he said he's never seen a combine so completely broken up. The only tire visible is the left rear one.

For sake of reference all I have on hand is this pic of a 1470 from a sales brochure. post-6771-1168055089_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1168055138_thumb.jpg

Nice thread......another photo for reference...this time a 1670.

Not all of the steep ground is in the Palouse.....

I've mentioned that the newer combines don't upset easily and that such accidents aren't common anymore. But there will always be exceptions to the rule and dumping one down a canyon may amount to such an exception. This accident occured two seasons back and involved an IH 1470, one of the more successful leveling combines I've known. The camera doesn't do justice to the severity of this terrain, I took the shot from the bottom of the canyon where there is a road. There is cropland at the top that is fairly level, except in a few places where it hangs over the edge of the canyon in little swales. I know this piece of land and the little bit of wheat ground showing up at the top is a hairy area. Evidently the operator got too close to the edge for some reason, his back wheels slipped over the fencerow/bank, dragging the rest of the machine over it backwards. The header broke loose near the top and I heard the combine went over backwards one complete time and landed on it's wheels and skidded to rest in the only little ravine in the area. Except for that little irregularity in the canyon side it would gone all the way down to where I took the picture. The machine is pointed to the left and the view is from the top. Through binoculars you could see the operator's seat relatively undamaged. Miraculously the driver only suffered minor injuries, and was left off partway up the canyonside when the cab disintegrated. After that the bulk tank seemed to support the rolling machine. I believe the little white specks showing on the canyonside are pieces of the white cab roof. I never got up close to it but my cousin did and he said he's never seen a combine so completely broken up. The only tire visible is the left rear one.

For sake of reference all I have on hand is this pic of a 1470 from a sales brochure. post-6771-1168055089_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1168055138_thumb.jpg

Nice thread......another photo for reference...this time a 1670.

Not all of the steep ground is in the Palouse.....

post-2011-1168091582_thumb.jpg

post-2011-1168091843_thumb.jpg

post-2011-1168092155_thumb.jpg

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98j, I was wondering when you were goin to show up.

Palouse, I see that the 35 held on just fine.

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98j...Thanks very much for some excellent pics. You had what I didn't. I am aware there are other hillside farming regions than the Palouse and made reference to that in a Dec. 27 post. Haven't been to your area in years but see pictures from there and know that hillside equipment is shipped to that area. The Walla-Walla/Milton Freewater area has some serious farming terrain that I am familiar with. My son-in-law worked in that area as an IH combine mechanic some years back. Also the Camas Prairie in Idaho has a mix of level and steep. I've seen hill farming pictures from parts of California, but not sure where at. All I know is there seems to be a lot of interest from other areas about all this and I had a bunch of photos from over the years that were going to waste. Not trying to outdo anybody. I know a few guys whose dog pretty much takes up residence in their tractor and combine cabs in season. Is that yours?

Dr. Ernie...Yes the TD-35 hung in just fine in that picture. Actually the IH 51 combine would have too except for operator error. There is a switch on the tractor that controls the automatic leveler on the combine. Because they were cutting that particular slope with the header hanging downhill, which isn't preferable, he intended to shut the leveler off at a certain point to keep the combine bottom from dragging. But he accidently put it onto reverse level and didn't notice until it was too late. Those old pull machines were getting pretty obsolete by that time and finding extra used parts was no problem. The main damage done was to the header spout, we found another good header on a lot almost immediately and the machine was running again in about a day and a half. Probably sooner but we had to wait for the R.A. Hansen repairman to come by and recalibrate the mercury switch in the leveling unit which had become all messed up in the upset. Turned out the whole thing was covered by insurance.

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This accident occured two seasons back and involved an IH 1470, one of the more successful leveling combines I've known. The camera doesn't do justice to the severity of this terrain, I took the shot from the bottom of the canyon where there is a road. There is cropland at the top that is fairly level, except in a few places where it hangs over the edge of the canyon in little swales. I know this piece of land and the little bit of wheat ground showing up at the top is a hairy area. Evidently the operator got too close to the edge for some reason, his back wheels slipped over the fencerow/bank, dragging the rest of the machine over it backwards. The header broke loose near the top and I heard the combine went over backwards one complete time and landed on it's wheels and skidded to rest in the only little ravine in the area. Except for that little irregularity in the canyon side it would gone all the way down to where I took the picture. The machine is pointed to the left and the view is from the top. Through binoculars you could see the operator's seat relatively undamaged. Miraculously the driver only suffered minor injuries, and was left off partway up the canyonside when the cab disintegrated. After that the bulk tank seemed to support the rolling machine. I believe the little white specks showing on the canyonside are pieces of the white cab roof. I never got up close to it but my cousin did and he said he's never seen a combine so completely broken up. The only tire visible is the left rear one.

Palouse, amazing photo. I have seen one similar on the net a few years ago when it was making the rounds. I'm wondering what the white and red object is at the upper left part of the photo. Almost looks like the white tarp on a red truck box but can't imagine anyone trying to drive down that hill even with an empty grain truck. :blink:

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This accident occured two seasons back and involved an IH 1470, one of the more successful leveling combines I've known. The camera doesn't do justice to the severity of this terrain, I took the shot from the bottom of the canyon where there is a road. There is cropland at the top that is fairly level, except in a few places where it hangs over the edge of the canyon in little swales. I know this piece of land and the little bit of wheat ground showing up at the top is a hairy area. Evidently the operator got too close to the edge for some reason, his back wheels slipped over the fencerow/bank, dragging the rest of the machine over it backwards. The header broke loose near the top and I heard the combine went over backwards one complete time and landed on it's wheels and skidded to rest in the only little ravine in the area. Except for that little irregularity in the canyon side it would gone all the way down to where I took the picture. The machine is pointed to the left and the view is from the top. Through binoculars you could see the operator's seat relatively undamaged. Miraculously the driver only suffered minor injuries, and was left off partway up the canyonside when the cab disintegrated. After that the bulk tank seemed to support the rolling machine. I believe the little white specks showing on the canyonside are pieces of the white cab roof. I never got up close to it but my cousin did and he said he's never seen a combine so completely broken up. The only tire visible is the left rear one.

Palouse, amazing photo. I have seen one similar on the net a few years ago when it was making the rounds. I'm wondering what the white and red object is at the upper left part of the photo. Almost looks like the white tarp on a red truck box but can't imagine anyone trying to drive down that hill even with an empty grain truck. :blink:

Loadstar...I think what you are referring to is the header of the combine, setting facing away up where it broke off as he skidded over the fencerow. It was relatively undamaged and must have had a light colored reel on it.

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Ok Palouse.....I wanna see some pictures of an IH 51 or 160 pull type.....something

on a steep hill would be nice. So, let's get cracking through your picture file.

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Palouse & 98j,

These are fantastic photos of farming in adverse (to us flatlanders) hilly conditions. I always await what Palouse will come up with next. That slide and photo library has to have the best yet to come?

I wondered what happened to the old pull type combine, whether there was an error in judgement somewhere? I can sit in my living room chair and have a stunning view of the RockY Mountains, especially yesterday morning with new snow on the top half of the trees. We don't try to farm them, but I guess we've been accused of logging some of them?

I once tipped a Dohn Deere 755 bucket crawler, with a tree clipper head on, over backwards on a very steep mountainside. I was climbing as steep as it would climb and had to cut off a forked tree, about four feet high, instead of at the ground. Weight and gravity took over and I couldn't get it tipped forward and released in time. With a D-7 and a couple of hours, I was clipping again. I had sense enough to shut it off immediately. I did have to wait until the oil drained back into the oilpan, from the head end. Waiting for that gave me time to eat my lunch. No camera that day. :( I could sure smell and feel battery acid, when going again.

98j, did the dog know how precarious he could have been, or was he just that loyal?

Keep 'em coming.

Gary ;)

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Here ya go Old Binder Guy.....harvesting with a little Mt backdrop. Handed my camera to one of

our ace truck drivers....then I headed off across this slope with dog Kirby as co-pilot. This slope uses

all of the leveler on the 1670, which means that it maxed out at 48%. That's Mt hood in the background,

the scene of the recent climbing tragedy.

post-2011-1168219711_thumb.jpg

post-2011-1168219778_thumb.jpg

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Those old pull machines were getting pretty obsolete by that time and finding extra used parts was no problem.

Palouse,

I rode many a mile as a little boy in the grain tank of our old Rumely combines. I'd play with grass hoppers, chew winter wheat into gum and whatever else was available as entertainment in there. I only remember being pulled by a M-D or TD-9. In later years, they used Dad's WD-9, after they'd put rubber tires and a John Deere (Hercules) power plant on the old Rumelys, trying to extend their lives. When the clean grain and return elevators wore out, they ordered new ones for a high tank IH 125 SP. Pretty soon, they were too worn out to keep fixing and wider headers on newer combines changed things forever. I remember a bar/plate that was below the guards on the headers of those two old pull type combines was so notched from straw rubbing them, you could almost comb your hair with them.

Keep coming with the pictures, Greg!

Gary ;)

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As for the dog.....there is NO WAY you are going to keep him out of the cab......does make it a little

akward on the downhill turns as I have to keep him from steping on the 4 wheel drive switch....step on that

baby in a 1470/1670 and you go into free fall. And it gets a tad loud inside when he spots a deere or coyote.

He loves the ladder on the 70 series......the newer combines have ladders that are way too steep for him to

get up.

post-2011-1168220679_thumb.jpg

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I've really enjoyed all the pictures both old and modern on these two threads immensely, now I'm going to ask a stupid question, do all the hill-side combines use diamond tread tires? Do they hold better on the slick straw stubble than regular cleated tires? Keep the pics coming on both threads, I've really learned a lot from reading them! :)

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These have been the best 2 threads we've had in quite some time. 98j's pics add to the great stories and pics OBG, Palouse and the rest have given us. Thanks guys. Tom

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These have been the best 2 threads we've had in quite some time. 98j's pics add to the great stories and pics OBG, Palouse and the rest have given us. Thanks guys. Tom

Cotton Farmer,

Thanks you for my little part. I like to bounce things off of others and it makes it easier for both to respond to. I'm sure there are those who wish we'd go away, but just like the TV dial (now the clicker!), there are other channels out there, if they don't like ours! I'm just a history buff that grew up on a farm and bleeds IH red paint. The farm was in another lifetime, but I still bleed red!

Gary ;)

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post-6771-1168231235_thumb.jpg post-6771-1168231270_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1168231372_thumb.jpg These are the best views I have of an IH 51 combine, pre-war galvanized model. TD-40 pulling it, '51 L-160 pulling it down the lane.

That isn't that steep a hill (and a poor crop of spring barley) but it's the best broadside I could find. The 51 we tipped over was a later red model. I recall that a 51 would level into a hill a least 50%, maybe a little bit more. But only to the right. To the left it was less than half that, but we seldom used it in that direction. You always wanted your header uphill to feed better.

You could take a 51 on about any hillside a larger crawler would pull it. The tractor's weight and traction gave the combine a lot of stability. But they were known to bounce sideways downhill on occasion, not a long way but enough to give the header puncher a thrill. They had the weight of the header on the uphill side pushing down that helped promote that. Unlike Case and some others, the only wheel that leveled was the left side one. The right side wheel was simply fastened to the side of the machine. So when it was jacked way downhill, the whole machine was sticking pretty high in the air. The leveler was mechanical rack and pinion, very slow so when turning around you had to do some planning. The wheel tread width (at level) was only about 8 feet, so when leveled up high on left side it looked pretty precarious. But forward travel was slow, maybe 3-4 MPH??

For uphill/downhill travel the 51 had a self leveling shaker shoe. Some farmers put in leveling strawwalkers too, giving the machine a new rooster tail look. Later, when the 160's came out they had all that as standard . Never owned one of those but we ran a demo one for several weeks one year. They didn't make them very long because the first leveling self propelleds were coming out.

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I always feel like I'm interupting, but I can't resist. Although they aren't making pull types any more, we are still using them, have been for years. Some pics (not so old though).

post-6916-1168233301_thumb.jpgpost-6916-1168233340_thumb.jpgpost-6916-1168233374_thumb.jpgpost-6916-1168233409_thumb.jpg

We ran just the 914 in the 80's, went to trade it in for the 1682 but they wouldn't give us much for it so we kept it. That's a 986, 3688, 7220 & 5250, and MX200 pulling. I sometime drag the 914 with the 806, just to seat the rings, and not get too spoiled. ;)

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OBG...You mentioned riding on an Rumley combine. This is the only pic I have of one of them belonging to a neighbor who insisted on running it long after it's prime. Know nothing about it except that it's one of the smaller ones. Harvesting peas, pulled by a TD-6 (to keep things red).post-6771-1168235397_thumb.jpg

After being off the past two weeks during the holidays, I have been called back into work this week, exact schedule yet unknown. That's going to cut seriously into my computer time, so my postings may become spaced out and sporadic. But will keep working at it as long as there seems to be interest.

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I've really enjoyed all the pictures both old and modern on these two threads immensely, now I'm going to ask a stupid question, do all the hill-side combines use diamond tread tires? Do they hold better on the slick straw stubble than regular cleated tires? Keep the pics coming on both threads, I've really learned a lot from reading them! :)

Will try to answer your question as best I can from my understanding of the development of combine tires.. Yes, it seems that the large diameter, daimond tread tire is the preference for hillside machine, at least for those that utilize a cambered wheel method of leveler. That is where the wheels stay parallel to the sides of the machine (vertical to the horizon) rather than to each other. If the wheels remain on a single fixed axle which simply tilts under the combine, then standard cleated tires can be used and usually are. But if they camber left and right as the machine levels, then they need a more rounded tread to accomodate that action and still keep a fair amount of tread against the ground. Nowadays, combine tires are pretty high tech, steel belted radials that can withstand all of the sidewall flexing under load that is put upon them. If you watch the tires from the uphill side as the combine moves along their sidewalls wrinkle and flex. For traction and flotation they are run at relatively low pressures. 98j likely knows the specs on that.

It wasn't always this way. That little IH 125 that my dad converted to leveling had WWI bomber tires on it, as did most early conversions. Straight off the airplane I think, smooth tread and all. Those were 20 ply high pressure tires that wouldn't tolerate any flexing. Later on tire retreaders took these same tires and apllied a diamond tread recap to them and the 141's and early 151's used those. They were big, round treaded and available at the time. The present generation of combine tires grew from there.

A friend of mine raises a lot of Kentucky Bluegrass for seed. Because it is a good soil conservation method he often plants that on his steepest ground. It is swathed first, to head off shattering out of the seed while it ripens. Harvested in July, the established turf is usually sun baked and dry by the time the combine gets over it. That hard surface can be like a well waxed dance floor because those diamond treads just can't get a grip. Slid off a few of those with his JD 6602's, they just sort of squirmed their way to the bottom and then you start up again. So, one season he bought some good used cleated tractor type treaded tires and mounted them on two combines. He figure that even at higher pressures the corners of those tires would dig into that turf and hold on. Well, it worked to some extent, but in the end the ride was so rough that it was breaking up his combines. So, eventually he took them back off. Win a few, lose a few.

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Palouse,

You keep right on posting your pictures and captions to them when ever you have time. I for one don't think I could ever tire of it.

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Not on a hill.....but a good view of a 51 in action.....run from the Cat with a RA Hanson

control box for the leveler. Cutting on Pleasant Ridge SE of The Dalles, Oregon back

in 1970.

post-2011-1168262807_thumb.jpg

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I always feel like I'm interupting, but I can't resist. Although they aren't making pull types any more, we are still using them, have been for years. Some pics (not so old though).

post-6916-1168233301_thumb.jpgpost-6916-1168233340_thumb.jpgpost-6916-1168233374_thumb.jpgpost-6916-1168233409_thumb.jpg

We ran just the 914 in the 80's, went to trade it in for the 1682 but they wouldn't give us much for it so we kept it. That's a 986, 3688, 7220 & 5250, and MX200 pulling. I sometime drag the 914 with the 806, just to seat the rings, and not get too spoiled. ;)

Wow, those pictures and everything in them looks just a whole lot of all right! The barns are real impressive...at least to me. I can imagine it is real practical to use those big pull type combines if you have big halfway level fields and just combining small grains. That is some pretty country up there....I'm gonna put the Canadian Great Plains on my "Places I'd Like To See" list.

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I've really enjoyed all the pictures both old and modern on these two threads immensely, now I'm going to ask a stupid question, do all the hill-side combines use diamond tread tires? Do they hold better on the slick straw stubble than regular cleated tires? Keep the pics coming on both threads, I've really learned a lot from reading them! :)

It wasn't always this way. That little IH 125 that my dad converted to leveling had WWI bomber tires on it, as did most early conversions. Straight off the airplane I think, smooth tread and all. Those were 20 ply high pressure tires that wouldn't tolerate any flexing. Later on tire retreaders took these same tires and apllied a diamond tread recap to them and the 141's and early 151's used those. They were big, round treaded and available at the time. The present generation of combine tires grew from there.

Gee, Palouse,

I'd almost forgotten about the use of WWII bomber tires on combines. For a time, it seemed every combine in our neighborhood had those bomber tires on their driver wheels. Then again, traction wasn't the issue your area had for concern. We never changed over any of our 125 SP IH combines, but there were a big bunch of Massey Harris 21s that ended up with them. Maybe even some MH 27s, I can't remember for sure? Others who used IH combines did change those duals over to bomber tires.

Gary ;)

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Not on a hill.....but a good view of a 51 in action.....run from the Cat with a RA Hanson

control box for the leveler. Cutting on Pleasant Ridge SE of The Dalles, Oregon back

in 1970.

Found these on the internet sometime back, don't remember where. The one with the TD-14 must have been taken from a sales brochure.

post-6771-1168300303_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1168300370_thumb.jpg

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Couple more misc file photos. Clipping is self-explanatory, taken from 1974 Colfax, WA paper. Other one is of three brothers who always harvested together, different brand loyalties though. To the left is a 100% IHC outfit, TD-40 and Model 51 combine. Other two are CAT RD4's and Case Model W's, probably around 1940.post-6771-1168307817_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1168307873_thumb.jpg

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I always feel like I'm interupting, but I can't resist. Although they aren't making pull types any more, we are still using them, have been for years. Some pics (not so old though).

We ran just the 914 in the 80's, went to trade it in for the 1682 but they wouldn't give us much for it so we kept it. That's a 986, 3688, 7220 & 5250, and MX200 pulling. I sometime drag the 914 with the 806, just to seat the rings, and not get too spoiled. ;)

Farmerscott, thats a nice lineup of real red power you have there. Yes, those pull types were the real thing until everybody started straight cutting. Hard to get a 25 foot header on the newer pulltypes. I know IH made an 18 foot for the 1482 but no way could you make full use of a combine that size on 18 feet of cereal grains, or any other grain for that matter. There were a lot of 14/1682s sold in this area. And before that the 914 was very popular. As well, Massey 751, 851 pull types took up a big share of the pull type market. Can't forget the "long green line" with their 6601 pull type and previous to that the 65, 96 line of pto machines. I helped a friend harvest with his 65 back in the seventies. He pulled it with a late model 4020 power shift. Nice combination.

Heres a pic of my old Case pull type going waaayyyy back to 1973 or 74..

post-90-1168308194_thumb.jpg

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