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ozarks

Anybody ever run an old Vermeer 605F

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I'm looking for a cheap baler to make a 6 ft bale. Baler in question has about 5000 bales use and been shedded since new. How many bales does it take to wear them totally out? How heavy bale in dry grass? I see alot of people who did not go the full 6 ft. Is it too hard on belts and bearings?? Thanks for any commments.

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Never had any dealings with a 605F, but we run 2 605C's. Dad bought one of them new in 1974 or 75. We've had to replace bearings and sprockets and bushings, also the belts a few times, also the gear box once. They've been great balers great balers considering all the rolling they've done. Bales usually go between 1200 and 1500 lbs.

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We still run our 605F. We just love it and we were kicking around the idea of getting a newer one but there really isn't any reason. It makes nice even heavy bales if you want to. It doen't have any electronics so you neck gets kinda sore from watching your belts to make an even bale.

We always go to the full capacity. We were told that we could go until the pickup attatchment stopped truning. The belt tensioner is connected to the size indicator and when the bale gets the right size it stops; this way you can make sure all the bales are like peas in a pod for size.

Our belts are about shot and have been that way for about 5 years and the cords are showing. We do about 500 bales a year with it and so far since we have owned it we have put in a couple of bearings, which are easy to do. Make sure it has the five bar pickup. I think some only had 4.

Starting bales with this baler can be tricky especially if the windrow is small. Sometimes it wants to start the bale ahead of the roller outside of the baler. What we do is just go really fast to start and then slow down.

Hope this helps!!

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Yes the first 605 F balers had 4 pickup bars then went to 5. The Super F had 6 bars and I am not sure but there might even be 6 in some of the later F's. The bottom drive roller on the Supers had a type of double roller bearing the F's had a ball bearing. Take a close look at the pickup on the baler, grab the pickup teeth and see if the bar moves very much. They have a steel bushings that the pins and eccenctric (SP) ride in. They are greased but many of the are wore bad enough that the bushings don't fit tight in the spider. Even if you grease them often there is nothing to hold the grease in. There is an update kit available with the fiber bushings and polished pins that aren't greased. Also check the tailgate pins for wear and cracks where they are welded to the frame I have seen them break off and really mess up the tailgate. Over all they are a good baler and if you take your time you can build some nice bales with them. Good third crop alfalfa bales can weigh as much as 1500 lbs plus.

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weve ran an "F" since about 1984 or so. on the question of when are they wore out, never, unless they catch fire or get ran over by a bulldozer :blink: . also you dont have to have a 5 bar pickup, ours just has the 4 bar and we get along fine. at the time they were built, i believe they were the best balers made. that being said there are much better ones today wich is why in my signature youll see id like to have a "K". check the sprokets and chain for wear too. if you can, turn the machine and look for bent shafts, if a bearing has been ran out and got the shaft hot it will often times warp them.

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We're running a 605F currently and I'm trying to figure out what all is needed to take the pickup reel off the baler. One of those bushing pins on the left side (facing the pickup) has a broken off grease fitting and to my delight I found you don't have enough space to pull out the pin in order to extract the broken zerk. Has anyone faced this problem before? I'm tempted to say to heck with it and dab a bunch of graphite around the pin unless getting the whole reel out is easier than it looks.


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We're running a 605F currently and I'm trying to figure out what all is needed to take the pickup reel off the baler. One of those bushing pins on the left side (facing the pickup) has a broken off grease fitting and to my delight I found you don't have enough space to pull out the pin in order to extract the broken zerk. Has anyone faced this problem before? I'm tempted to say to heck with it and dab a bunch of graphite around the pin unless getting the whole reel out is easier than it looks.

The pickup is held in place by the drum roller shaft (big bottom roller with rods on it). You have to remove the v belt pulley from the right side, then you have to cut the bearings off the shaft for the drum roller. There is one bearing on each side holding the pickup side plates to the drum roller shaft. The side plates hook up and over the drum roller shaft. Disconnect the support rods from the top of the pickup and you should be able to drop it out of the machine. Use a floor jack under each side and raise the tongue of the baler with a loader tractor and the pickup should slide right out from under the baler.

You'll have to take off the side plate of the side you want to work on which will most likely require cutting more bearings and when you get in there you'll probably find more problems than you knew existed. We used to do pickup rebuilds in the shop frequently and it would run up over the $2K mark easily. This was a complete rebuild though with new pins, bushings and eccentrics throughout the pickup. The bearings are cheap compared to what the pins and eccentrics cost. Depending on how much time, ambition and financing you have you may want to try to drill out the broken zerk in the baler or drill the hole and put in a bigger size zerk.

Jesse

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I'm looking for a cheap baler to make a 6 ft bale. Baler in question has about 5000 bales use and been shedded since new. How many bales does it take to wear them totally out? How heavy bale in dry grass? I see alot of people who did not go the full 6 ft. Is it too hard on belts and bearings?? Thanks for any commments.

When the baler is in good condition it makes nice tight bales. When things get sloppy they are a pain to operate. Couple things to check for: pickup condition (full on repair of worn pickup can cost more than the baler is worth), belt condition (again a set of belts can run more than the baler is worth), belt widths (if it has all 4" belts its going to be hard to stop the outside belts from twisting, you'd want to look for wide belts on the outside and 4" belts in the middle or 9" belts all the way across the baler).

Also look to see if the density cylinder is self contained. Self contained cylinders make better bales because you are not relying on the tractor hydraulics to hold pressure on the bale as it is being formed.

Jesse

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Thanks Jesse for the info. I found a way around doing all of that work. My Dad would pull a Fred Sanford if he saw me cutting bearings. Looking at the manual, it claimed there was an access hole behind the pickup pulley on the left side. I put a pipe wrench on the tensioner and slipped the belt off and then I had to put a puller on the pulley which came off fairly easy. After this I noticed no "access hole" the manual claimed. It's an old model-4 pickup reels-so I'm guessing the manual is newer. I measured the distance from the lip to about where the grease zerk was and marked it. I then drilled a .75" hole through the wall behind where the pulley was. This allowed me enough space to get an easy out in the zerk and I was able to replace all 4 zerks. Two took grease easily, the other two took alot of pressure to get grease into. I remember someone stating earlier they were supposed to be sealed so I'm hoping thats why they were hard to get grease into. I also found the 4 zerks on the other side-the bearings for the spider gear. To my knowledge these have never been greased until I found them so I'm sure there's been some wear. After greasing everything and replacing 10 missing teeth ($6 a piece at the local Case IH dealer!) I ran the baler and everything sounds and runs pretty good. Now we just need dry weather and our 856 back from the mechanic getting a new clutch.

As for starting a new bale, this is the hardest part to running one of these. What I do leave the baler off while running over a winrow for about 10 ft and let the hay pile up on the pickup. I'll stop and then hit the PTO. The piled up hay usually feeds in and starts me out a new, even bale. There's nothing more terrifying to me when I see the belts start pulling to one side because the hay bale is uneven. Worse yet seeing one twist! Overall I enjoy running it even though my neck is usually stiff from constantly looking back. These balers require constant vigilance because I've twisted belts once, and I never want to go through the process of un twisting them ever again.

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I know this is an old thread. run as fast as you can from a Vermeer 605. at one time about half the balers were Vermeer around here now maybe .5% are. they are a hard starting to get hay in and if conditions change just a little you might as well go get drunk you will be more productive. my brother and I bought one in1997 used it one year for 800 bales and it was gone the next spring for a case ih baler now we run a jd 567 they are a very good baler

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Thanks Jesse for the info. I found a way around doing all of that work. My Dad would pull a Fred Sanford if he saw me cutting bearings. Looking at the manual, it claimed there was an access hole behind the pickup pulley on the left side. I put a pipe wrench on the tensioner and slipped the belt off and then I had to put a puller on the pulley which came off fairly easy. After this I noticed no "access hole" the manual claimed. It's an old model-4 pickup reels-so I'm guessing the manual is newer. I measured the distance from the lip to about where the grease zerk was and marked it. I then drilled a .75" hole through the wall behind where the pulley was. This allowed me enough space to get an easy out in the zerk and I was able to replace all 4 zerks. Two took grease easily, the other two took alot of pressure to get grease into. I remember someone stating earlier they were supposed to be sealed so I'm hoping thats why they were hard to get grease into. I also found the 4 zerks on the other side-the bearings for the spider gear. To my knowledge these have never been greased until I found them so I'm sure there's been some wear. After greasing everything and replacing 10 missing teeth ($6 a piece at the local Case IH dealer!) I ran the baler and everything sounds and runs pretty good. Now we just need dry weather and our 856 back from the mechanic getting a new clutch.

As for starting a new bale, this is the hardest part to running one of these. What I do leave the baler off while running over a winrow for about 10 ft and let the hay pile up on the pickup. I'll stop and then hit the PTO. The piled up hay usually feeds in and starts me out a new, even bale. There's nothing more terrifying to me when I see the belts start pulling to one side because the hay bale is uneven. Worse yet seeing one twist! Overall I enjoy running it even though my neck is usually stiff from constantly looking back. These balers require constant vigilance because I've twisted belts once, and I never want to go through the process of un twisting them ever again.

I have seen this done before in a much more crude fashion (torch). I've seen it mainly on the other side as you were working on because the eccentrics are "L" shaped and the hole isn't big enough to get them out so people make the hole bigger. If you had trouble getting grease in I'm sure the passage is full of hardened grease and dirt. It's tough to get grease through without removing the pins from the machine and cleaning them.

As far as starting the bale goes it's kind of a guess until you know the crop conditions and baler condition. Putting all the teeth in will help a lot. Another thing that helps is putting new springs on the belt tension arm. If the belts are tight and turning all the time the bale starts a lot better. 2 new springs should run around $3-400 if I remember correctly. Another trick I've heard for starting a bale is to leave the tailgate open far enough to make the belts turn nicely and start feeding hay and when you see the core start close the tailgate. I wouldn't recommend this exactly because you could twist the tailgate pretty easily, but I've heard of guys doing it.

On a side note: if you are ever thinking about upgrading for a little bit of money you should go right to the 605 Super J or at least a late model J with the heavy roller shafts. The 605J's have been dropping in price significantly in the last couple years. What we sold for $6k about four years ago is now bringing around $3k. A Super J will make you think you've died and gone to heaven compared to running the 605 F.

Jesse

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I too have a 605F. I've been thru all the hard starting bales, and the twisting belts too. Old timer who sold these balers for many years told me to go sideways to the windrow for starting a bale in hard conditions. Works very well, I just go across 5 or 6 windrows sideways and then go back and head down my row. I baled about 400 CRP hay bales last year with it and they weighed around 1200. Baling dry grass hay with it though, I feel you lose a lot of hay due to the narrow belts and the spacing between the belts.

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