Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

Recommended Posts

Sure is a great picture of the AutoWagon delivery truck--------looks like he even has a couple of chickens in the coop.

Roger needs one of those cabs (canopy).   Reminds me a lot of the "buggy top" umbrellas for the little N series Ford tractors.

*******

What's the story on the upside down combine??  Header, cab, etc. appears to be not harmed-------how did it flip??

 

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

These aren't IH Tractors on a Montana Farm.... I got them off of an IH site on Facebook. I do know they are from "corn country." Some raise corn in eastern Montana now, I believe? But when I was a kid, I never saw anything like it. Our short growing season doesn't help corn growers. When I was a kid, I'd drive atop Beaver Creek hill and walk to our neighbor's out of sight junk pile. Vinje Long had tried raising corn. He had planters, harvesters and other stuff related to corn growing. It was all fence cornered. Gary;)

59f73a529c511_IHFarmallMwithcornharvesterpullingwagoninfieldDaleJensen.thumb.jpg.04d132ff5697f2d3ee76809e151c1a77.jpg

59f73a646c585_IHCMcCormickDeeringcornpickeronF-20.thumb.jpg.44a5f2e8d03cbc002fbb5a8bc58fe3a0.jpg

59f73a5aecdf9_IHFarmallCornharvestequipmentRogerKernsJr..jpg.84a76bbdb1c8d2d0ff6934f46075f40a.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quite a bit of corn in the park city Yellowstone valley....most silage but some for corn all irrigated...

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Those New Idea mounted pickers when mounted on Ms were responsible for a lot of failed bearings and broken axles in this part of the country.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
7 hours ago, mader656 said:

Quite a bit of corn in the park city Yellowstone valley....most silage but some for corn all irrigated...

mader656, I stated: "Some raise corn in eastern Montana now, I believe?" Eastern Montana was Billings in my head. I remember when we lived there for four years in the early 1970's, they were raising corn silage. I think my friend's farm out on the west end is no longer corn, but houses? I'm sure there is more corn being raised in eastern Montana than there  used to be? I still don't think of tropical Montana as "corn country." Gary;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

mader656, I stated: "Some raise corn in eastern Montana now, I believe?" Eastern Montana was Billings in my head. I remember when we lived there for four years in the early 1970's, they were raising corn silage. I think my friend's farm out on the west end is no longer corn, but houses? I'm sure there is more corn being raised in eastern Montana than there  used to be? I still don't think of tropical Montana as "corn country." Gary;)

Manitoba wasn't either but is now well as long as I can remember though, at first we only had corn silage but since a view years now we also combine it. First with a classic 1460 IH Combine.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

While on the subject of corn----

Here is a picture of a collection of my grandpa's old pipes which includes a corn cob pipe.

Question for the experts:

IF the barrell (pot) of the corn cob pipe is actually cob------how was it hardened so to stand the heat??  This one is as hard as hard wood-----see bottom of the pipe in last picture.  I have seen local pipes made from locally grown cobs that were just whittled out and smoked-----but they never seemed to last very long???  Was there a more sophisticated process??

20171030_203752.thumb.jpg.fa260187e0f8d517173d46a4e75516b7.jpg

 

20171030_203329.thumb.jpg.52e9f094e3c3bca6d37484a8a826955c.jpg

 

20171030_203345.thumb.jpg.78615cd6187c78715420f26bd5f5b347.jpg

 

Grampa died in 1960-----Nixon was running for president at the time.  I found the Nixon/Lodge campaign pin and stuck it on the old rubber stamp holder------converted to the pipe stand.

Never had really thought about the corn cob pipes until now.  The pipe pictured was smoked for several years that I remember.

Hoping someone can shed some light on the subject

edit:   (the old shaving mug brush was his also--------another item faded away by the times)

 

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Corn cob pipes continued---

according to "google":

cobs are aged for 2+ yrs (adding hardness)

hollowed out with plaster paris applied to inside of bowl

sometime wooden plug installed in bottom (this is apparently what I see on the pipe pictured above)

outside coated with lacquer 

The corn cob pipe is supposed to give a distinctive flavor.

******

I never smoked, so somewhat ignorant on the subject.   But along the lines that "curiosity killed the cat"------I do understand that corn liquor also has a distinctive flavor also (cough/gag)!!!!:o:huh:

 

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 10/22/2017 at 9:32 PM, Old Binder Guy said:

Ron, It sounds like you're going to be in the Ross Fork Creek & Judith River country. I may have known names of forerunners of the place you're heading? I find I don't know any of the 45 year old "kids" who've taken over their parent's places. I'm guessing you might be near Ross Fork, Ware, Danvers, Kolin, or somewhere in that vicinity? I hope you enjoy yourself and don't run into snow.

 

Gary,

Directions changed later. We loaded calves at the Deerfield Colony NW of Lewiston. Pretty country. Crossed the Judith River twice on the way to the ranch, then went WAY down in a valley to load. Had a half inch or so of snow when I got there Wednesday night, but didn't give any problems---not near as unpleasant as the 25 mph north wind that played with me for the entire 16 hour drive home. Didn't see any smoke or steam, clouds about half the day, a little snow east of Aberdeen.  I think I could live in that country, but doubt of my wife would go for that!

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ron, I sure know where the Deerfield Colony is! I used to know quite a few of the Hutterites around central Montana and their several colonies. I wouldn't know any of them anymore, except at the King Colony. A couple of the kids I used to hire are old men there now. Probably our steam and smoke wouldn't show up 160 miles away? We had a good day of steaming and put things to bed for the winter. Gary;)

PS: Anson, thanks for taking over on the corncob pipe issue. That corncob pipe is a real classic, if looks mean anything! You know more about them than I do. And the corn squeezin's too, it sounds?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't have any IH Tractors on a Montana Farm photos for today. (well I could find plenty in files) These IHC tractors are from Facebook. This one is for Anson. It's a couple of IHC Farmall F-20's and pretty late in production.

59fb9c3f30e33_TwoFarmallF-20tractorsfarmingIHC.jpg.b113bacd418aa1c78c33d60056103123.jpg

Here's a Farmall F-14 IHC tractor running an ensilage cutter, filling a silo.

59fb9c458b39a_IHCF-14onsteelwheelsensilagecutteratsiloOctober1939nearWestCarltonOregon.jpg.7450161a596fe6f52218db388ec9bf9c.jpg

Here are an IHC Farmall Regular and a 10-20 McCormick-Deering cultivating and seeding potatoes in North Dakota.

59fb9c60b3795_ParkRiverNorthDakota1928McCormick-Deeringregular10-20tractorsIHC.jpg.0a69460ca0a92c35fe87ba932710f75a.jpg

And some cotton country IHC photos from Anson's part of the country. This first one is a Farmall Regular doing something regarding cotton.

59fb9c5790a1a_June1937.HillhouseMississippiDeltacooperativefarmIHCMcCormickDeeringFarmallRegulartractor.thumb.jpg.85ae7f0ef8a27b1163184800a964d4cd.jpg 

And this is a mechanized cotton plantation with a Farmall Regular near the house. I wonder what that tank is atop the fuel tank?

59fb9c4d51a1d_mechanizedcottonplantation.AldridgePlantationnearLelandMississippiIHCFarmallRegular.thumb.jpg.5362cc4b231071ce2a402f3a20b0a32b.jpg

And this is an itinerant cotton worker and his daughter on the running board of his 1926 Model T Coupe. Roger could tell you, "that is one mighty fine automobile!"

59fb9c7716e9d_Texasmigrantcottonworker1926ModelTCoupegirlonrunningboard.thumb.jpg.4c9682c3b9d9c7cb4d133be52347e27e.jpg

This is the one I bought in 1953 for $15. I'll attest to it being a mighty fine automobile as well. This was not long after I acquired it and gave it a fantastic brush paint job of black enamel. Gary;)

59fb9ed3bda75_1926ModelTCoupeGarys1953IvarSandorig.jpg.1c34e3a4fe724d47c471a21bc0386f59.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like they might be cultivating previously cross plowed cotton in a heavily grass/weed infested field??  (hard to find the cotton----but I believe that is what the crop is)

But I have never seen a full rear mount cultivator on a Regular or F-20.  And-----I see a wooden pole stuck in the end of the open tool bar.

Looks like an old bush and bog style cutting disk in the left corner of the tractor an house picture.  (probably had wooden boxings?)

 

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
11 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

And this is a mechanized cotton plantation with a Farmall Regular near the house. I wonder what that tank is atop the fuel tank?

I wonder if it's a early LP tank system. I've seen some odd looking set-ups on the F series with LP.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I didn't think of propane, twostepn2001. It sure could be?

Maybe they were thinking of burning  propane in this undermounted Avery steam engine? It has an extra tank too. ;-)  Gary;)

59fc8b972eaa8_22hpundermountedAvery.WatertankoroilburneratopboilerbarrelMarkC.jpg.5b1674a5bd183c1102aa3dfcc4fc95c9.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Two step likes propane------so do I, and my daddy liked it.

Not quite as neat mounts as in the house/tractor picture discussed earlier, but here are some of my dad's L-P tank mounts.

 

F-20 with belly mount 4 row planter----LP tank mounted on front

20171104_170626.thumb.jpg.0bfb0f98c60e5fb80c572c28b7761469.jpg

 

Farmall Regular-----LP tank mounted in lieu of conventional fuel tank

20171104_164805.thumb.jpg.2488f500c458ed07b9354b5c63893f68.jpg

 

Farmall Regular with L-P tank mounted to rear.  This tractor had two liquid fertilizer tanks strapped on it as fender tanks-----circa 1947/1948.  One of the earliest mounting of liquid tanks on a tractor that I remember.

20171104_181254.thumb.jpg.e160c04aa9b40fcc3433380ecfc1f382.jpg

 

Shot of Farmall M hyd belly pump mounted on the above Regular

20171104_171602.thumb.jpg.b2856ab6cdfeba21de63897a53c1308a.jpg

 

20171104_171625.thumb.jpg.338d6b1ff0e6d758f33be5e31ec7c0c5.jpg

 

My old daddy was very innovative-----but nothing was left as an orignal once he modified it to his liking.  Ironically-----I never was bashful about cutting/welding on new paint.

 

DD 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

More from my stroll through my "scrap iron graveyard"------

From 1937 M-H Challenger

20171104_171227.thumb.jpg.df579409eaa4496e154705691f0c0290.jpg

 

F-20 gear shift pattern

20171104_180711.thumb.jpg.7b27c84044ade84fd7357db91ce40e94.jpg

 

Dog style clutch driving liquid fertilizer pump on Farmall Regular

20171104_181358.thumb.jpg.3b730a106e50fa5bbbc321d107f5c55c.jpg

 

All kept in my favorite rusty/dusty paint scheme.

 

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/4/2017 at 9:18 PM, Delta Dirt said:

Two step likes propane------so do I, and my daddy liked it.

Yep I do...lol   Guess cause it is what l grew up with. This one pic you posted looks like a later style tank on that F-20, like off a M?  Did your Dad build that system himself?

 

LP-F-20-1-Avon, Miss.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

TwoStep----

He mounted the tanks himself-----had some help from L-P distributor on vaporizer, etc and then did the rest himself (with farm labor).

Basically all done at one time sometime in late 40's----maybe 1950;-----including acquisition of  6,000 gallon bulk tank.  I was just a kid.

I remember him buying L-P gas out of Eldorada, Arkansas for $0.03/gallon-------that basically paid the trucking for the refinery to get rid of it.  Otherwise-----they were burning it off.

L-P most likely caught his attention through his early development work on the flame cultivator at the end of WWII.

*******

Tractor pictured in your quote is a REGULAR---------with the new style F-20 enclosed steering box.

DD 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I swept these photos up on a site on Facebook today.  I'm thinking with that left side hood panel, this has to be a McCormick-Deering 22-36?

5a03b7063c659_22-36IHCMcCormickDeeringTracyGoldsmith.jpg.ec189c3c101c0afce64da567aabe210b.jpg

And this is an F-12 McCormick-Deering Farmall with a mounted cultivator.

5a03b6fd0b11c_TracyGoldsmithsmotherherbrotherwithIHCF-12Farmall.jpg.277f3c23659f1e1c26b1cf3a6de42b97.jpg

And the lady's last photo was of this Farmall H with steel rear wheels and rubber fronts. They're likely not IH Tractors on a Montana Farm? Gary;)

5a03b71321953_TracyGoldsmithsgrandparentsonIHCFarmallH.jpg.ee41036ad20df46bba245d1ae3141e3f.jpg

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went to Silver Creek this morning after I had a CT scan at the hospital (to do with the concussion I had, falling off of the steam engine last month.) I was able to put together a torn apart Coleman gas lantern I'd recently found at a junk shop. It is an early nickel tank, cobalt top, mica screen, mounted pump type, from a lot of years ago. It worked out pretty well. I don't plan to ever use it. It's just for decoration. 

5a06624099c63_Colemancobaltshademicalensnickeltankgaslantern311-10-17.thumb.jpg.906c7d96f933a72fa896cb000656829a.jpg

5a066255d40a3_Colemancobaltshademicalensnickeltankgaslantern11-10-17.thumb.jpg.d8ee91bd36d6acfb67796b394a951e8a.jpg

I've had these other nickel tank Coleman lanterns for quite a while.

5a0663c6d7030_NickeltankColemangasLanterns8-16-16.thumb.JPG.c4370357572220b6f8b375303234ea85.JPG

Mike had the day off. His company gives military veterans a day off of work for this holiday, tomorrow.

5a0662841898c_Mikeandhissweatshirtelephantinthelivingroom11-10-17.thumb.jpg.9e7aaac5d927d6f8a67c5055a01159e9.jpg

Mike has been working feverishly this fall and until today, on an older camper he bought to place on property he owns up in the mountains, near Wolf Creek, Montana. He removed all water system parts, built two beds where lesser chintzy beds had been, removed the bathroom and added a small wood cook stove. He will pull the wheels off of it and build a roof over it, once it is moved there in the spring. Mike was wanting to get the trailer out of the shop, so he could put the IH 300 Utility inside, where it belongs in winter, for plowing roads. And this 300 Utility is an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!  Gary;)

Mike & Pam's trailer outside of shop & shed 11-10-17.jpg

Trailer out, IH 300 Utility in shop 11-10-17.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Professor----

I will furnish you with a polka dot hard hat if you will come down an organize my junked up shop.  Mike's always looks immaculate.

Funny about this falling situation-----it happens in a snap of your fingers;---------but, seems like I am falling for a day and a half!!!!  Can't help from laughing at yourself-------while you are cringing from the pain.  And----then you feel the pain more the next day.

Never felt the train wrecks when playing football-------now you feel the licks through the TV.   What happened along the way??:blink::o

 

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Anson, you find me a Kromer Polkadot Hard Hat, and I'll send you this "Stetson" hard hat of mine. It sounds like a great trade to me? Oh............. :huh:, you meant organize YOUR shop? I might not live through it? I have to admit, organizing Mike's new shop has been fun for me, in retirement. Gary;)

5a07bfafb325a_Cowboystetsonhardhatselfie2-4-2015red.jpg.5a2fee54d85e2c41bc07b611f743bd90.jpg

PS: I'd love to "organize" or look through your junk piles, and retired tractor yard!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went searching for this thread. There it was on page 3. I sure haven't known anything new lately. I found this on Facebook this morning and thought it belonged here. I spent enough time stuck in mud over the years. A TD-18 or a 403 combine are harder to get out than this 10-20 McCormick Deering. But this guy probably only had horses to go harness to pull this out? Maybe he's wishing he'd stuck with horses, then he wouldn't be in this fix? This is the caption that was with it:

“ If i would’ve known that 81 years later y’all would be staring at me on Facebook on your phone stuck in a field i would’ve never took this picture. “

5a0c72d1095d6_McCormickDeering10-20stuckinmudGaryW.jpg.4decef6e054c5c831dbe1416b2968f1d.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I went searching for this thread. There it was on page 3. I sure haven't known anything new lately. I found this on Facebook this morning and thought it belonged here. I spent enough time stuck in mud over the years. A TD-18 or a 403 combine are harder to get out than this 10-20 McCormick Deering. But this guy probably only had horses to go harness to pull this out? Maybe he's wishing he'd stuck with horses, then he wouldn't be in this fix? This is the caption that was with it:

“ If i would’ve known that 81 years later y’all would be staring at me on Facebook on your phone stuck in a field i would’ve never took this picture. “

5a0c72d1095d6_McCormickDeering10-20stuckinmudGaryW.jpg.4decef6e054c5c831dbe1416b2968f1d.jpg

Reminds me of a story my grandfather told me years ago, when a FORDSON tractor got stuck in the potato field during the war years and only two oxen were able to pull him out.

-Urs

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yes, Urs... Sometimes things get muddy. This is one of my least muddy situations, but it's the only one I have a picture of. 5a0cfab7be221_TD-18AA160truckOopsCrystalLakeRoadGaryYaeger.jpg.f37edd6aa1e627a6554d514e5ffa31c3.jpg

And the only other muddy picture I have is when Dad got stuck filling in a slough where the creek used to run.  Gary;)

5a0cfaf51980f_Three3TD-40sstuckinBeaverCreekBillBobWilliamJoeYaeger1951.thumb.jpg.7ea79308909c9a901ffd7fd8fd0bbbde.jpg

By the way, these were all IH Tractors on a Montana Farm too!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now