Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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12 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

Gary might take delivery as long as you pack that stuff inside a load of watermelons???  Shhhh, don't tell him...

Todd....   Hmmmm.... I must need to check the loads these IHC AutoWagons are to be hauling to Montana? I doubt the "stripper" is hidden in those melons, but I guess they could be?

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But, maybe it's in the other AutoWagon? But if you put Anson in it as driver, he'd never make it to Montana.  Gary:huh:

59c9aec3def60_IHCAutowagonwithladiesgirlsgirliesbabesswimsuits.jpg.29e0fb6ebd43c476b6b828c79420d247.jpg

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10 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Todd....   Hmmmm.... I must need to check the loads these IHC AutoWagons are to be hauling to Montana? I doubt the "stripper" is hidden in those melons, but I guess they could be?

59c9aeb1160a9_IHCAutoWagonhaulingmelons.jpg.253f0bd99d7b2f75982d40c105b59250.jpg

But, maybe it's in the other AutoWagon? But if you put Anson in it as driver, he'd never make it to Montana.  Gary:huh:

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Ha ha ha ha ha. I think the cargo in the first one would be a little safer :blink:

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33 minutes ago, Old Binder Guy said:

Todd....   Hmmmm.... I must need to check the loads these IHC AutoWagons are to be hauling to Montana? I doubt the "stripper" is hidden in those melons, but I guess they could be?

59c9aeb1160a9_IHCAutoWagonhaulingmelons.jpg.253f0bd99d7b2f75982d40c105b59250.jpg

But, maybe it's in the other AutoWagon? But if you put Anson in it as driver, he'd never make it to Montana.  Gary:huh:

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Well we know we can't trust our highly respected friend Roger.  Don't see where I should be expected to behave any different.  Both loads (and AutoWagons) would be very enticing to an old codger.:)

******

tractor subject:

Here is a picture of the "two-hole shifter plate" we were discussing recently for use on a low drum cotton picker.  This M  (no serial number) came off of some catfish ponds and is a mixture of several M's-----to make one good runner (typical of catfish operations where the M's were popular as pto power units).  Note the galvanized pipe for the steering wheel stand.  This tractor is in pretty decent shape (including new rubber and electronic ignition)--------maybe I will crank her off sometime this winter.

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In years past-------I have seen some fish ponds with 20-----30 runnable M's sitting in their paddlewheel line up.  And usually------there was a large inventory of scrap tractors for parts.  Those days are gone now.

 

DD 

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On an otherwise slow and drag-a$$ing day--------I just learned that the use of aluminum came into play much earlier than I ever realized.

According to my Google search-----aluminum became "somewhat" economically feasible in 1889.

Sitting here and admiring what my wife refers to as "the Western Collection"-----and Wrangler and myself just always called "cowboy corner";-------I was wondering how old the cast aluminum hitching post might be.  The hitching post has been welded back together at sometime in it's life-------I picked all of these pieces up at various resale shops over a long period of time.  (never realizing that I should have been collecting guitars and accordions):o

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Worth noting-----the ladies walking stick hanging to the left came from Montana.  A friend brought it back to my wife a couple of years ago.

******

Reckon our buddy Roger is asleep-----didn't even get a rouse out of him with my last comment.  May be that he is loading the Big Four tractor onto the mighty AutoWagon??

DD 

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Well Anson, with some of the comments on this form, I just consider the source and ignore the remark!:lol:

No, I haven't been doing any trucking with the Autowagon or the Shovel Nose this fall . . . at least not so far.   I'm now back working on the second Big Four project after a break for the month of August.  Of course during August I worked on my 10-20 Titan, a friends 10-20 Titan, my 8-16 International and a friends 10-20 Mogul.  Just wanted you guys to know I wasn't loafing and hard at work(??):rolleyes: on some old International tractors . . .  gotta keep those old girls running!

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I've been gone a few days. Sharon and I went up to the Flathead Valley (where I started this nonsense) to visit old friends. I also went to Cousin Dan Tombrink's to visit and photograph tractors. I chose his variations of the International and McCormick W-4's. His I-4 is very interesting. Then two different types of orchard 4's. And last, but not least is his dad's W-4 he bought new. It still has original front tires on it and has never been restored. He plans to leave it that way, Roger! PS: These are IH Tractors on a Montana Farm too!

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Then when we arrived home last night, Mike texted me asking what I was doing today. It was supposed to be rainy. It wasn't real nice weather, but it wasn't rainy. And when on the platform of a Reeves steam engine, it is pretty decent with the fire burning. We got short changed for steaming time this summer, due to the severe drought and all of the extreme fire conditions. We weren't allowed to light fires of any kind, not long after we'd threshed in August. So this is the first time since then. Mike is oiling the 20 hp Reeves at the woodpile.

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And, Roger.... It is so kind of you to send your IHC AutoWagon to Anson to haul watermelons to Silver Creek. I'll owe you big time! Gary;)

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I don't know anything.... It's snowing in Helena. I did go drain pipes and valves on the steam engines this afternoon. The overnight low tomorrow night is supposed to be 21 degrees. The weather is supposed to warm up again after tomorrow night.

I thought of you guys in corn country. I don't know the first thing about raising corn, other than the sweet corn we used to raise to be killed by frost each fall. But I like this F-20 with a corn picker mounted. It looks neat. This gentleman runs one of the IH sites on Facebook and it is his birthday today.  Gary;)

59d2c7104c008_IHCMcCormickDeeringcornpickeronF-20.thumb.jpg.1df21f63bd7d55e78bb2285c689d1d84.jpg

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Spent Sunday afternoon Bush-Hogging at my nephew's Duck Hole with the Case 2090.  (tract enrolled in Wetland Reserve Program)

Unusally wet summer------plus 12" rain in the remnants of hurricane Harvey that passed over us resulted in massive growth of weeds/grass and an absolute full duck hole.  The drain pipe is choked with debris--------probably be next summer before getting it cleared.

Was absolutely "feeling" my way on some of this elevated levee road.  (approx 30 ft width)-----the tall weeds are rag-weed (LOTS of pollen).

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Plenty of water for ducks------but unfortunately won't be much natural food source for them.   Wetland needs to dry up during hot summer months so that smart weed and the small seeded grasses germinate and mature.  We have seeded millet in areas in years past-----will be interesting to see if the millet re-generates in these conditions.

All of this water-------and the West has been so dry.  I had A/C on in tractor and it's snowing in Montana (one extreme to the other).

 

DD 

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Gee I thought ragweed only grows tall on dairy farms. 

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1 hour ago, BOBSIH856 said:

Gee I thought ragweed only grows tall on dairy farms. 

Interesting thing I learned about ragweed this year was that it only grows taller than its competition.  In a corn field it outgrows the corn by a foot or two. In a bean field it outgrows the beans by a foot or two. You won't find a 14' ragweed plant in a bean field. Not sure about a dairy farm. Maybe it tries to outgrow the silo? :)

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9 minutes ago, Sledgehammer said:

Interesting thing I learned about ragweed this year was that it only grows taller than its competition.  In a corn field it outgrows the corn by a foot or two. In a bean field it outgrows the beans by a foot or two. You won't find a 14' ragweed plant in a bean field. Not sure about a dairy farm. Maybe it tries to outgrow the silo? :)

Or the barn roof. I used to drive silage truck on weekends for a friend that custom chops. We went to a couple of farms where you could just see the peek of the barn roof. The rag weed was tall and thick.

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Have also

always heard of "giant ragweed".  If this stuff ain't giant-------I don't need to meet up with the real giant ragweed.:o

I never remember seeing much ragweed here locally-------seems like it showed up in the last 20 yrs.

From all reports I have-------it has no positive benefits for wildlife??

DD 

 

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9 minutes ago, Delta Dirt said:

Have also

always heard of "giant ragweed".  If this stuff ain't giant-------I don't need to meet up with the real giant ragweed.:o

I never remember seeing much ragweed here locally-------seems like it showed up in the last 20 yrs.

From all reports I have-------it has no positive benefits for wildlife??

DD 

 

gives a lot of thick cover but nothing eats it that I know of.  

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I don't know a darn thing, but wanted to drag this up out of the basement. McCormick and McCormick-Deering dominates, from Facebook. A McCormick-Deering grain drill and an old horse pulled disk getting buried in a 1935 Kansas dust storm.

59d6cbf907aca_McCormick-DeeringgraindrillKansasDustStormofdirtythirties1935.thumb.jpg.3e36f587f4b7c10f0d1797817409be33.jpg

 A McCormick (I do see a double globe IHC decal) Daisy Reaper behind a team of horses. These reapers were built by IH clear into the late 1930's. Mostly for export sales. Some of Urs' relatives in Switzerland may have even had one?

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I have most of one in this pile at Silver Creek. It's short the little end wheel and a pitman. I have the rake's patterns up in the rafters of the shed. I doubt I'll live long enough to get enthusiasm enough to restore it?

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My dad and his brothers used to have a McCormick-Deering milking machine pump in the "cow barn" and the buckets and milkers in the basement. I saw them used, but never used them.

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Just to say I put an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm, here is a picture of nephew Randy backing our 1939 Farmall H, Annie into the shed, after we got the engines out of the shed this past spring. It's getting time to reverse this procedure. We've had some freezing weather in the past week. I've drained the piping though. We'll likely fire them up and put them away in the next week or two? Gary;)

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PS: The procedure will be just the reverse of this, only we put them away under steam, and not pulled by a TD-40 TracTracTor.

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5 hours ago, Old Binder Guy said:

I don't know a darn thing, but wanted to drag this up out of the basement. McCormick and McCormick-Deering dominates, from Facebook. A McCormick-Deering grain drill and an old horse pulled disk getting buried in a 1935 Kansas dust storm.

Gary;)

 

 

 

 

There is an old wooden box McCormick seed drill at my brother's farm that must be pretty old. Unfortunately the elements have not been kind to it in outdoor storage. 

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On 10/5/2017 at 11:42 PM, Loadstar said:

There is an old wooden box McCormick seed drill at my brother's farm that must be pretty old. Unfortunately the elements have not been kind to it in outdoor storage. 

Ralph, I've seen quite a few old wooden box grain drills that time hasn't been kind to. I'm not surprised about your brother's drill. I've seen a very few wooden box drills that were kept inside that were nice, but those were few and far between. When I was a young kid, my dad and brothers had steel box McCormick Deering double disk grain drills in this same style. They had a hitch made that pulled three of these 12' grain drills. I remember when Dad traded these for 2 later type of double disk that had fertilizer attachments. Then later we traded those for 150 shovel drills. Now we've gone back to the archaic type at Silver Creek. Even in a green color of sorts. Mike poses with the old free gift John Deere Van Brunt grain drill, behind his 1944 Farmall M, Toot.

59d9968d21b16_IHFarmallMTootVanBruntstoppedMike4-10-15_edited-1.jpg.65075a1daa0280bf041a1c6b7a3f373a.jpg

I've even pulled it with 1939 Farmall H, Annie as evidenced in this "rear" view. Both of these tractors are IH Tractors on a Montana Farm! Gary;)

59d99698df5ea_MeAnnieFarmallHIHpullingVanBruntdrillseedingoats5-7-16.jpg.f59e1374915e670272f3324659657f3e.jpg

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The last couple of weeks, part of my free time has been take up with helping a 99 year old friend and his family put on a little get-to-gether at their farm.   It's a semi-private event where we saw some wood, thrash a few loads of oats and do a little plowing.   A couple days are spent getting all the steamers and tractors ready to do some "real" work . . . well maybe just an hour or so ;) of doing what they were designed to do.  This year(Saturday) things didn't work out too well with getting 3" of rain making the ground very soft.   The Minneapolis steamer was parked on an old drive so we were able to move it over to the saw mill and cut some lumber between the rain showers.   The rest of the equipment had to stay where they set.   After a couple days of drying, we went back over and did the thrashing with the 25-50 Avery gas tractor on an Avery separator.   By the end of that day, the mud was washed off the steamers/tractors and the equipment was put back in the sheds. 

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Line up . . . John Deere D - early John Deere D with spoke flywheel - Rock Island - Rumely Oil Pull - 10-20 Titan - 22-36 McCormick Deering -  10-20 McCormick Deering.

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28 HP Minneapolis and 22 HP Advance steamers 

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45-65 Avery - 25-50 Avery - 12-25 Avery

 

 

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Roger-----

I am not sure that all of this fine looking and restored old equipment "hangs around you"------or--------"you hang around it"???

(either way-------it's always interesting)

******

Neighbor came by late this afternoon and insisted I ride over to the River with him.  Mississippi is at a low stage right now (11---11.5 on Greenville gauge) and he had cleared out a drive down ramp.

Looking upstream---Greenville Bridge in distance----if you zoom in.

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And looking downstream with northbound and southbound towboats passing in a narrow channel.

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Major transportation artery in my back door------drains water from 42% of the continental U.S. (including Roger and Gary's backyard)

Too scenic and peaceful not to post.

That's Arkansas across the River.

 

DD 

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Nice pics DD. Looks really peaceful there. 

Lots of Avery machines in the previous post. They were made in Peoria IL (5hrs North of me)if I remember correctly. There is a local man in town who had a close friend (possibly a military friend) from Peoria. Somehow he ended up with a large sign out of the Avery factory. I saw it once and it was probably 8'-10' tall and 15-20' wide. It said something about Avery transmissions on it. It came from a later generation several years after the prairie giants roamed the land but still an interesting piece of Avery advertising history. 

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I've been somewhat absent as of lately. We'd gone to Kalispell and Whitefish where we lived for 28 years, and we went to our granddaughter and husband's baby shower at Spokane. The grandma beside me in bed is going to be a great-grandma around Christmas. I took this selfie with granddaughter Mercedes and our daughter Michaelle, her mom. We were eating at the Longhorn (not Longbranch!) in Airway Heights of Spokane.

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This was at the shower the next day... Mercedes and husband Jeff, Michaelle, Grandma Bursch and Grandma (Nana) Yaeger.

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Mike's wife Pam graciously drove us in her vehicle, our granddaughter Heather and Grandma Sharon in this picture. I sure appreciated being able to just sit, not drive, and be able to "farm" all the way over.

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Roger...... I certainly appreciate you posting photos of Bud's steam up. I still have this picture of Ron, me, Bud and Roger from 2010, when I was there. I see Bud got the spoker flywheel repaired and back on the John Deere D. I'm pleased to see that!

59e0e9f79f564_28hpMinneapolisRonmeBudRoger.thumb.jpg.e2a10ebe68dca83c7fd35aaa623e0bbd.jpg 

Todd, I once had one of those Peoria built Avery engines too, in my much younger years. Caterpillar now occupies that factory, or much of it, I think? Gary;)

59e0ee4d3b8e5_Avery12-25atfarmBWimp.jpg.aba0d5d3cf9f8fd8d927db62e15c931b.jpg

 

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I sure know nothing, but I came upon some things on Facebook that might be of some interest. If you own a 10-20 or 15-30 tractor with the ball bearings on the crankshaft, it would appear they might still be under warranty? You may have to go to the "Gas Cap IH" to get it, as I doubt Case IH would stand behind this warranty of another company?

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I'd loved to have had some of these toys when I was a kid!

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This is a 125 SP McCormick IH combine, with the wide rear axle.  Besides the wide axle it has an unloading auger, but still has the high mounted grain tank.  The upper photo of the 45T IH hay baler and Farmall H could have been photographed on our place as well as wherever this was. However I remember the Farmall M mostly being used on that baler.

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It's newer than the 123 SP I grew up with as a young boy. Me and my cousin James here. I had my wooden pistol my big brother made me on dad's grinder and drill press. Gary;)

59e3a4d9ad810_IH123SPGaryJames.jpg.4a24de3b52c156e7171051977a750a38.jpg

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i still want a cap like your cousin, note the shade in his face, wherever you go,  you'er wearing your sun shade.  you two could be the orginal been farming long boys.        those old combines were made using already available parts, using those guide duals from a H, or M.  I am thinking the trans drive train is farmall A, including drive wheels, or was it truck parts?

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Was the 125 SP a replacement for the 123--------or a slightly larger machine manufactured at the same time?

I still have the remnants of a 125 that is now the remnants of a hoist (with winch and gin poles). My dad bought it in 1950+/-; --------parked it deep in the shed when he bought two 141s in 1954+/-.  I converted it to a hoist sometime in the 60's.

It had the lower (maybe larger?) mounted hopper than pictured in the advertisement -----engine was a pain to get to for slim people-------let alone for big folks.

Have posted pictures of it in years gone by------will try to snap a few pictures in next few days.  It has a Green Diamond engine------ ( maybe a 239 ??).

*******

Interesting advertisement on the lifetime warranty on the ballbearing crankshaft------I have heard of that warranty before.

I don't have a 10-20 or 15-30;------but might have some fun with that warranty at the parts counter!!!!;)

 

DD 

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15 hours ago, Fred B said:

i still want a cap like your cousin, note the shade in his face, wherever you go,  you'er wearing your sun shade.  you two could be the orginal been farming long boys.        those old combines were made using already available parts, using those guide duals from a H, or M.  I am thinking the trans drive train is farmall A, including drive wheels, or was it truck parts?

Fred B, I don't know where to send you to buy a cap like James is wearing in that picture. I don't think he'd been "farming long" at the time of the photo?

The wheels on those dual wheel combines were not the same rims as the Farmall A used, but I'd bet the tires were. You're likely correct about the transmission gears, at least as they had the same shift pattern, I think? Or did they have four or five forward gears? This last half century has been a bugger on my old brain in some aspects. That's one thing that has gone away, but Anson will know, as he still has one. That rear wheel axle used the same pedestal axles and wheels as the narrow front Farmalls M & H.

The engine was green diamond Anson, and it sure wasn't set up for handiness. Checking the oil wasn't bad, but changing oil and filter wasn't an easy job. As far as I remember the 123 SP was ahead of the 125 SP. Dad and his brothers "set up" these combines for Bourke Motor & Implement Company in slack times. Since Dad had seven brothers, there were often one or two available for these setups. My wife's uncle Dow Simpson got the first new 123 SP combine to reach Lewistown. Dad and his brothers set it up.I think (?) they got the 3rd one they set up, which is the one in this photo, I believe? (Too much water under the bridge for me.) Gary ;)

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