Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

17,774 posts in this topic

The real thing in it's own time. Pic dated 1955, fellow in suit was young dealer at the time in Pullman, WA. His family also had a store ten miles away in Moscow, ID. That dealership grew and dominated this area for many years.

post-6771-0-41607200-1331655906_thumb.jp

Can anybody tell me if that might have been the first year for this series of tractors? I have the "pony" version that my dad purchased in 1956. As I recall that was supposed to be the first year for that model. Bought new with mower for $2,600.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They only made the 300 for two years then switched to the 350 which was much the same but a bit more power.

By pony version do you mean the 300 utility?

I put about 7000 hrs on our 300U.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I love my 300 Utility and as you can see I am not the only one!!!!!!!! the one is from the ranch, then mine and then Nixon.

post-39211-0-37908100-1331669992_thumb.j

post-39211-0-29811700-1331670032_thumb.j

post-39211-0-96549600-1331670075_thumb.j

post-39211-0-74137100-1331670134_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

What is the story behind the autographed picture of President Nixon?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The school with the barn and horsepowered school buses is uniqiue Loadstar----------gotta show it to my grandchildren (otherwise known as the "Rug-Rats").

This picture is a good example of the effort put forward by our forefathers to educate their children and bring the country forward----------schools and churches were one of the first order of business in developing the community. (U.S. or Canada)

Great photo of the local dealership Palouse--------those were some of the latter days of business men wearing suits/coats on a daily basis. Not long afterward---------more casual dress codes became more and more excepted.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The school with the barn and horsepowered school buses is uniqiue Loadstar----------gotta show it to my grandchildren (otherwise known as the "Rug-Rats").

This picture is a good example of the effort put forward by our forefathers to educate their children and bring the country forward----------schools and churches were one of the first order of business in developing the community. (U.S. or Canada)

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

And in many cases those country schools served double duty as a Church. Both the closest ones to me that my parents attended as schools during the week would often serve as the Church when the minister traveled out from town to conduct the service.

On an unrelated subject, here is the cover of my old Farmer's Advocate magazine from 1905. Great old magazine just packed full of up to date information for the farmer of 1905.

FarmersAdvocateCover-vi.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I was a kid when Nixon was doing his thing (1965 model), but I liked the photo just because it had a 300 in it. I don't know the story surrounding it, but I remember when I bought the tractor ($3,000 + a USED! Super "A" running) I was on line looking for information on it and just stumbled onto the picture. The Grille was on it when I bought it. Dad thinks it may have come off a TD something. It was cut down the middle and narrowed to fit the 300. It has saved my Grille a thousand times! :o

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During the quiet time here, I have been thinking about times past. Like many, during my youth a penny could sometimes take a message a long distance. You guessed it! From my youth (which lives in the bottom of a file cabinet drawer) original 1 cent post cards.

post-61526-0-83751600-1331994110_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went shopping today. I figured I better get another red tractor for this forum. I bought the big one, of course.

Ron

It's a sickness aint it Ron?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During the quiet time here, I have been thinking about times past. Like many, during my youth a penny could sometimes take a message a long distance. You guessed it! From my youth (which lives in the bottom of a file cabinet drawer) original 1 cent post cards.

Charlie, what was on the other side of the card? I've got a few of those old things too. I think this one was from my grandfather's youth. ;) Another 1 cent post card.

post-90-0-21748400-1332008444_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Ralph,

The post cards which I have are not picture post cards. They are basic plain ones with the back side totally blank for the senders written message. My guess is they were Post Office issue as the stamp is pre printed. Your Case roller card is a beauty. I would guess it was a free hand out as advertisement.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I went shopping today. I figured I better get another red tractor for this forum. I bought the big one, of course.

Ron

It's a sickness aint it Ron?

Yes it is! This thing was actually in a salvage yard and it is a very nice tractor. Worn some, of course. However, this old girl has been well maintained, it appears. Something is messed up in the transmission. All the gears are there, but when you go into 3rd, you are also still in 2nd. Boy would things bust if you let out the clutch!!! Everything seems to work except a couple lights and the tach. The air conditioner is low on freon or it would even be cooling, I think.

Ron

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like R-C has some fancy salvage yards up his way---------that's a good looking "field" tractor. Sure looks to be in better condition than that "air" tractor he pictured for us a couple of weeks ago!!!!.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Looks like R-C has some fancy salvage yards up his way---------that's a good looking "field" tractor. Sure looks to be in better condition than that "air" tractor he pictured for us a couple of weeks ago!!!!.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

It just can't hit the dirt as fast! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

During the quiet time here, I have been thinking about times past. Like many, during my youth a penny could sometimes take a message a long distance. You guessed it! From my youth (which lives in the bottom of a file cabinet drawer) original 1 cent post cards.

Charlie, what was on the other side of the card? I've got a few of those old things too. I think this one was from my grandfather's youth. ;) Another 1 cent post card.

Ralph,

Below is a postcard I happened across on Ebay last night which is currently for sale. It seems that whenever I pass through nearby Avon, NY lately, my mind has an association with Anson and Avon Ms. I am putting in a bit of info from a Livingston County history page for Anson to review. The Avon Inn shown still is operating and I have dined there a few times over the years. To anyone with any sense of smell, the sulphur springs are no secret at certain times of year, especially across the river flats on the West side of the Genesee. Road signs saying "Do Not Breathe For Next One Mile" would be appropiate.

AVON - Avon's history as a famous health resort encompasses the year 1821 through the early Twentieth Century. Though the sulphur springs were well known to the native tribes, it was after white settlement in 1789 and specifically beginning in 1821 that commercialization brought thousands of tourists to Western New York. Fourteen inns offered "the waters" as drinks and baths and presented a relaxing ambiance among the aromas emanating from the numerous mineral springs. The springs still flow in Avon today. A village park occupies the area of the Lower Springs and the racetrack, laid out in 1836 serves as a training track for standard bread horses. The Avon Inn is the last remaining hotel from that era and remains a welcoming part of the Avon community.

post-61526-0-51150200-1332074395_thumb.j

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

And the names of the cars in the picture are? There are some "experts" on this thread so I'll bet it happens, chub.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

thanks "updraft"------

There are several Avons around the country---------and it looks like your Avon has some real history behind it.

Funny-----------but we pronounce Avon as Av---on; while most others are pronounced A-von (as with the cosmetic line). We just always figured that the rest of the country was mis-pronouncing it??? :huh::o;)

We did run upon a pretty little girl up in Oxford, Mississippi in recent years that was named Avon (and pronounced it as we do); but she had no idea as to where her mom and dad came up with that name------------and had never heard of Avon, Mississippi until my nephew told her about it.

Maybe our sign should read: Please don't blink your eyes--------you will miss us!!!

We do have a school, post office, church, cotton gin and one country store (sometimes the store has gas------and sometimes they don't).

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ralph,

Below is a postcard I happened across on Ebay last night which is currently for sale. It seems that whenever I pass through nearby Avon,

Charlie, theres some real historic cards turn up on ebay and I have bought a few over the years. These Case ones are old ones that have been in the family since new as far as I know.

Can't guess as to the cars in your Avon postcard.

I've got a pic here , not a postcard, but a photo taken of our little town parade in 1955 celebrating Sask.'s 50th. That horse, carriage and occupants are all decked out in sunday best including netting on the horse. I'm guessing this was to offer some protection from the flies.

The 49 Monarch in the background catches my eye , as well as the Cockshutt 40 or 50 following the horse and carriage. The lug marks in the gravel street indicate a steel wheeled tractor had passed not long before.

post-90-0-08311400-1332095183_thumb.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Quote:

Funny-----------but we pronounce Avon as Av---on; while most others are pronounced A-von (as with the cosmetic line). We just always figured that the rest of the country was mis-pronouncing it???

We are in agreement, Anson. It is Av---on here to most folks. Strangely enough, a mile and one half down the road to the East is a place called East Av---on. where Rt. 20 and Rt. 15 intersect. We also have some cricks rather than creeks.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

All this talk about Avon's of the world, I'm surprised the old binder guy hasn't weighed in. I know there's an AVON, Montana right down the road from him. I've been through it a number of times in the past. My wife sold the cosmetic version at one point in her life so the name stood out for us. I remember she once gave me some sort of men's cologne that came in a orange glass bottle shaped like (brace yourself) a John Deere tricycle tractor. Avon seemed to sell such a wide variety of products that I used to tease her about whether they were going to get into the farm equipment business. (I even gave some thought to painting my IHC TD-14 blue with the cab pressurizer cannister on top of the cab white to look like a bottle cap.)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Palouse, Paw is out in Spokane visiting my Sister/helping her move. I anticipate them back soon if the roads are OK. We got a good old Montana spring snow going on. Seeing new calves in the fields reminds me of the fun of it all during these snows years past on the ranch ..... :rolleyes:

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Well... "Long time, no see!" Our daughterMichaelle, Farmall Kid's sister at Spokane, was hinting I'd come to help her move in the past couple of weeks. I figured I'd get to help, but we got a call that she was in the emergency room with heart problems last Monday, we chose to drop everything, throw some clothes in the car and go to Spokane. She was still in the hospital, even after four and a half hours of us on the road (snow on two of three passes). She got out of the hospital late that night. With three new prescription medications, she was doing pretty well when we left her new home last evening. One of the things, besides moving, was a new job she'd been asked to take by a large corporation, she found she had it yesterday morning and that was another huge thing removed from her heart problems.

I used to be real fast when making moving preparations. Now I'm only about half fast. I got to spend some great, great time with my oldest grandson, Maverik, who also helped his mom move. I know he showed up and worked his fanny off, to ease his granddad's obligations. I found we work so well together. We set up many things around there like the TV system, the computer system, and put together the multi piece bedframe, book shelves, etc., etc.

Maverik's mother had this "chandelier" from my grandmother Yaeger's 1927 home on the homestead near Lewistown, Montana. Farmall Kid has one similar in his shop. Maverik asked his mom for it and she gave it to him, so he asked if I'd help him put it above their dining table and I did. That ceiling is pre-stressed concrete and harder than all get out.

post-5643-0-43758800-1332297040_thumb.jp

Old business: Maverik sent me photos he took of that Nichols & Shepard Combine we all wondered if it was a "Rotary" combine, in the woods near Medical Lake, WA. Here is a picture of the feeder house of that combine, showing it was a false alarm, regarding the prospects of it being a rotary.

post-5643-0-46236500-1332297233_thumb.jp

This is a picture he took in the rear of the combine, showing the raddle straw moving system used on it, instead of straw walkers. Gary ;)

post-5643-0-58174500-1332297263_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a kid on the farm, I had to wash my hands with Boraxo soap, to get the grease off. Those cans stuck in my mind forever, with the "20 mule train" hauling Borax out of the quarry at Death Valley in California. This picture is a more mechanized version of the same thing. This is a 110hp Best steamer pulling Borax wagons out of the quarry. Gary ;)

post-5643-0-61694600-1332354744_thumb.jp

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

When I was a kid on the farm, I had to wash my hands with Boraxo soap, to get the grease off. Those cans stuck in my mind forever, with the "20 mule train" hauling Borax out of the quarry at Death Valley in California. This picture is a more mechanized version of the same thing. This is a 110hp Best steamer pulling Borax wagons out of the quarry. Gary ;)

Great picture. Wasn't there a tv show based on the 20 mule team borax? I know there was a plastic model kit years ago. My brother built one. Not sure but I think only a few of the mules survived. :D

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!


Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.


Sign In Now