Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

17,680 posts in this topic

I can only quote the situation here in Australia.

The later 15-30 (1929 and beyond) was marketted as the "McCormick-Deering 22-36" without question.

I will attempt to find photos of such.

It seemed to an "export market" convention to call the "new 15-30" a "22-36" in New Zealand, France and other markets as well.

"15-30" originally referred to 15 drawbar HP rating and 30 belt HP rating.

The 22-36 was the later tractor's HP ratings.

Regards from Michael H B)

I've had a McCormick Deering 15-30 lawn ornament tractor here for 40+ years but the numbers stamped on the i.d. plate say 22-36.

Australian advertisements for the McCormick-Deering 22-36

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullimage.asp?id=4303

http://www.wisconsinhistory.org/whi/fullimage.asp?id=23212

:)

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Michael Halsall,

Welcome aboard this thread. I've appreciated what you had sent regarding McCormick-Deering's "new" 22-36 tractor. I think Dad and his brothers used the term "15-30" pretty loosely (the same way they did "Regular" and "F-20") when I was a boy growing up on the homestead near Lewistown, MT. But I know they also liked to use the term, "22-36" as they had at least two of them. I remember the last one didn't have any tin, no radiator, no gas tank, the covers were gone from the crankcase and it didn't have any sleeves, pistons or connecting rods in it. But I remember uncle Audie walking over, sticking his red & white canvas gloved hand into one of the crankcase holes and spun the crankshaft. It was so impressive, as I was used to seeing a crankshaft in babbited bearings, that wouldn't "spin" like that 22-36 crankshaft would with those ball bearings.

Having not much else to report, I'm posting a scan I grabbed from SmokStak of a 35hp Sawyer-Massey on the cover of a Gas Tractor Age magazine circulated out of Winnepeg in 1912. This engine had a street named horsepower later of "115hp". Several companies like this (Reeves too) used a "little bigger" number than the "number one selling brand of steam engines, whose popular size added up to 110hp."

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Farmall Kid has been posting a little Afghanistan stuff lately. Maybe he became alarmed and decided he's approaching the age where some of us old guys are and realized it was time for him to start posting again? I scanned this photo he hung on the wall of his shop, beside the entry door. It is pretty self explanitory, as to the heading, but I do remember this was "the FIRST" Afghan National Army's "Air Assault" the "kid" planned with his USMC Colonel, commanding officer in Kabul. They used ANA Armor (tankers with T-72 Soviet tanks) troops airlifted by Soviet Union "HIND" (or close to that?) helicopters, flown by ANA pilots. I'm guessing Mike weighs around 175 pounds? I remember him saying that with his body armor, pack, radio gear and M-4 machine gun, he weighed 298 pounds! I'm glad 2008 is behind us, as it was the hardest year I've ever put in.

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Well I must get to work. Gary ;)

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Having not much else to report, I'm posting a scan I grabbed from SmokStak of a 35hp Sawyer-Massey on the cover of a Gas Tractor Age magazine circulated out of Winnepeg in 1912. This engine had a street named horsepower later of "115hp". Several companies like this (Reeves too) used a "little bigger" number than the "number one selling brand of steam engines, whose popular size added up to 110hp.

Well I must get to work. Gary ;)

Nice magazine cover Gary. That one hits close to home. No doubt my grandfathers and great Uncles looked through that one although by 1912 they already had their IH "Famous" engine and Aultman Taylor threshing machine.

I find it a little unusual that on a magazine titled "Gas Power Age" they would show a picture of a steam powered Sawyer Massey.

Heres a Case threshing company ad from a 1905 magazine I have saved here.

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Good poster, Ralph. It even has Gary's engine on it.

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Tubacase47,

My engine is very close to the one on Ralph's ad. Mine is a 15hp and the one on the Case catalog cover is a 20hp, but those two engines are very similar in size and many parts interchange between them. I couldn't find one with my engine headed the same direction as on Ralph's Case cover, but you can get the idea from my 15hp headed the other direction. Grandson Maverik was running the engine that day in 1998. He's 22 years old and an old married man today.

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Ralph, I don't know why that gas tractor magazine featured a huge steam engine on the cover? I do know one thing. 1912 saw a huge shift in large steam engine production. By this time, the prairie was, for all intents and purposes, broke. Maybe they were reminding us that now that those big engines broke the prairie, now it is time to till that farmland with a gas tractor?

Completely off of the subject, I took some pictures of "shoe stuff" at Silver Creek today. I have a little pair of children's C-SAW button shoes, a 1911-1912 Freeman-Patterson Shoe Company catalog and a T.C. Power & Bro. LTD. Fort Benton(the world's innermost port), Mont. button hook. Gary ;)

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Two more photos from that 1911-1912 Freeman-Patterson Shoe Company catalog of mine. This first one is just one page of men's shoes. The shoe prices in this Minneapolis company's catalog seemed to vary from $2.50 to $3.50 on the average. If you were making a dollar a day, you had to work a few days for a new pair of shoes back then too.

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This is just one page of women's shoes. Notice most are button shoes.

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Having not much else to post, this is a picture of a 30hp Alberta Special undermounted Avery at Winnepeg (likely 1912?) shown here on the Prony Brake. It appears to have a Broderick Brothers boiler instead of a Illinois Steel boiler, and notice those wide extension rims on the driver wheels. Gary ;)

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A right side view for Paw. (Just after the restoration)

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Son,

Thanks for posting that picture of our 15hp Case from back when it looked like it was "showroom fresh." Your photos are better organized than your Paw's!

I bumped into these two photos. This first picture is of a 75hp Case that Austin Monk owned at his ranch west of Kalispell, MT. I got he and Carl Mehmke together, as Carl was looking for a 36" width driver Case "Montana Special" engine and Austin was wanting to sell his. I was the engineer on this engine at the LAST Annual Mehmke Plow Day years ago. There was one more "annual plow day" the next year, but we got snowed out from plowing.

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This was us plowing at the last plowable Annual Mehmke Plow Day. The front engine was Carl's 110hp Case and in the distance you'll see the Square Turn tractor plowing, Carl's beautiful 20-70 Nichols & Shepard side mounted double, Carl's 32hp Case which I'd run every year up until this year with a bunch of Michigan, Ohio, Illinois guys there visiting and running it this year, and last but not least is the 75hp Case in the above photo that I was in charge of. Gary ;)

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This was us plowing at the last plowable Annual Mehmke Plow Day. The front engine was Carl's 110hp Case and in the distance you'll see the Square Turn tractor plowing, Carl's beautiful 20-70 Nichols & Shepard side mounted double, Carl's 32hp Case which I'd run every year up until this year with a bunch of Michigan, Ohio, Illinois guys there visiting and running it this year, and last but not least is the 75hp Case in the above photo that I was in charge of. Gary ;)

That almost looks like some "Palouse type" hills in the background Gary.

This old ad I have here is not too far off topic as it has red (trac tractor?) machinery pulling combines with what might be the Rocky Mountains in the background. They did a nice job carving up that field of grain although I see they used a binder for the centre bit. Seagrams 7 from 1947.

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Talking of binders & hills.

This is my palouse hill in ON. that we reseeded in 1965, me on the tractor & dad on the binder.

I no longer have cattle so that hill doesnt get used for pasture anymore.

Ray

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Well Ray and Ralph, for someone who has only run a binder on flat ground, you guys have got some unusual things going there with them.

Well, today, I finished piping the injector steam supply lines and finished piping the water feed lines from the injectors to the boiler. I have about four full days of piping, pretty steadily. I still have to clean out the side tanks and hook up piping from the tanks to supply water to the injectors. Fitting everything up, sometimes needing to cut another quarter inch or 5/8 inch off, to make the piping angles fit gets pretty touchy. If you notice, I call this operation "piping." My good friend John Schrock, of Osseo, Michigan taught me to say that: "You 'pipe' a steam engine and you 'plumb' a $h 1 t house." That was years ago and I've been very careful since then to use the word "piping."

This is the right side water feed to the boiler barrel from the 1" injector.

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This is the left side water feed to the boiler barrel from the 3/4" injector. Notice the TD-40!

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This is the steam supply from the top of the boiler barrel feeding the injectors and the brass Penberthy ejector atop the water tank. Also notice the two 3/4" pipes at 45 degree angles. That is the water feed from the injector, though the water heater that was intended to heat cold water being pumped in by an original steam pump. I have a steam pump that could be adapted, but I prefer injectors over steam pumps. Injectors either work or can be fixed. Steam pumps are something that you are always having to work on. And some of that work has to be done under steam. I'd rather use the injectors and play than work on a steam pump. Gary ;)

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This is the back head view from the operator's deck of both injectors piped with steam supplies and water feed to the boiler.

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I took some other photos today as well, since it has been weeks without an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm!

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It was tempting to put the battery back into my Model T and go for a drive in the unseasonably warm weather we're experiencing this March, but I have "work" to do so haven't done that yet. Gary ;)

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Talking of binders & hills.

This is my palouse hill in ON. that we reseeded in 1965, me on the tractor & dad on the binder.

I no longer have cattle so that hill doesnt get used for pasture anymore.

Ray

You must have needed a seat belt on the binder there Ray. :P

I see there is a very interesting looking auction coming up here in June. Lots of old unrestored iron there including this threshing machine.

http://www.farmauctionguide.com/cgi-bin/hodgins_new.cgi?sec=v&type=c&id=barrie&anum=1313103700

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Somebody tell me about this old plow that followed me home. (age------manufacturer??)

It's missing the point-------and also seems to missing some piece that the left handle would be fastened to

the plow shank with???? (the right handle fastens to the plow share----looks as if the left handle should mount to the shank???)

Have not found any stampings or markings on it anywhere------------do note the bolts mounting the shank to the beam are "swedge heads"-------(heated and swollen). May not be proper terminoligy------but my way of describing them. The nuts are square heads. The wooden cross bar supports in the handles are hex shaped.

Looks like it might have worn down several mules in its lifetime--------best I can tell, its rated @ 1 hp along with one raw-boned man with lots of grit and determination. Most likely this old plow spent it's days in the hill area of Mississippi.

I've got a mule collar-------now got this old plow; get it all together and start searching for those gold coins here in this good old Delta Dirt. Surely a few of them washed off down this way in the River. :rolleyes::huh:

(will post as a new thread on this forum----------also see what I can learn over on Smok Stak.) Any information/insight will be appreciated.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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another mule plow photo--------continued from prior post:

Upside down view---------note "swedged head" bolts holding shank to beam.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Somebody tell me about this old plow that followed me home. (age------manufacturer??)

Looks like it might have worn down several mules in its lifetime--------best I can tell, its rated @ 1 hp along with one raw-boned man with lots of grit and determination. Most likely this old plow spent it's days in the hill area of Mississippi.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Anson, I can't tell you much about the plow you have there except that it reminds a bit of one I have here. Mine is the original breaking plow used to break up the prairie on this century farm back in the early 1900s. Your handles are in much better shape as I think this old plow of mine has either broken or rotted them off. The wooden beam I assume is oak and has survived pretty well considering it sat outside most of it's life. I have stored it in an old log barn some 30 years ago to prevent further deterioration, but now the barn is in danger of collapsing on it. This old plow is a bit big for one guy with a weak back to try moving much but I'll try to get a picture of it if I get in the vicinity.

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And here it is, Grandpa's wood beam breaking plow. The one remaining handle hangs by a bolt. The wooden beam still seems solid. The storage space is far from ideal with melting snow on the roof dripping inside. I recall helping Dad use it once probably 35 years ago to plow out a drainage trench across the pasture so it must have been in working condition back then.

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Nothing much new here tonight. Anson, I'm envious of your mule plow (Your's too Ralph). I've had opportunities to pick up an old oak beam walking plow, but somehow, they've all passed me by.

This is a 32hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special plowing. It is a late engine with extension rims and friction disk power steering. I think it was in the Judith Basin somewhere, but I've lost track of it.

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This is a "framed" photo of an IH Tractor on a Montana Farm... our 1935 F-12 taken through the window openings of the 1925 Model TT Ford Truck.

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I also took this one of our Farmalls H & M or Annie & Toot, the Model T Coupe, Model TT Truck and 15hp Case steam engine in the shed at Silver Creek. Gary ;)

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Nice framing job there Professor.

Loadstar has a more unique plow than this plow I ran up on. Not only has he got a gauge wheel-------but looks like he had some kind of transmission adapted to the plow. I can only imagine as to how this transmission mounted to the mule or horse----(I do see the input shaft) <_<:( ---------am hoping it was twisted by the horses tail??? Whut do you think Roger??? :o;)

I did move my old plow into the farm shop to get it out of the weather----------one day I might find a point that will fit it. Best I can tell------the loose left side handle mounted to a slide piece coming off the rear of the point.

They look to be about the same age alright.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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Nice framing job there Professor.

Loadstar has a more unique plow than this plow I ran up on. Not only has he got a gauge wheel-------but looks like he had some kind of transmission adapted to the plow. I can only imagine as to how this transmission mounted to the mule or horse----(I do see the input shaft) <_<:( ---------am hoping it was twisted by the horses tail??? Whut do you think Roger??? :o;)

I did move my old plow into the farm shop to get it out of the weather----------one day I might find a point that will fit it. Best I can tell------the loose left side handle mounted to a slide piece coming off the rear of the point.

They look to be about the same age alright.

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Excellent eyesight there, Delta. I had to go back and look, and sure enough, it has a transmission!!!!!

Ron

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Thanks for the back up R-C-----------I ain't never seen a mule plow with a transmission!!!! :wacko:;)

But-----------I did get a hitching post to go with the plow. Used to see these ornaments mounted on alot of front porch steps on the older houses------where they could be used as actual hitching posts for horses. Sorry to say-----------don't see many anymore. This one appears to made out of cast alluminum---------had been cracked/busted at sometime and put back together--------looks to be in good solid condition as it is (for ornamental use). Anybody got any idea as to the age on this one---------I don't find any identification on it.

(stands about 3 ft tall)

The missus allowed me to set it up on "cowboy corner" with a small collection of cowboy/horse memorbilia by the TV---------makes for a good hat rack when I come in the door. May eventually mount it on our outside entrance deck.

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Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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and-----------while we've got the old crop duster R-C on the board (and also discussing mule/horse equipment;--------- R-C should get a real kick out of this one.

Early crop dusting by mule in the Mississippi Delta------------don't believe I have ever posted this one before----------ran up on it searching for something else today. Snapped this picture of these pictures sometime/somewhere last year (think at a museum ?).

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Most likely poisoning for boll weevil in cotton here------------don't know what chemical is being used; but calcium arsenate was a big item back in the dusting days. (tough job for man, mule and later pilots)

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

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and-----------while we've got the old crop duster R-C on the board (and also discussing mule/horse equipment;--------- R-C should get a real kick out of this one.

Early crop dusting by mule in the Mississippi Delta------------don't believe I have ever posted this one before----------ran up on it searching for something else today. Snapped this picture of these pictures sometime/somewhere last year (think at a museum ?).

post-1200-0-91195500-1331606483_thumb.jp

Most likely poisoning for boll weevil in cotton here------------don't know what chemical is being used; but calcium arsenate was a big item back in the dusting days. (tough job for man, mule and later pilots)

Delta Dirt

Avon, Ms 38723

Delta, I will pass on the mule-dusting. I don't have any photos, but I did spend many, many hours for several years spraying DDT for corn borer control back in the fifties. Front mounted sprayer on a 1941 John Deere A with the boom raised way up to get the spray into the whorl. The corn was tall enough to just barely bend under the rear axle housing on the tractor without breaking. I wore goggles and a bandana over my mouth and nose. That John Deere and I were completely white at the end of the day. Kept the cooties off, I guess. In 1956 we started using granular chemicals which were toxic, but didn't blow all over you. Much better deal. Then I went to flying the same stuff with an airplane a few years later.

Ron

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I went shopping today. I figured I better get another red tractor for this forum. I bought the big one, of course.

Ron

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Anson and Ron, you are very observant to notice the transmission in the breaking plow photo. If I had taken the photo from the other end of the plow you would also likely have noticed the Chev V8 engine. :lol: And I"m not kidding.

Those mule dusting photos are really something. Its amazing the health hazards that used to be in farming even before the mechanized era we live in now.

Following the equine theme I have this photo showing a part of country school life that some might find a little strange nowadays. Pretty well every country school yard also included a barn (stable) for the horses to be kept in after the kids rode to school. In this photo, that barn in the background no longer exists and the school is gradually disappearing with the passing years.

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