Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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Dr. Ernie,

When I was about 8, I asked Dad when I could start plowing (with a TD-40) as I'd ride with him. He had a pat answer: "When you can crank it and start it all by yourself!!!" Dad never used antifreeze in any of the farm tractors. He swore it was better to use pure spring water, which is what we drank on the Judith Basin homestead. Each fall, he had a ritual about the time it started to frost. He drained the combines, tractors, TracTracTors and whatever.

In the fall, when I was 10, Dad and Mom went to my aunt and uncle's place in Billings, while attending a convention. My only living grandparent I ever had, my maternal grandmother, stayed at the farm so there was food on the table for my brother, my uncle and myself. Well, I came home from the one room school house at Glengarry (population 8), I grabbed a cookie and a glass of milk and headed outside to play. I headed out to the shop and then back into the machine shed. There were two TD-40 TracTracTors in there. I'd watched Dad crank them up when in the field plowing. So I turned the knurled knob over on the diesel pump until the notch pointed outward, then latched the decompression lever and hooked it up. I turned on the gasoline, walked around to the other side, turned the magneto over until the impulse was set and in the notch, gave the primer five shots - after I could feel gas (as Dad had always shown me all of these things). I pulled the crank out of the leather "holder upper" and tried to turn it over. I hadn't eaten enough Wheaties or mashed potatoes or both? So I climbed up onto the front of the right track, had the crank set at "3:o'clock", grabbed the radiator and plunged downward as hard as I could. CRAP!!!! The darn thing started! Now what? I ran for the gas valve and shut it off. I didn't open the throttle, so when it kicked over onto diesel, it died. NO WATER!

For a while, I was afraid to tell Dad, but when he started it in the spring, it didn't miss or put out blue smoke and was I sure relieved. However, there was a splendid benefit that spring!!! I did get to plow, after I showed him that I could start it, ALL BY MYSELF!

Gary ;)

post-6771-1165805247_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1165805280_thumb.jpg Found a couple of photos of one of the better TD-40's we had. Taken in early fifties.

Palouse,

Thanks for posting pictures here. I love 'em. How wide were the pads on the TD-40 with the radiator problems? They sure look wide... even wider than the wide gauge Dad had used. I remember TD-40 radiators being torn down and "punched out" from time to time. I think they ground down a bandsaw blade to fit as the punch. I also remember one having the overflow tube breaking, or more likely rotting away, and the water level fell to the top of the core, only. It would run a little warm and had to be torn apart. I was always amazed that normally, when running water in a TD-40, you could remove the cap after just shutting it off and stick your hand into the water, without losing two layers of skin.

Loadstar, I noticed the L-170 (likely) and have ridden many miles in one. Was that other tractor a 300 or 350 Utility, Palouse? I had a neighbor who owned a 350 diesel and I always thought I'd have liked to own it. Does anyone remember, was that an English motor? I don't think it was IH? I don't know and can't remember, but I had scrambled eggs for breakfast! Now aren't you impressed!?!

Gary ;)

OBG--I think those were 20 inch pads on that 40. The loader tractor is a 300U (1956, gas,no power steering). It and the 1100 pickup pictured here is about all I have left from the old farming operation. Sometime I'll post a picture of my sale in 1984 showing much of my lineup.

I don't know if they ever put a thermostat in those old 35's and 40's. None of ours ever had them. If they didn't have particular problems they never ran hot. If we used them in very cold weather we often blocked part of the radiator with cardboard or something to get them to warm up. But we seldom even started them up if there was snow on the ground. Snow plowing was usually done with smaller equipment. Otherwise, like you said, you could stick your hand down that big radiator fill hole about any time. I just remember they always slobbered out under the filler gasket if you overfilled them.

That particular piece of ground did lay rather flat compared to that which surrounds it. It was a bit isolated in that it lays out over the Snake river and is about 90 % surrounded by deep canyons. The fellow that farms that farm now dumped a 1470 IH combine down the canyon a couple harvests ago. I'll try to post a picture of it sometime when I get it together. (I have to concentrate to remember breakfast)

The Truck is a '52 L-160. At a later time I owned an L-170. Both were good durable trucks. We used that one there to haul that TD-40 out to that farm, about 7 miles from the home place. Am a little self-conscious about the big water erosion rill in the forground. In those days such was just seen as a nuisance. These days we're a lot more sensitive about it.

Have been working on gather together any pictures of the past around here that you guys might find interesting. Wish I could make them bigger but know that there is a file space problem. Hang with me,I'll get 'em up there. Still trying to get the hang of how this forum thing works.post-6771-1165811167_thumb.jpg

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]post-6771-1165805280_thumb.jpg Found a couple of photos of one of the better TD-40's we had. Taken in early fifties.

Palouse

That is certainly some open country you have there in the background. Nice old L truck too. Maybe a 160,, 170?

post-6771-1165816032_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1165816111_thumb.jpg Just a couple of more recent shots to try to give you an idea of the terrain.

The truck was a '52 L-160. The year was probably closer to 1960 than middle 50's like I thought.

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Have been working on gather together any pictures of the past around here that you guys might find interesting. Wish I could make them bigger but know that there is a file space problem. Hang with me,I'll get 'em up there. Still trying to get the hang of how this forum thing works

Wow, that truck is one black beauty. Are those little side marker lights optional IH equipment? I've never seen another IH with those.

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Have been working on gather together any pictures of the past around here that you guys might find interesting. Wish I could make them bigger but know that there is a file space problem. Hang with me,I'll get 'em up there. Still trying to get the hang of how this forum thing works

Wow, that truck is one black beauty. Are those little side marker lights optional IH equipment? I've never seen another IH with those.

No, I put on the cab lights, which are just off the shelf generic marker lights. The little things on the fenders are only paste on reflectors that I found someplace. The color is actually a metallic emerald green, but it doesn't show up in that photo. It was billed as a "heavy duty half ton" when I bought it new in June of 1966. It's had a good life, serving more as my personal vehicle than as farm pickup. It's got the 304 in it with a four speed on the floor stick. It hauled a camper and towed another every summer, is rigged up to haul as much as 100 gallons of gas. One auxillary 20 gal tank under left side, besides regular on right. Then two 30 gal custom built tanks tucked in ahead of the wheel wells in the bed so a slide in camper would fit by them. That was a result of the first "energy crisis" when we'd be traveling and many rural gas stations simply weren't open on Sindays. It doesn't get a lot of miles these days and I keep it shedded. But it still wants to rust out in places. I don't think they did the rust preventative dipping process in manufacture that they do now.

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Palouse,

It is sure interesting to hear from you here. I don't know if the kids appreciate us seniors using up screen space here or not, but I guess they don't have to open our stuff up, if it offends them?

Our place participated in two auction sales over the years. I think I can find my sale bills and will try to get them scanned as well. I'm still learning how this forum works too. I know more about computers and scanning than many of my peers, but working around a school district, as I now do, I see the young people who do the stuff and don't even think about what they are doing. I put everything I have into this and sometimes it isn't enough.

I have no more IH trucks or pickups. My 1100 4X4 was much like yours... 304 & four speed... and I think it is on this thread, as well as down in the truck forum. I ended up with a Farmall H and the one TD-40. I have two Farmall F-14s, but I've picked them up since the farm.

Palouse,

I'm putting another picture of my Farmall H here. This old 1939 H was on the farm before me; i.e., I can't remember when it wasn't there. She was the 181st one built. I had it on a buzz saw to cut wood for mu Case steam engine at one of our local shows here near Kalispell.

I posted some pictures down in the Construction forum, but I think it wouldn't hurt to have a few of them here too? The first one shows a TD-18A pulling a 620 JD tool bar, IH #5 Rod weeders and harrows.

My old TD-18A 181 series of 1955 with Bucyrus Erie hydraulic dozer.

Our oldest TD-40, with the right side brake pedals, a 1933 model... and the 1953 TD-18A.

Gary

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..Well, OBG and Paulose...seniors you may be, but I for one certainly enjoy this post.....those old pictures of TD40's are really something :):) ...and as a long time admirer and small time collector of Charlie Russell, it was very interesting to read of the great man, riding through your Grandpa's place etc in Montana....

Indeed, thankyou for the contributions....here and the construction site

Mike

post-157-1165858775_thumb.jpg

...here is an old, poor quality photo :(:( of my Dad's TD40...taken in 1938...he logged for a living with this unit untill WW2 spoiled the party....

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Keep'um coming. I could look at this stuff all day. I'm not but 48 years old and have never lived anywhere other than the farm from which I'm typing this. We had a TD-9 with a Bucyrus blade when I was a little kid and I thought that was the biggest crawler made back then. Back then I could not ever imagine that anyone could farm with track tractors, pretty much everything here is rowcrop, tobacco, sweet potatos, cotton, peanuts, soybeans, corn and and a little wheat. I should thank all of you guys out in the high up cold country for planting and harvesting those large wheat crops. If it wern't for you and your familys then MaMa couldn't have put any biscuits on the table.............And I do love me a hot, greasy, homemade biscuit with a dab of Cow Salve butter and some home grown Christmas time country ham packed inside. I'm going to make us a pan of biscuits while ya'll post some more pictures!!!

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. The color is actually a metallic emerald green, but it doesn't show up in that photo. It was billed as a "heavy duty half ton" when I bought it new in June of 1966. It's had a good life, serving more as my personal vehicle than as farm pickup. It's got the 304 in it with a four speed on the floor stick. It hauled a camper and towed another every summer, is rigged up to haul as much as 100 gallons of gas.

My mistake, thought it was black but then its not the first time I've had trouble with colours of vehicles. Just curious how that 304 did on gas mileage. I've heard a lot about IH pickups being gas guzzlers but the 304 automatic in the 2 wd Scout II that I drove for a while I did not consider bad at all. Highway driving would get about 17 to 18 average.

And I do enjoy the posts that you "seniors" have been doing on this forum lately. Keep it going. There are a lot of older folks that have a wealth of information and memories that we might never get to share since they have no interest or knowledge of computers and the net.

And I hope the term "senior" doesn't offend you guys since I dont' really know your ages. I'm getting up there myself at 53.

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..Well, OBG and Paulose...seniors you may be, but I for one certainly enjoy this post.....those old pictures of TD40's are really something :):) ...and as a long time admirer and small time collector of Charlie Russell, it was very interesting to read of the great man, riding through your Grandpa's place etc in Montana....

Indeed, thankyou for the contributions....here and the construction site

Mike

post-157-1165858775_thumb.jpg

...here is an old, poor quality photo :(:( of my Dad's TD40...taken in 1938...he logged for a living with this unit untill WW2 spoiled the party....

Mike,

You are certainly welcome for my contributions and I'd bet Palouse feels the same. It is great to have a place to do this!

When Charlie was a cowboy above Utica, in the Little Belt Mountains, for Jake Hoover, Grandpa's 1881 homestead was on the way to old Cottonwood. Since my grandpa died in 1920, I'd have given a couple of my now useless appendages to visit with him about subjects like this. For example Grandpa had raised and cut (with a wooden wheel McCormick binder [from the Lehman Mercantile - with stores in Utica and Cottonwood]) 400 bushels of grain for the winter of 1886-87, when Charlie painted the "Last of the 5000" photo of the near death cow, surrounded by coyotes. That is the worst winter on record in Montana. Freezing rain covered the grass, the cowboys had been using for open winter feed, which now cut cow's feet and noses. It got down to 60 below and stayed there for weeks, and as one old timer said, "A tree would explode with one chop of an axe at that temperature." Did grandpa and Charlie ever visit about that winter? I don't know. From what I've gathered, "Charlie never met a stranger!" and he'd stop and visit with just about anyone.

I'm including a picture of a wooden wheel McCormick binder. Somewhere I have a picture from Rollag, that shows the wooden drive wheel too. This was an 1881 binder and Grandpa's was bought in 1883, but there couldn't have been a heck of a lot of difference?

Mike, Palouse, or anyone... I have a question. If you go back through our TD-40 pictures, our old 1933 '40 is the only one I see without "rock guards" on the drive sprockets. We had two that had plain sprockets and two that had rock guard type. I KNOW that both of our TD-40s with the rock guards, the drive sprockets were replaced. I've looked through 150 Years of IHC and notice some have the rock guards. My question... Were they standard equipment or were they an extra cost option? I've toyed with grinding the five or six welds that hold the rock guard disk onto the drive sprocket on mine, before I paint it gray. I think they look "older", but there is really nothing wrong with the rock guards. I just wanted to bounce this off of you all.

Retento,

You're making me hungry. My wife and I consider anything like our whole wheat bread, or crackers, as "a Vehicle" to consume that "cow salve butter" you speak of!

Loadstar,

I am never offended at being called "senior" any longer. I used to, but the older I get and as I bury friends, I'm the fortunate and blessed one!

Gary

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OBG, now at 7.23 am on a beautifull NZ morning..I should be heading to the welding shop...but what the heck!!!

..those stone gaurds on the 40 sprockets....I always imagined them to be retro fitted in NZ...but as I saw more and more pictures of the old tractors...and gathered more information..it became obvious that all but one...that I have seen...(now two, with yours OBG!!!)...have had identical gaurds fitted over the sprokets....funny, because the 35's that I have seen in NZ..and in the US, have never had them...nor of course the many T20's .....

We have have "TD40 Jake " from Australia...who is collecting data from the Aust/NZ tractractors...we should get his observations on this matter, also.....he has quite a few tractors on his data base....

We have a dozen or more, that I am aware of, TD40's in the South Island .....also a similair amount of 35's

..not enough to make specific observations.......interesting though :):)

Mike

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..Well, OBG and Paulose...seniors you may be, but I for one certainly enjoy this post.....those old pictures of TD40's are really something :):) ...and as a long time admirer and small time collector of Charlie Russell, it was very interesting to read of the great man, riding through your Grandpa's place etc in Montana....

Indeed, thankyou for the contributions....here and the construction site

Mike

post-157-1165858775_thumb.jpg

...here is an old, poor quality photo :(:( of my Dad's TD40...taken in 1938...he logged for a living with this unit untill WW2 spoiled the party....

Mike,

You are certainly welcome for my contributions and I'd bet Palouse feels the same. It is great to have a place to do this!

When Charlie was a cowboy above Utica, in the Little Belt Mountains, for Jake Hoover, Grandpa's 1881 homestead was on the way to old Cottonwood. Since my grandpa died in 1920, I'd have given a couple of my now useless appendages to visit with him about subjects like this. For example Grandpa had raised and cut (with a wooden wheel McCormick binder [from the Lehman Mercantile - with stores in Utica and Cottonwood]) 400 bushels of grain for the winter of 1886-87, when Charlie painted the "Last of the 5000" photo of the near death cow, surrounded by coyotes. That is the worst winter on record in Montana. Freezing rain covered the grass, the cowboys had been using for open winter feed, which now cut cow's feet and noses. It got down to 60 below and stayed there for weeks, and as one old timer said, "A tree would explode with one chop of an axe at that temperature." Did grandpa and Charlie ever visit about that winter? I don't know. From what I've gathered, "Charlie never met a stranger!" and he'd stop and visit with just about anyone.

I'm including a picture of a wooden wheel McCormick binder. Somewhere I have a picture from Rollag, that shows the wooden drive wheel too. This was an 1881 binder and Grandpa's was bought in 1883, but there couldn't have been a heck of a lot of difference?

Mike, Palouse, or anyone... I have a question. If you go back through our TD-40 pictures, our old 1933 '40 is the only one I see without "rock guards" on the drive sprockets. We had two that had plain sprockets and two that had rock guard type. I KNOW that both of our TD-40s with the rock guards, the drive sprockets were replaced. I've looked through 150 Years of IHC and notice some have the rock guards. My question... Were they standard equipment or were they an extra cost option? I've toyed with grinding the five or six welds that hold the rock guard disk onto the drive sprocket on mine, before I paint it gray. I think they look "older", but there is really nothing wrong with the rock guards. I just wanted to bounce this off of you all.

Retento,

You're making me hungry. My wife and I consider anything like our whole wheat bread, or crackers, as "a Vehicle" to consume that "cow salve butter" you speak of!

Loadstar,

I am never offended at being called "senior" any longer. I used to, but the older I get and as I bury friends, I'm the fortunate and blessed one!

Gary

OBG...I never really got into the steam era of farming, although when I was a kid they had wonderful old time threshing bees around here, part of the Western Steam Fiends association. That all ended before the 60's when the local collector died and there just wasn't the energy to carry on. I'll try to remember to post some pics of that event later on.

The attached steam engine actually spent many years half buried in a swampy area behind my barn as I was growing up. Sometime in the 70's a friend convinced me to donate it to a WSU class in "power". They had dreams of resurrecting it, but immediately ran into problems like the boiler inspecter and the simple fact that it was just too far gone for their abilities. They in turn (with my permission) turned it over to the vo-ag kids at Pullman High School, who eventually made it into this monument out front of the then new Pullman High School. As time and funds allowed, it started out painted red and black, but then the artistic minded must have prevailed and it got it's present paint job.

An elderly uncle told me that my granddad never actually ran this engine, that it came with a land acquisition many years before my time. There was a threshing machine with it, but when I sold out of farming the land it was setting on had been sold and it had to be hauled off. That's the way it goes. I understand that a lot of these old engines were scrapped during the war effort.

Anyway OBG, thought you might enjoy this. By the way, I carry the "senior" badge with honor and pride, although it did take some getting used to at first. I've been receiving AARP stuff since I was 50, and I know exactly who offers senior discounts and who doesn't.post-6771-1165863602_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1165863602_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1165863602_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1165863635_thumb.jpg

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Mike,

I appreciate your input into the stone guard situation. The more I think about it, they were likely always an option? The sprockets on a plain one would sure be vulnerable in the Judith Basin, in certain fields at least. Castings appear like a big old rock could sure tear things up?

Palouse,

I missed out on the steam era myself, but my dad was right in the middle of it and his apples didn't fall far from the tree. The steam show you speak of has to be that of Chris Busch? He was a big name back then. I had a friend in Pennsylvania who hauled a bunch of Chris' engines to the east coast. They are some dandy engines.

I started running our 20hp Nichols & Shepard steam engine in the fall of 1954. I'm going to put a couple of pictures of it here, since I found two pictures last night and they show the only pictures I have of my T-20, or at least that I can find. I bought the T-20 for $50 with a bad rod bearing. It was a fun little TracTracTor for a kid. The smaller steam engine was our 16hp Russell. (I have a 16hp lawn & garden tractor. This Russell would pull a couple of dozen of them backward, I'd bet.)

The second is a side view and a picture I'd carried in my billfold for quite some time.

The third color photo is of a friend's 1953 R-160 truck backed under a 22" McCormick-Deering threshing machine that now belongs to my son. That is my 15hp Case steam engine powering the thresher.

Gary

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In the fourth (the darn thing got flipped on me, somehow... me and computers?) photo, I have no idea who owned the little Farmall Cub; like I first drove at age 6 and mowed hay with at 9, but it gives me the excuse of placing this photo here. My friend Kevin M. Small took this picture of the NTA show at Wauseon, Ohio in 1994 at their 50th Anniversary. I am on the 32hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special steam engine at right, steering. I have memories of playing on this engine as early as at least age 3. It was the engine my dad and his brothers plowed with from 1920 through 1938, when it became too wet to farm with these big engines. Moisture hadn't been a hinderance, much, during the early part of "the Dirty Thirties." Dad traded the engine in 1954, for another smaller engine and eventually this engine sold and went to Ohio. It was owned at the time of this photo, by the late Marvin Brodbeck, president of the NTA at that time. This was the first time I'd ever seen this engine running and I enjoyed spending a couple of days on it, despite the 5" of rain the show had dumped on it. The Reeves and the Cub in the picture were "step sisters by marriage." Emerson-Brantingham bought Reeves & Company and took possession on January 1, 1912. Emerson-Brantingham was losing their behinds when they more or less dropped Reeves about 1922 or 23. The Reeves factory at Columbus, Indiana burned in 1925. In 1926 (I'm pretty sure), J.I. Case bought portions of what remained of Emerson-Brantingham, mainly haying and cultivating equiment. Case did not get the Reeves portion of E-B. You all know the history of Tenneco getting J.I Case & International Harvester...hence, the "step sisters by marriage."

The third photo is of my son Mike, at Helena, Montana, several years ago. My cousin gave me this 1941 Farmall M and I wouldn't have bothered picking it up, if Mike hadn't wanted it. It wasn't much. He tore it apart in his shop and rebuilt it. He uses it to plow, grade roads and take pleasure trips for his little son Jacob, who really likes tractors.

The second is a picture of my 1939 Farmall H belted to a friend's buzz saw at one of our NWAPA shows near Columbia Falls about ten years ago. She is #FBH681 or the 181st Farmall H built.

This first photo is of my son Mike with his 300 Utility and IH loader after he got it about three years ago. He keeps it in town in the winter and at his place on Silver Creek in the summer. It looks a little nicer now than it did when he got it, but it was and is a great little tractor.

Gary

I wasn't sure I could get this photo here or not, but it is of my son Mike on the Farmall M I'd given him about ten years ago. He took the front grill off with a spud bar, as it was mangled. My (now 18 year old) grandson, Maverik Bursch, is leaning against the rear tire.

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. The color is actually a metallic emerald green, but it doesn't show up in that photo. It was billed as a "heavy duty half ton" when I bought it new in June of 1966. It's had a good life, serving more as my personal vehicle than as farm pickup. It's got the 304 in it with a four speed on the floor stick. It hauled a camper and towed another every summer, is rigged up to haul as much as 100 gallons of gas.

My mistake, thought it was black but then its not the first time I've had trouble with colours of vehicles. Just curious how that 304 did on gas mileage. I've heard a lot about IH pickups being gas guzzlers but the 304 automatic in the 2 wd Scout II that I drove for a while I did not consider bad at all. Highway driving would get about 17 to 18 average.

And I do enjoy the posts that you "seniors" have been doing on this forum lately. Keep it going. There are a lot of older folks that have a wealth of information and memories that we might never get to share since they have no interest or knowledge of computers and the net.

And I hope the term "senior" doesn't offend you guys since I dont' really know your ages. I'm getting up there myself at 53.

Loadstar,

In answer to your question, I don't suppose the 1100 pickup ever set any MPG records, but I was always satisfied with it. Maybe 13-18 was typical, depending on load and condition at the time. I just ended up installing a factory rebuilt carb on it last summer because it was running so crappy. I was going to rebuild it myself (a new experience for me) until I discovered that those little venturie things sticking out into the throats of the two barrel were all but incinerated. Apparently the result of a carb fire at some point. Funny thing was that I'm the only one who ever goes near the thing and I can only remember that sort of thing happening at least six years or so back. (Goofed up trying to prime it to start it in cold weather) I've used it a lot since then and it ran well enough. But it idled rough and seemed to be partly flooded much of the time. I only drive it on short trips, so never really got a bead on gas consumption. It's not good in the snow so it sets in the shed most of the winter months.

I drove a '72 Scout II for about ten years. Got it cheap with very low miles and proceded to put over 100K on it myself. It was the 4th one I looked at that didn't have the rear door trying to rust out, among other places. Is that a problem with that model? I once did a 360 with it coming down the Montana side of Lookout Pass on I-90 (OBG should know where that's at). Came out of it unscathed but took me a long time to get over it. Hit frost at high noon on one of those bridges a mile or so down from the summit. Otherwise dry pavement around Thanksgiving time. Didn't have a clue, thought I was a dead man.

It had the 345 with an automatic. Was that kind of bronz color that seemed popular that year. Solid enough rig but weathered and dull looking. Not pretty like yours. I saw one or two around that were all cherried out and always thought they looked nice. Mine was a long ways away from that. Had a lot of trouble with that big electrical plug arrangement that goes through the firewall. Parts of it would corrode and heat, then cause all sorts of problems. Finally ended up bypassing the plug with a jumper on the main circuit.

As I told OBG, I glory in my "senior" status and will lord over you "youngsters" any old time. Don't worry about it, OK?

. The color is actually a metallic emerald green, but it doesn't show up in that photo. It was billed as a "heavy duty half ton" when I bought it new in June of 1966. It's had a good life, serving more as my personal vehicle than as farm pickup. It's got the 304 in it with a four speed on the floor stick. It hauled a camper and towed another every summer, is rigged up to haul as much as 100 gallons of gas.

My mistake, thought it was black but then its not the first time I've had trouble with colours of vehicles. Just curious how that 304 did on gas mileage. I've heard a lot about IH pickups being gas guzzlers but the 304 automatic in the 2 wd Scout II that I drove for a while I did not consider bad at all. Highway driving would get about 17 to 18 average.

And I do enjoy the posts that you "seniors" have been doing on this forum lately. Keep it going. There are a lot of older folks that have a wealth of information and memories that we might never get to share since they have no interest or knowledge of computers and the net.

And I hope the term "senior" doesn't offend you guys since I dont' really know your ages. I'm getting up there myself at 53.

Loadstar,

In answer to your question, I don't suppose the 1100 pickup ever set any MPG records, but I was always satisfied with it. Maybe 13-18 was typical, depending on load and condition at the time. I just ended up installing a factory rebuilt carb on it last summer because it was running so crappy. I was going to rebuild it myself (a new experience for me) until I discovered that those little venturie things sticking out into the throats of the two barrel were all but incinerated. Apparently the result of a carb fire at some point. Funny thing was that I'm the only one who ever goes near the thing and I can only remember that sort of thing happening at least six years or so back. (Goofed up trying to prime it to start it in cold weather) I've used it a lot since then and it ran well enough. But it idled rough and seemed to be partly flooded much of the time. I only drive it on short trips, so never really got a bead on gas consumption. It's not good in the snow so it sets in the shed most of the winter months.

I drove a '72 Scout II for about ten years. Got it cheap with very low miles and proceded to put over 100K on it myself. It was the 4th one I looked at that didn't have the rear door trying to rust out, among other places. Is that a problem with that model? I once did a 360 with it coming down the Montana side of Lookout Pass on I-90 (OBG should know where that's at). Came out of it unscathed but took me a long time to get over it. Hit frost at high noon on one of those bridges a mile or so down from the summit. Otherwise dry pavement around Thanksgiving time. Didn't have a clue, thought I was a dead man.

It had the 345 with an automatic. Was that kind of bronz color that seemed popular that year. Solid enough rig but weathered and dull looking. Not pretty like yours. I saw one or two around that were all cherried out and always thought they looked nice. Mine was a long ways away from that. Had a lot of trouble with that big electrical plug arrangement that goes through the firewall. Parts of it would corrode and heat, then cause all sorts of problems. Finally ended up bypassing the plug with a jumper on the main circuit.

As I told OBG, I glory in my "senior" status and will lord over you "youngsters" any old time. Don't worry about it, OK?

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Mike,

I appreciate your input into the stone guard situation. The more I think about it, they were likely always an option? The sprockets on a plain one would sure be vulnerable in the Judith Basin, in certain fields at least. Castings appear like a big old rock could sure tear things up?

Palouse,

I missed out on the steam era myself, but my dad was right in the middle of it and his apples didn't fall far from the tree. The steam show you speak of has to be that of Chris Busch? He was a big name back then. I had a friend in Pennsylvania who hauled a bunch of Chris' engines to the east coast. They are some dandy engines.

I started running our 20hp Nichols & Shepard steam engine in the fall of 1954. I'm going to put a couple of pictures of it here, since I found two pictures last night and they show the only pictures I have of my T-20, or at least that I can find. I bought the T-20 for $50 with a bad rod bearing. It was a fun little TracTracTor for a kid. The smaller steam engine was our 16hp Russell. (I have a 16hp lawn & garden tractor. This Russell would pull a couple of dozen of them backward, I'd bet.)

The second is a side view and a picture I'd carried in my billfold for quite some time.

The third color photo is of a friend's 1953 R-160 truck backed under a 22" McCormick-Deering threshing machine that now belongs to my son. That is my 15hp Case steam engine powering the thresher.

Gary

OBG...Glad to hear Chris Busch was known so widely. I'm attaching a pic of one of his threshing bees, probably around 1955 (try to spot the newest cars). Still a little spooked by this forum technology. Didn't mean to send so many copies of the same steam engine pics...Palouse

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OBG...bit more on those stone gaurds afixed to the TD40 sprockets.....you suggested that the "gaurdless" model was a very early one...after realising that virtually all TD40's had this fixture....and having a few T20's...and other crawlers, I believe those gaurds would offer a degree of strength to the sprocket , by way of reducing lateral flex.....

Consider the torque from that old engine...going through that sprocket that unlike the later models, had no outer bearing to stop any torsional "flex"....there must be tremendous forces present when winching and driving off one sprocket etc.....and the sprockets certainly do not grow in size from the T20 to the 40..relative to overall weight and HP....

Look at todays excavators...and the huge final drive with the planetary gear setup.....relative to the machine size...

Could be something in that thought..... :):)

Mike

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Mike,

I think you are on the right track with the stone guards. One big difference I always noticed in the principle of my TD-18s was the outboard bearing. There has to be some terrible torque on the inner end of that sprocket's shaft of a TD-40, or smaller sizes. And flexing, I think I'll just leave it where it is. If I ever want to see what the spoked ones look like, I can just climb underneath and look above the undercarriage at the back side of the sprocket.

I posted some pictures of mine and a couple were down in the Construction forum. The third one shows my newphew on the old TD-40 Dad had with a Holt dozer. The second one is of me and Austin Monk plowing with my TD-40 about a dozen years ago. I was braking with 6 bottoms and pulling in 3rd gear, but admit it was nice black dirt. I like the matchbook I have and posted, showing a TD-18, KB-7 and Farmall M.

Gary ;)

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It appears the sprocket guard was an IH upgrade item. It could also be retro fitted to the earlir machines.

mike

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Magic Mikey,

Thanks for your detective work. It is highly appreciated!

Palouse,

I have a picture of a situation at the Mehmke Farm, plowing with a 30hp undermounted Avery steam engine and a 4300 IH in the early 1960s.

I will attempt to also post a picture of the late Walter Mehmke with the 32hp Case he broke his farm with in the 1920s.

Gary

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Mike,

I think you are on the right track with the stone guards. One big difference I always noticed in the principle of my TD-18s was the outboard bearing. There has to be some terrible torque on the inner end of that sprocket's shaft of a TD-40, or smaller sizes. And flexing, I think I'll just leave it where it is. If I ever want to see what the spoked ones look like, I can just climb underneath and look above the undercarriage at the back side of the sprocket.

I posted some pictures of mine and a couple were down in the Construction forum. The third one shows my newphew on the old TD-40 Dad had with a Holt dozer. The second one is of me and Austin Monk plowing with my TD-40 about a dozen years ago. I was braking with 6 bottoms and pulling in 3rd gear, but admit it was nice black dirt. I like the matchbook I have and posted, showing a TD-18, KB-7 and Farmall M.

Gary ;)

OBG...I remember my dad saying that TD-40's (and 35's for that matter) didn't make good dozer tractors, or any other tasks where there was a lot of shock load, for a couple of reasons. The first was that the track frames were mounted differently, on a separate pivot shaft with wishbones that just weren't up to absorbing the shock of a dozer blade pushing against them. I know there were tractors running around here that were known to have sprung wishbones so that the track frames splayed outward. They didn't necessarily get that way from having dozers, which few around here did, but just from neglect and abusive operation. We kids used to figure that they would cause the ground to wrinkle up underneath as they passed over it. The second reason for avoiding shock loads was because of the relatively high speed design of the steering clutches, that jerking under load would destroy them in time. It was thought that Caterpillar and other makes were built more for this kind of use.

On the other hand, my dad loved the old 40's particularly because they had a long five roller track frame and the drive sprocket was raised so that it didn't pound on the ground all day like a D-4 or TD-9. As he got older he used to talk about that. (All he wanted then was a good ol' 40 with decent tracks and electric start.)

I know that when they took off the old front caster wheel (for horses mostly) from the pull combines and gave them a straight tongue resting on the tractor hitch, D-4 owners often concocted a big coil spring arrangement there to try to absorb the heavy shaking throughout the combine from those drive sprockets. There were pros and cons to all this.

Sometimes when pulling a combine up a steeper grade the TD-40 would rear up a bit, setting back on it's sprocket, thereby decreasing the amount of track contacting the ground. Often that would cause it to dig in and spin out and you would end up having to back that whole outfit back down off the hill, climbing over the piles of dirt you had churned up on the way up. This would most likely occur during the hottest part of the afternoon when you already had a straw and chaff storm blowing directly at you from the tail end of the combine.

Pic from around 1951. Old galvanized IH model 51 combine heading out to the other place to start harvest. That machine started out with steel wheels, probably about 1940 vintage. We ran it for around 20 years, through the war years.post-6771-1165906586_thumb.jpg

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Mike Newman and Magic Mikey B) you got me sleeping :blush: I dont come to the coffee shop often ;)

Anyway with the TD-40 rear sprockets with the renforcing disc's. Up to 1934 #1813 diesels did not have them from new, only open sprockets same as the gas T-40 and T-20. From 1934 #TCC2501 to 1937 #4468 the disc sprockets was a option. From #TCC4469 1937 to the end #TCC9565 1939 all diesels had them. Only know of 1 with a open rear sprocket out of about 25 here. Upgrades and repairs may have seen some fitted with the stronger sprockets later on :unsure:

As for the overcenter hand clutch and the LH brake on the LH side that was standard from 1936 #5817 on, dont know when it became a option :unsure: have to do a bit more digging on that one :o think that most diesels before that had them fitted except for the very early ones

OBG B) please keep the stories and the photos coming :):):) love to hear about farming in that part of the country B)

Thanks from Jake

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Aussie TD-40,

Thank you so much for you additional digging for this old wondering mind. I feel better about leaving them on my TD-40 now. It had the open spokes originally, but were replaced in 1950, when my uncle went through everything on this one, from the crank to the pto shaft. I didn't want it to look "too new" after painting it gray again. As long as they could be had either way, that settles it for me.

Palouse,

Thanks for sending along the combine photo. I have quite a few of different brands, with the front pivot wheel. We had two we used, of the old Advance-Rumelys with 20' headers when I was a kid. I hear what you say about the use of a TD-40 with a dozer. The one I just pictured last night, with the Holt dozer never ever broke a wishbone, to my knowledge, or at least while we had it. Our wide gauge industrial International had a broken wishbone when Dad and his brothers bought it, during WWII. It had been used to build B-17 runways at Lewistown, Montana during WWII. I'm not sure of its age, but I think it was a 1939 or 40 model? It pulled a scraper there and you'll see the winch on it in the photos. Being "industrial, it had a belly pan, originally had a massive steel grille - with crank extension and has a swiveling hook up front. It is the middle TD-40, in the stuck in Beaver Creek photo I took in 1950.

Gary

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Palouse,

I never know in which order these pictures will come up when I hit "ADD REPLY" and I guess that is the perils of being old and lacking knowledge about all the technology that is there and I don't understand. As you might guess, I'm an analog guy trapped here in a digital world.

This shows an IH D-30 truck unloading from one of the Advance Rumely combines, being pulled up the hill by a TD-9. We had hills and they'd sure make black smoke from a TracTracTor, but I'd have to concede, we don't come close to the hills you farmed around.

The other picture shows my uncle Audie pulling a haystack with an old TD-9 we had. My dad much preferred a TD-40 over that TD-9... Any day.

Gary ;)

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This is a picture of the 4568 and 1256 seeding years ago, and I'm gracing the photo. My lovely wife would say, "You should have had clean jeans on."

Gary ;)

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Thats a rig I'd like to run!

Tony

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