Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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I REALLY like that 403 hillside. Thats truly spectacular!

Tony

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Gary, those "plows" or flexalls you are hooked onto there sure remind me of what we used to call "tillers" here in Sask. Usually in 4, 6, 8, or in some cases 10 foot widths. No flex there either. By the sixties most tillers were sidelined by the newer improved diskers which had lots of flexibility and made a fairly decent seeding implement too. Being more flexible they pulled easier than the old tillers did. IH made their Diskall 100 I believe and Massey #36 diskers were common around here. The diskers were in 12, 15 , and 18 foot widths. Dual and triple hookups were popular as tractor size increased.

Not sure what model the tiller is behind this Co-op tractor that my Uncle was driving back in the mid 1940s but it was a typical summerfallow scene from the time.

Coopfrontview.jpg

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Gary, those "plows" or flexalls you are hooked onto there sure remind me of what we used to call "tillers" here in Sask. Usually in 4, 6, 8, or in some cases 10 foot widths. No flex there either. By the sixties most tillers were sidelined by the newer improved diskers which had lots of flexibility and made a fairly decent seeding implement too. Being more flexible they pulled easier than the old tillers did. IH made their Diskall 100 I believe and Massey #36 diskers were common around here. The diskers were in 12, 15 , and 18 foot widths. Dual and triple hookups were popular as tractor size increased.

Not sure what model the tiller is behind this Co-op tractor that my Uncle was driving back in the mid 1940s but it was a typical summerfallow scene from the time.

Coopfrontview.jpg

Loadstar,

What you have shown behind the Co-op is much like what I had on the rear, I think. Mine had rubber tires, but my father in-law had one just like it and it had steel wheels. This one cut a, 8' swath, as I remember? They had an oilbath lift, not open like the older ones my dad had. The 110 Flexall was nearly identical to the 100, except the 110 was a rigid set of disks. I think my 110 cut about 12'?

Gary, those "plows" or flexalls you are hooked onto there sure remind me of what we used to call "tillers" here in Sask. Usually in 4, 6, 8, or in some cases 10 foot widths. No flex there either. By the sixties most tillers were sidelined by the newer improved diskers which had lots of flexibility and made a fairly decent seeding implement too. Being more flexible they pulled easier than the old tillers did. IH made their Diskall 100 I believe and Massey #36 diskers were common around here. The diskers were in 12, 15 , and 18 foot widths. Dual and triple hookups were popular as tractor size increased.

Not sure what model the tiller is behind this Co-op tractor that my Uncle was driving back in the mid 1940s but it was a typical summerfallow scene from the time.

Coopfrontview.jpg

Loadstar,

What you have shown behind the Co-op is much like what I had on the rear, I think. Mine had rubber tires, but my father in-law had one just like it and it had steel wheels. This one cut a, 8' swath, as I remember? They had an oilbath lift, not open like the older ones my dad had. The 110 Flexall was nearly identical to the 100, except the 110 was a rigid set of disks. I think my 110 cut about 12'?

Gary ;)

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Loadstar,

It should be okay to post a picture of my friend Dan Tombrink's Coop #1, as it is setting beside his ID-6 IH. Dan has a spectacular collection of odball IH tractors near me here at Columbia Falls, Montana. Dan's brother Dick took this picture.

Gary ;)

post-5643-1165538147_thumb.jpg

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You know Dan eh? Dad hualed out a co-op #1 out to him a couple of yeas ago and C,C and I stayed a their house a couple of nights also. Do you also know Ben in columbia falls, he has a salvage yard. Small world EH?

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You know Dan eh? Dad hualed out a co-op #1 out to him a couple of yeas ago and C,C and I stayed a their house a couple of nights also. Do you also know Ben in columbia falls, he has a salvage yard. Small world EH?

Dr. Ernie,

When I moved over here 25 years ago, Carl Mehmke said, "You will have to stop and introduce yourself to Joe Tombrink. He lives just below the hill, west of Columbia Falls." I did and became friends with Joe and his sons Dan & later Dick, who came over that summer to fire up his 15hp Case steamer, which he left it in Joe's shed.

Then I learned about Dick & Dan's "Aunt Katherine" at Great Falls. When she passed away, Dan remarked that she was adopted by a man by the name of Regli, after Regli married her mother. My grandmother Yaeger's maiden name was also Regli. Katherine's step dad and my grandmother both came to America from Andermatt, Switzerland and both lived on Beaver Creek west of Lewistown. Columbus and Grandma were first cousins. Needless to say that Dan and I call each other "Cuz"! I've never heard of anyone with the name Regli, who wasn't from that tiny high Alpine town in CH.

I know some of the parts on Dan's Coop are part of what you brought out, if not most of it. I know he had two to build one. I know he had most of one and needed another better transmission, beside some other parts to complete what he was working on. If he only had one Coop when you brought yours, then that was the starting point. If he already had one, he used the one you brought for parts. I don't think I know Ben at Columbia Falls, however. But... I'm darn good at faces and P Poor at names.

Gary ;)

Yes is is a very small world!

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Old binder guy, you sure have un earthed some real nice old pictures. Although I'am younger than some of the guys on this forum, just nudging 40! I still find the old time pictures very interesting. Some of our family are still farming, I wish we had taken more pictures back then , even in my lifetime.

I liked the story about hooking up in the rail road track plowing snow, liked the line about the young boy shouting out.

I spent many hours riding on tractors with my grandad and uncles when I was still to young to reach the pedals. Just wonder looking back how I stuck it being shook around .

Alex.

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Old binder guy, you sure have un earthed some real nice old pictures. Although I'am younger than some of the guys on this forum, just nudging 40! I still find the old time pictures very interesting. Some of our family are still farming, I wish we had taken more pictures back then , even in my lifetime.

I liked the story about hooking up in the rail road track plowing snow, liked the line about the young boy shouting out.

I spent many hours riding on tractors with my grandad and uncles when I was still to young to reach the pedals. Just wonder looking back how I stuck it being shook around .

Alex.

Alex,

It is always good to hear from the young guys. I'm glad you like what you've seen. In the old days, before computers and the internet, I'd have likely just used my time rocking in a chair and telling a grandkid my stories, but this way... I get to tell the world! (Everyone else is probably whispering, under their breath, "Darn Kid.... don't encourage him!!"?) If you are just about 40, you are just a little younger than my oldest child, son Mike, who used that language on me when I hit the RR track.

Mike became an excellent hand around the farm and is a very responsible person today at age 41. I put a picture of him on the 4568, with the #55 IH chisel plow. That M-F 760 at the right is probably a little more like something you'd find in the UK? At least the color and name?

Thanks again Alex,

post-5643-1165590650_thumb.jpg

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Old binder guy,

I spent many hours riding on tractors with my grandad and uncles when I was still to young to reach the pedals.

Alex.

Alex,

I just re-read you post. I got to thinking about what you said about being too young to reach the pedals. I remember when I had that problem too. I remember sitting on new Farmall Ms & Hs, etc. at Bourke Motor and Implement in Lewistown, MT. I know I got my butt chewed on more than once for hitting the starter button on those new tractors. Maybe it is for that reason, I don't consider them as "antiques" yet. Now, my F-14s, I call them antiques because they are unstyled, I guess. It is kind of like what my concept was of "old cars" when I was a kid. If they had wooden spokes, they were a "Model T".

Here I am blowing hot & cold again. What I came on here for, was to ask if I was the only one, or whether any of you other old timers had the problem of your foot slipping off of the clutch on a W-9 or WD-9 and have it take skin off of and cause bruises on your shins like I did? They had powerful springs and short legs didn't help, plus the pedal was quite slick, after a little wear on the face of the pedal.

Gary ;)

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Yes I spent many hours riding on tractors , but when I was old enough , and tall enough I started to drive on my own. I guess the same as everbody who run tractors when young. I started on simple jobs like harrowing and rolling. Then raking and mowing, had to get some serious practice in before I could start reversing carts.

I spent most of my first years driving a MF 165, the tractor would be only a few years old then, I don't know if you remember the MF's. The clutch pedal had it's pivot to the rear and this made it light to use, I could put all my weight down on this easy.

The IH 574 was light clutch to, but they had a Leyland tractor. My little 9 year old legs had a job to work that .

Still have the 165 in the family, I will restore it some time. Oh btw. it has power steering too.

Great storys.

Alex.

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Alex,

I started mowing hay at age 9 with Dad's Farmall Cub and a 4 foot belly mounted cobalt blue sickle mower. Our Cub didn't have hydraulics, but only that cussed, long blue lever over the gear shift. We had very hilly hay ground. I got to be extremely careful not to plug up, from overlapping the cut hay. When I plugged, I had to stop, put it in neutral, lock the brakes, lift the lever - pushing the button with one hand and lifting the mower with both hands. Then I'd unlock the brakes, back up to clear the hay, pull forward to where I'd stopped mowing, put it in neutral, lock the brake, push the button with one hand and drop the mower with both hands, sit down, unlock the brake, put it in gear and proceed on mowing. Our country's famed OSHA would have had fun with that one. I really liked mowing hay. Once in a while I got to use the Farmall M my older brother eventually got to mow with. Then Dad bought a Farmall Super A, with hydraulics and I really liked mowing with that, but they soon found we needed a tractor to pull the pair of IH side delivery rakes and that became my job. That was boring, except when climbing one hill we had, that pulled hard enough that it lifted the front wheels off of the ground, all of the way up - until the hill leveled out some. I had to steer it with the wheel brakes, as the field looped around a small grove of trees on that hill. The first time I got into that situation, I thought "S--t, it's all over!" I mastered it from then on.

Gary ;)

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I spent most of my first years driving a MF 165, the tractor would be only a few years old then, I don't know if you remember the MF's. The clutch pedal had it's pivot to the rear and this made it light to use, I could put all my weight down on this easy.

Alex.

I too started out driving a 165 Massey. Pretty easy for a kid to get the hang of too and that clutch setup made it so much easier.

Moved from the 165 to a white stripe open 1466 then on to the big boys, a 4840 and 8630. Pretty big stuff for a 5th grade kid to handle.

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In the fourth (the darn thing got flipped on me, somehow... me and computers?) photo, I have no idea who owned the little Farmall Cub; like I first drove at age 6 and mowed hay with at 9, but it gives me the excuse of placing this photo here. My friend Kevin M. Small took this picture of the NTA show at Wauseon, Ohio in 1994 at their 50th Anniversary. I am on the 32hp Reeves cross compound Canadian Special steam engine at right, steering. I have memories of playing on this engine as early as at least age 3. It was the engine my dad and his brothers plowed with from 1920 through 1938, when it became too wet to farm with these big engines. Moisture hadn't been a hinderance, much, during the early part of "the Dirty Thirties." Dad traded the engine in 1954, for another smaller engine and eventually this engine sold and went to Ohio. It was owned at the time of this photo, by the late Marvin Brodbeck, president of the NTA at that time. This was the first time I'd ever seen this engine running and I enjoyed spending a couple of days on it, despite the 5" of rain the show had dumped on it. The Reeves and the Cub in the picture were "step sisters by marriage." Emerson-Brantingham bought Reeves & Company and took possession on January 1, 1912. Emerson-Brantingham was losing their behinds when they more or less dropped Reeves about 1922 or 23. The Reeves factory at Columbus, Indiana burned in 1925. In 1926 (I'm pretty sure), J.I. Case bought portions of what remained of Emerson-Brantingham, mainly haying and cultivating equiment. Case did not get the Reeves portion of E-B. You all know the history of Tenneco getting J.I Case & International Harvester...hence, the "step sisters by marriage."

The third photo is of my son Mike, at Helena, Montana, several years ago. My cousin gave me this 1941 Farmall M and I wouldn't have bothered picking it up, if Mike hadn't wanted it. It wasn't much. He tore it apart in his shop and rebuilt it. He uses it to plow, grade roads and take pleasure trips for his little son Jacob, who really likes tractors.

The second is a picture of my 1939 Farmall H belted to a friend's buzz saw at one of our NWAPA shows near Columbia Falls about ten years ago. She is #FBH681 or the 181st Farmall H built.

This first photo is of my son Mike with his 300 Utility and IH loader after he got it about three years ago. He keeps it in town in the winter and at his place on Silver Creek in the summer. It looks a little nicer now than it did when he got it, but it was and is a great little tractor.

Gary

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post-5643-1165620601_thumb.jpg

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All of this talk about first tractors driven has me thinking. I first recall driving a unstyled AR on steel, I was told not to push the clutch in all the way but I did any way, well it took all I had to disengage the clutch, It was before I was in 1st grade I might not have been in Kindergarden yet. Big stuff for a lttle guy.

Latter I was told that I had to push down on the clutch of our 1456 with the motor off before I could drive it. I practiced every chance I got untll I could when I did I thought it was the greatest thing working ground. Untill when I was in 5th or 6th grade I had chicken pox, we were to be out of school for 7 days for quarintine, well after the first couple of days I felt better and was able to go with dad, it was planting time, I spent every day after that working ground with a NEW 6788 I thought I was in heaven.

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Dr. Ernie,

When I was about 8, I asked Dad when I could start plowing (with a TD-40) as I'd ride with him. He had a pat answer: "When you can crank it and start it all by yourself!!!" Dad never used antifreeze in any of the farm tractors. He swore it was better to use pure spring water, which is what we drank on the Judith Basin homestead. Each fall, he had a ritual about the time it started to frost. He drained the combines, tractors, TracTracTors and whatever.

In the fall, when I was 10, Dad and Mom went to my aunt and uncle's place in Billings, while attending a convention. My only living grandparent I ever had, my maternal grandmother, stayed at the farm so there was food on the table for my brother, my uncle and myself. Well, I came home from the one room school house at Glengarry (population 8), I grabbed a cookie and a glass of milk and headed outside to play. I headed out to the shop and then back into the machine shed. There were two TD-40 TracTracTors in there. I'd watched Dad crank them up when in the field plowing. So I turned the knurled knob over on the diesel pump until the notch pointed outward, then latched the decompression lever and hooked it up. I turned on the gasoline, walked around to the other side, turned the magneto over until the impulse was set and in the notch, gave the primer five shots - after I could feel gas (as Dad had always shown me all of these things). I pulled the crank out of the leather "holder upper" and tried to turn it over. I hadn't eaten enough Wheaties or mashed potatoes or both? So I climbed up onto the front of the right track, had the crank set at "3:o'clock", grabbed the radiator and plunged downward as hard as I could. CRAP!!!! The darn thing started! Now what? I ran for the gas valve and shut it off. I didn't open the throttle, so when it kicked over onto diesel, it died. NO WATER!

For a while, I was afraid to tell Dad, but when he started it in the spring, it didn't miss or put out blue smoke and was I sure relieved. However, there was a splendid benefit that spring!!! I did get to plow, after I showed him that I could start it, ALL BY MYSELF!

Gary ;)

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What I came on here for, was to ask if I was the only one, or whether any of you other old timers had the problem of your foot slipping off of the clutch on a W-9 or WD-9 and have it take skin off of and cause bruises on your shins like I did? They had powerful springs and short legs didn't help, plus the pedal was quite slick, after a little wear on the face of the pedal.

Gary ;)

Gary, never having had the opportunity to drive any of the W series tractors I can't comment on the clutch . I do seem to recall having that happen on one of the Cockshutt 40s though. I also recall the extremely tight spring on the clutch pedal that those six speed 930 Case with the wet clutch had. I used to drive a neighbours helping out once in a while and always noticed how hard on the left knee joint that 930 clutch was. Later models were much better.

Heres the best pic I have of a local W9 taken in a parade summer of 05. Too bad I cut off the Case threshing machine but they used it in a threshing demo later in the day.

W9thresher.jpg

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Gary that is a funny story, the way it was going I thought you were goig to say that you burned it up or somehing like that. From what I understand water is better at removing heat than water, but with antifreze, as you well know it boils at a higher tep., but the heat transfer is not as great.

I hope the water you used was not the standard fare crap water as is almot every where. I brought back a TD-14A and was in he process of over hualing it, had a cracked sleave (not uncommon) Well I was pulling the sleaves to change out the o-rings when I discovered the build up in the block, I filled a little 1 gal shop vac 3 or 4 times, I would be suppised that it was not overheating. I was telling Jim Schilling abut this and he told me that he had bought a tractor once that was overheating, could not figer it out well, having a hunch he pulled the head and pulled a sleave the build up was almost to the top of the block. I do not rember what tractor it was maybe a W-30, what ever it was it had wet sleaves.

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Loadstar,

Take my word for it... The W & WD-9 had one he11 of a clutch on them. That was a late Case thresher that guy was pulling with his W-9. There is one of those "all red" Case threshers on Interstate 90 between Missoula and Butte and I've watched it deteriorate over the decades. It is amazing how well the red paint lasted on them.

Gary ;)

Dr. Ernie,

Our water was very good water. I'd seen and pulled many wet sleeves over the years and never ever saw a buildup as you talk of. It sure sounds feasible though.

I lost a lower o-ring on my TD-18A 181series once. I had to put in new rod and main bearings, as the antifreeze got it instantly. I shut her off, while dozing, as the temperature started to rise and the oil pressure started to drop. That was the only one I ever lost during use. I don't ever remember Dad mentioning losing one during use.

I can sure understand how you would sure lose your heat transfer from the sleeve, once it built up very much inside the block and against the sleeve.

Gary ;)

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My moms side of the family came from around Lewistown Montana, farmed there all there life. Anybody know Robert or Clarence Lang? Been trying to get up there before they are all gone.

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Dr. Ernie,

When I was about 8, I asked Dad when I could start plowing (with a TD-40) as I'd ride with him. He had a pat answer: "When you can crank it and start it all by yourself!!!" Dad never used antifreeze in any of the farm tractors. He swore it was better to use pure spring water, which is what we drank on the Judith Basin homestead. Each fall, he had a ritual about the time it started to frost. He drained the combines, tractors, TracTracTors and whatever.

In the fall, when I was 10, Dad and Mom went to my aunt and uncle's place in Billings, while attending a convention. My only living grandparent I ever had, my maternal grandmother, stayed at the farm so there was food on the table for my brother, my uncle and myself. Well, I came home from the one room school house at Glengarry (population 8), I grabbed a cookie and a glass of milk and headed outside to play. I headed out to the shop and then back into the machine shed. There were two TD-40 TracTracTors in there. I'd watched Dad crank them up when in the field plowing. So I turned the knurled knob over on the diesel pump until the notch pointed outward, then latched the decompression lever and hooked it up. I turned on the gasoline, walked around to the other side, turned the magneto over until the impulse was set and in the notch, gave the primer five shots - after I could feel gas (as Dad had always shown me all of these things). I pulled the crank out of the leather "holder upper" and tried to turn it over. I hadn't eaten enough Wheaties or mashed potatoes or both? So I climbed up onto the front of the right track, had the crank set at "3:o'clock", grabbed the radiator and plunged downward as hard as I could. CRAP!!!! The darn thing started! Now what? I ran for the gas valve and shut it off. I didn't open the throttle, so when it kicked over onto diesel, it died. NO WATER!

For a while, I was afraid to tell Dad, but when he started it in the spring, it didn't miss or put out blue smoke and was I sure relieved. However, there was a splendid benefit that spring!!! I did get to plow, after I showed him that I could start it, ALL BY MYSELF!

Gary ;)

OBG---Strange what a person forgets until somebody starts talking about similar situations. I also had my first crawler driving experience on a TD-40, but not quite as young as you mentioned. Maybe about 5th or 6th grade age. For me it wasn't so much about getting the beast started as it was about being able to pull the steering clutches and managing the brakes. The first 40 we had had both brakes on the right side, a sort of carryover from some models having a foot clutch I was told. It could be kind of confusing sometimes, but at the time it was all we knew. Eventually more TD-35's and 40's were added to the "fleet" so I think I can say I've experienced most things about them. We ran them late in their lives, long after TD-9's and 14's came out, so they were cheap and in varying states of repair. Starting on the first pull (or push as you indicated) was rare, probably never. The primers hardly ever were in working order so I never used them. Instead we had it figured out something like two upward pulls on the crank at full choke (until you could hear it weeze), then start on the third pull with no choke. Or some variation of that, depending on your luck and the particular tractor you were trying to start.

One thing I do remember was that if you got the system wrong for that particular beast, and had the misfortune of flooding it with gas, then you could look forward to many more pulls just to try to clear it. If the engine was warm and you had eaten lots of wheaties that morning you might be able to "spin" it. When we were full grown "young bucks" we used to show off that way.

Of about 6 or 7 35's and 40's that passed through here over time, I only recall maybe 2 that ever saw antifreeze. Many of them ran with cracked heads, and ran well that way. I believe the problem was a narrow and weak point between valve seats on the rear cylinder that was chronically starved for coolant flow. Overheat the engine just once and you were probably in that situation. But, they would still run and only a minute amount of water would seep into the cylinder and the engine simply burned it out. Keep straight water in it and there was no problem. In early and late season work we would simply drain the radiator into a 5 gallon bucket at night, dump it back in in the morning. The large adjustable packing gland on the water pump was greasable so it didn't mind this system at all. I think the repeated draining helped keep any serious rust from accumulating in the system. We didn't worry too much about the engine block, just the radiator core freezing. Temperatures weren't that severe that we figured the massive block would get below freezing during the night. If we were nervous about it we would open the block drain **** also. When finally put away, the whole system would be drained.

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I see with the potty filter we have the word co*k can not be used, now we have to call male chickens roosters and re word things, it is sad that we can not use certian words because of some people. SAD

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Dr. Ernie,

When I was about 8, I asked Dad when I could start plowing (with a TD-40) as I'd ride with him. He had a pat answer: "When you can crank it and start it all by yourself!!!" Dad never used antifreeze in any of the farm tractors. He swore it was better to use pure spring water, which is what we drank on the Judith Basin homestead. Each fall, he had a ritual about the time it started to frost. He drained the combines, tractors, TracTracTors and whatever.

In the fall, when I was 10, Dad and Mom went to my aunt and uncle's place in Billings, while attending a convention. My only living grandparent I ever had, my maternal grandmother, stayed at the farm so there was food on the table for my brother, my uncle and myself. Well, I came home from the one room school house at Glengarry (population 8), I grabbed a cookie and a glass of milk and headed outside to play. I headed out to the shop and then back into the machine shed. There were two TD-40 TracTracTors in there. I'd watched Dad crank them up when in the field plowing. So I turned the knurled knob over on the diesel pump until the notch pointed outward, then latched the decompression lever and hooked it up. I turned on the gasoline, walked around to the other side, turned the magneto over until the impulse was set and in the notch, gave the primer five shots - after I could feel gas (as Dad had always shown me all of these things). I pulled the crank out of the leather "holder upper" and tried to turn it over. I hadn't eaten enough Wheaties or mashed potatoes or both? So I climbed up onto the front of the right track, had the crank set at "3:o'clock", grabbed the radiator and plunged downward as hard as I could. CRAP!!!! The darn thing started! Now what? I ran for the gas valve and shut it off. I didn't open the throttle, so when it kicked over onto diesel, it died. NO WATER!

For a while, I was afraid to tell Dad, but when he started it in the spring, it didn't miss or put out blue smoke and was I sure relieved. However, there was a splendid benefit that spring!!! I did get to plow, after I showed him that I could start it, ALL BY MYSELF!

Gary ;)

post-6771-1165805247_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1165805280_thumb.jpg Found a couple of photos of one of the better TD-40's we had. Taken in early fifties.

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]post-6771-1165805280_thumb.jpg Found a couple of photos of one of the better TD-40's we had. Taken in early fifties.

Palouse

That is certainly some open country you have there in the background. Nice old L truck too. Maybe a 160,, 170?

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Dr. Ernie,

When I was about 8, I asked Dad when I could start plowing (with a TD-40) as I'd ride with him. He had a pat answer: "When you can crank it and start it all by yourself!!!" Dad never used antifreeze in any of the farm tractors. He swore it was better to use pure spring water, which is what we drank on the Judith Basin homestead. Each fall, he had a ritual about the time it started to frost. He drained the combines, tractors, TracTracTors and whatever.

In the fall, when I was 10, Dad and Mom went to my aunt and uncle's place in Billings, while attending a convention. My only living grandparent I ever had, my maternal grandmother, stayed at the farm so there was food on the table for my brother, my uncle and myself. Well, I came home from the one room school house at Glengarry (population 8), I grabbed a cookie and a glass of milk and headed outside to play. I headed out to the shop and then back into the machine shed. There were two TD-40 TracTracTors in there. I'd watched Dad crank them up when in the field plowing. So I turned the knurled knob over on the diesel pump until the notch pointed outward, then latched the decompression lever and hooked it up. I turned on the gasoline, walked around to the other side, turned the magneto over until the impulse was set and in the notch, gave the primer five shots - after I could feel gas (as Dad had always shown me all of these things). I pulled the crank out of the leather "holder upper" and tried to turn it over. I hadn't eaten enough Wheaties or mashed potatoes or both? So I climbed up onto the front of the right track, had the crank set at "3:o'clock", grabbed the radiator and plunged downward as hard as I could. CRAP!!!! The darn thing started! Now what? I ran for the gas valve and shut it off. I didn't open the throttle, so when it kicked over onto diesel, it died. NO WATER!

For a while, I was afraid to tell Dad, but when he started it in the spring, it didn't miss or put out blue smoke and was I sure relieved. However, there was a splendid benefit that spring!!! I did get to plow, after I showed him that I could start it, ALL BY MYSELF!

Gary ;)

post-6771-1165805247_thumb.jpgpost-6771-1165805280_thumb.jpg Found a couple of photos of one of the better TD-40's we had. Taken in early fifties.

Palouse,

Thanks for posting pictures here. I love 'em. How wide were the pads on the TD-40 with the radiator problems? They sure look wide... even wider than the wide gauge Dad had used. I remember TD-40 radiators being torn down and "punched out" from time to time. I think they ground down a bandsaw blade to fit as the punch. I also remember one having the overflow tube breaking, or more likely rotting away, and the water level fell to the top of the core, only. It would run a little warm and had to be torn apart. I was always amazed that normally, when running water in a TD-40, you could remove the cap after just shutting it off and stick your hand into the water, without losing two layers of skin.

Loadstar, I noticed the L-170 (likely) and have ridden many miles in one. Was that other tractor a 300 or 350 Utility, Palouse? I had a neighbor who owned a 350 diesel and I always thought I'd have liked to own it. Does anyone remember, was that an English motor? I don't think it was IH? I don't know and can't remember, but I had scrambled eggs for breakfast! Now aren't you impressed!?!

Gary ;)

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Palouse,

I guess we need to bounce things off of each other, as this has the same effect on me. We had (my cousins still have) a 1933 TD-40 TracTracTor and it also had both brakes on the right side. I think all of the rest of ours had them, one on each side, but it also had a hand clutch? I agree, it could be confusing, when the others got you used to using your left foot to turn left and with those, your right foot did all of the braking. I had a T-20 with a foot clutch, but we never had any TD-40s with a foot clutch either. Dad always kept our primers working good. Somewhere, we once had a little parts box that had the leathers for the primer in there. Dad had a bad shoulder... May have torn his rotator cuff a little sometime in his life, like I tore he11 out of mine a couple of years ago. Anyway, he liked those primers. We always left a little choke on, so it'd keep running when started. Even using the primers, you could over do the gas and get it so it wouldn't start. I hated that, as it took a lot of cranking to finally get her running. We also controlled the speed of the motor on gas with the choke too. I'm like you. My uncle had a TD-14 from around 1948 or 49. We continued to run only TD-40s for plowing each spring, but did start to use WD-9s for some cultivation and rod weeding. We had three of them. Then I got the 1953 TD18A (down in the Construction Equipment threads) in 1956 and pretty much made it the workhorse and the TD-40s started to take on a little less work. Of course the one with electric starter and Holt dozer, got used around the calendar.

Crap... I just lost a bunch of what I'd written. I don't know what I hit to do that? Oh well, It may come back to me? I just placed a picture of me and my grandson, Maverik, on my 1935 TD-40. It is an early 1935, but should be gray, as it was originally. It will be again.

Gary ;)

OBG---Strange what a person forgets until somebody starts talking about similar situations. I also had my first crawler driving experience on a TD-40, but not quite as young as you mentioned. Maybe about 5th or 6th grade age. For me it wasn't so much about getting the beast started as it was about being able to pull the steering clutches and managing the brakes. The first 40 we had had both brakes on the right side, a sort of carryover from some models having a foot clutch I was told. It could be kind of confusing sometimes, but at the time it was all we knew. Eventually more TD-35's and 40's were added to the "fleet" so I think I can say I've experienced most things about them. We ran them late in their lives, long after TD-9's and 14's came out, so they were cheap and in varying states of repair. Starting on the first pull (or push as you indicated) was rare, probably never. The primers hardly ever were in working order so I never used them. Instead we had it figured out something like two upward pulls on the crank at full choke (until you could hear it weeze), then start on the third pull with no choke. Or some variation of that, depending on your luck and the particular tractor you were trying to start. Like you, I remember draining just the radiator at night, when it just froze at night, when still doing field work. Like you say, you could pour it back in the next morning. Of course Dad would go to the basement, where the IH cream separator was operated and get a couple of buckets of pretty hot water to take out to the old 40 with the dozer, to get it started. I guess he learned that with Model T Fords? The TD-18A 181 series I had with the Bucyrus Dozer (also down in the Construction Thread), I put a 2500 watt tank heater on it to keep the anti freeze warm and kept a heater under the oil pan, in the shed. It always started good. I sure liked plowing snow with it. I guess maybe I liked plowing snow, because even being miserable in the weather, I still loved listening to those two exhausts "cackling" at me. This is great to talk about, as I'll likely never, ever do any of that stuff, other than to crank up the one TD-40 I've kept. I guess I should put a picture of that old girl here?

Gary

One thing I do remember was that if you got the system wrong for that particular beast, and had the misfortune of flooding it with gas, then you could look forward to many more pulls just to try to clear it. If the engine was warm and you had eaten lots of wheaties that morning you might be able to "spin" it. When we were full grown "young bucks" we used to show off that way.

Of about 6 or 7 35's and 40's that passed through here over time, I only recall maybe 2 that ever saw antifreeze. Many of them ran with cracked heads, and ran well that way. I believe the problem was a narrow and weak point between valve seats on the rear cylinder that was chronically starved for coolant flow. Overheat the engine just once and you were probably in that situation. But, they would still run and only a minute amount of water would seep into the cylinder and the engine simply burned it out. Keep straight water in it and there was no problem. In early and late season work we would simply drain the radiator into a 5 gallon bucket at night, dump it back in in the morning. The large adjustable packing gland on the water pump was greasable so it didn't mind this system at all. I think the repeated draining helped keep any serious rust from accumulating in the system. We didn't worry too much about the engine block, just the radiator core freezing. Temperatures weren't that severe that we figured the massive block would get below freezing during the night. If we were nervous about it we would open the block drain **** also. When finally put away, the whole system would be drained.

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