Old Binder Guy

IH Tractors on Montana Farm

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These are great! Not many early farmers had cameras and if they did, they apparently never used them. My family has hardly any pictures of the early days.

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Yes, excellent photos OBG. True, there were a lot of missed photo ops here too in the past. I do have a few showing farming operations but many of them are a different shade of red power.

Bet those boys were pretty proud to be the haying crew at that age.

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These are great! Not many early farmers had cameras and if they did, they apparently never used them. My family has hardly any pictures of the early days.

PhilipC,

My mother had an old Kodak black box camera and my brother had a little Brownie Hawkeye. If I got to take a picture, it was usually quite an occasion. We didn't always have film and many times, before the film was used up, the last pictures wern't very good due to the old film. I have always been keen about seeing a situation that needed a photo taken. I have gotten more wasteful in later years. My kids will have a lot of photos to go through when I check out. I have a lot of pictures of the old days, but I can think of a whole bunch more I wished I HAD taken.

These aren't my tractors, but I thought they would fit here. The first is of an International 8-16 that was at Choteau, Montana, at their show several years ago. The second picture shows several 15-30 McCormick-Deering tractors pulling combines in eastern Montana.

Gary ;)

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That combine shot is cool, but all these pictures... we never run across these pictures anymore!!! This is the time of my grandfather and great grandfathers, of whom I have very few pictures of their older farm operations. Superior pictures, very unique.

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That combine shot is cool, but all these pictures... we never run across these pictures anymore!!! This is the time of my grandfather and great grandfathers, of whom I have very few pictures of their older farm operations. Superior pictures, very unique.

Tim,

They are the pictures of my dad's era. My first photo in this thread shows my dad pulling a combine, very similar to these, with a tractor, very similar to these. My Grandpa was dead by the time this picture was taken. Us old f@rts should be good for something, right? I'm glad you enjoy them. I'm going to be gone for a week, so I'll likely have to do a search to find this thread by the time I arrive back from Seattle.

It's a shame to not post a picture when posting? My picture is from the Mehmke photo collection. I don't know what the tractor is, but it is IHC.

Gary ;)

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I thought my last post before I leave for Seattle, for thanksgiving with my youngest daughter, I'd post these pictures of yesteryear on the homestead in central Montana.

The first picture is of my daughter Michaelle and son Mike on my 660 standard. The second picture is of Mike plowing with this tractor, back in the 1970s and the last picture is of my daughter Mevanie on her bicycle beside my 4568 in the late 1970s.

Gary ;)

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Great photos. Have enjoyed each and everyone of them. Have a nice Thanksgiving with your daughter and a safe trip home. :D

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I thought my last post before I leave for Seattle, for thanksgiving with my youngest daughter, I'd post these pictures of yesteryear on the homestead in central Montana.

The first picture is of my daughter Michaelle and son Mike on my 660 standard. The second picture is of Mike plowing with this tractor, back in the 1970s and the last picture is of my daughter Mevanie on her bicycle beside my 4568 in the late 1970s.

Gary ;)

That 4568 is a powerful looking machine. The IH V8 I am guessing? I see my favourite series GMC pickup in the background too,

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This is a picture I took of my 300 Utility after I painted it about 1967. In the background is my IH B-100 V-8 pickup and my IH A-160 truck. The Cub Cadet was my dad's and was the second one sold in central Montana.

I went through the 300 UTA and put 350 sleeves & pistons in it, making quite a tractor out of it. I really liked this tractor. My son liked it so much he found one with an IH loader and when I get it scanned, I will post it here too. You can see the 100 Balanced Head Mower on the fast hitch. That is primarily what I used it for. I had a set of chains, a Comfort Cover, and a blade for winter.

Gary ;)

This is another picture I ran into of another tractor in my past. This is a 1952 WD-9 with a MacDonald cab, hitched to an IH 14' #150 Shovel Drill.

Gary ;)

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Really nice photos. It is nice to see photos of the red tractors working in different areas of the country. Thanks

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OBG - Ever thought about doing a picture book/ family type history of these photos - along with the stories? it would be great to have - as many said before - there aren't many photos around of that time!

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OBG - Ever thought about doing a picture book/ family type history of these photos - along with the stories? it would be great to have - as many said before - there aren't many photos around of that time!

Rusty's Daughter,

I hadn't thought of one, but you've got me thinking. I retire in less than a year and a half. I am involved in two different books, one assisting and another I'm writing, on Reeves steam engines. I will give your idea some thought. I don't do these things for the money or recognition. I do it to preserve history and my proud heritage on a Montana dirt farm. Just the pictures I have on other Red Power threads would be quite interesting, but I'm thinking of my late cousin's widow and all of the stuff she has regarding the neighboring operation he and his father had. I think our combined families there could have come up with more than 50 IH tractors and 20 IH trucks in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

Gary

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This is a picture I took of my 300 Utility after I painted it about 1967. In the background is my IH B-100 V-8 pickup and my IH A-160 truck. The Cub Cadet was my dad's and was the second one sold in central Montana.

I went through the 300 UTA and put 350 sleeves & pistons in it, making quite a tractor out of it. I really liked this tractor. My son liked it so much he found one with an IH loader and when I get it scanned, I will post it here too. You can see the 100 Balanced Head Mower on the fast hitch. That is primarily what I used it for. I had a set of chains, a Comfort Cover, and a blade for winter.

Gary ;)

This is another picture I ran into of another tractor in my past. This is a 1952 WD-9 with a MacDonald cab, hitched to an IH 14' #150 Shovel Drill.

Gary ;)

Those old pictures are priceless! Thanks for puttin' them up. An old guy like me can remember just enough of those old days to really appreciate what those pictures show. I've got sort of a pencil sketched picture of a WD-9 with a cab like that pulling a rod weeder I got several years ago in Harlowtown when I was crossing Montana. The picture is by Don Greytak. I've never seen a cab like that on a tractor here in the midwest.(except at shows).

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This is a picture I took of my 300 Utility after I painted it about 1967. In the background is my IH B-100 V-8 pickup and my IH A-160 truck. The Cub Cadet was my dad's and was the second one sold in central Montana.

I went through the 300 UTA and put 350 sleeves & pistons in it, making quite a tractor out of it. I really liked this tractor. My son liked it so much he found one with an IH loader and when I get it scanned, I will post it here too. You can see the 100 Balanced Head Mower on the fast hitch. That is primarily what I used it for. I had a set of chains, a Comfort Cover, and a blade for winter.

Gary ;)

This is another picture I ran into of another tractor in my past. This is a 1952 WD-9 with a MacDonald cab, hitched to an IH 14' #150 Shovel Drill.

Gary ;)

Those old pictures are priceless! Thanks for puttin' them up. An old guy like me can remember just enough of those old days to really appreciate what those pictures show. I've got sort of a pencil sketched picture of a WD-9 with a cab like that pulling a rod weeder I got several years ago in Harlowtown when I was crossing Montana. The picture is by Don Greytak. I've never seen a cab like that on a tractor here in the midwest.(except at shows).

Dukester,

You are welcome for puttin' 'em up. I'm old enough to rember these days well too. And Don Greytak is a friend of mine at Havre. Isn't he about the finest pencil artist of agricultural items you've ever seen? I have that very same picture of the WD-9 with MacDonald cab and pulling a pair of IH #5 rod weeders. I have created that very scene in person, when I hit neighbor Roger Long's fence between us, pulling the exact same equipment, except our #5 rod weeders were crank & screw lifts and Greytak's picture shows the other lever lift type of #5s. When I saw that picture, I was haunted, because I looked exactly like that guy in the cab, when I was the age I hit the barbed wire. I have about another 10 of Don's pencil drawings. My son has about a half dozen too. I told Don, if I bought anymore of his pictures, I'd have to add a partition down the middle of my house, just to have wall space to hang them.

Gary ;)

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OBG - Ever thought about doing a picture book/ family type history of these photos - along with the stories? it would be great to have - as many said before - there aren't many photos around of that time!

Rusty's Daughter,

I hadn't thought of one, but you've got me thinking. I retire in less than a year and a half. I am involved in two different books, one assisting and another I'm writing, on Reeves steam engines. I will give your idea some thought. I don't do these things for the money or recognition. I do it to preserve history and my proud heritage on a Montana dirt farm. Just the pictures I have on other Red Power threads would be quite interesting, but I'm thinking of my late cousin's widow and all of the stuff she has regarding the neighboring operation he and his father had. I think our combined families there could have come up with more than 50 IH tractors and 20 IH trucks in the 1940s, 1950s and 1960s.

Gary

This IS history - and definantly something to be proud of!

Us dirt kids (both in the east of the USA and here in Australia) don't really know what it's like to be a farmer in the land of the big sky - it would be an eye-opener to be able to read about first-hand experiences of life that way! I would look forward to reading such a book!

B)

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I have one up on you sis, I drove 2500 miles to drive a 5020 in the middle of know where when I had spent thousands of hrs on one here and disliked the tractor I was jelouse of he neighbor on his D-6,D ag cat with a nice cab. BTW, I enjoyed running that 5020. :ph34r:

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And Don Greytak is a friend of mine at Havre. Isn't he about the finest pencil artist of agricultural items you've ever seen? I have that very same picture of the WD-9 with MacDonald cab and pulling a pair of IH #5 rod weeders.

http://www.dongreytak.com/

Have to admit I'd never heard of Don Greytak the artist but after searching up this website I see he does some very impressive work showing some real farm and ranch type activities and machinery.

Had to smile at the one showing the JD 105 combine unloading grain into a truck with the endgate open. Been there, done that, more than once, and shovelled more than a few bushels back onto the truck by hand.

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I'm new to the forum, since about the first of the month. Been reading up on all the boards, trying to decide where to jump in. Your mention of the good ol' days helped light my fire. So, will toss in a couple of my favorite scenes from farming days gone by. These were taken probably in the spring of 1960 by my dad on the family farm. I eventually came to farm it myself. The fellow on the tractor is my brother-in-law, basically a city boy from the midwest. I was away at college at the moment so guess he was filling in.

That was one of a handful of IH TD-35's that my dad accumulated from here and there, along with a couple of TD-40's. Sorry about the color of the rod weeders, but we farmed with whatever came along in those days. IH was strong here so most of the equipment was red.

I also hope that you keep the "blasts from the past" coming. They add flavor to the whole industry.

Used to know a guy who farmed north of Denton and down into where the Judith River meets the Missouri, name of Musick. Been a long time, lost touch with him. How we got to know each other is a farm story by itself.

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I'm new to the forum, since about the first of the month. Been reading up on all the boards, trying to decide where to jump in. Your mention of the good ol' days helped light my fire. So, will toss in a couple of my favorite scenes from farming days gone by. These were taken probably in the spring of 1960 by my dad on the family farm. I eventually came to farm it myself. The fellow on the tractor is my brother-in-law, basically a city boy from the midwest. I was away at college at the moment so guess he was filling in.

That was one of a handful of IH TD-35's that my dad accumulated from here and there, along with a couple of TD-40's. Sorry about the color of the rod weeders, but we farmed with whatever came along in those days. IH was strong here so most of the equipment was red.

I also hope that you keep the "blasts from the past" coming. They add flavor to the whole industry.

Used to know a guy who farmed north of Denton and down into where the Judith River meets the Missouri, name of Musick. Been a long time, lost touch with him. How we got to know each other is a farm story by itself.

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Palouse,

Welcome aboard. I'm new too. I knew Johnny Musik, the IH dealer at Denton very well, 25 years ago. If you go down to the construction equipment area and look up my crawler stuff there (TD-18 & TD-40) you'll see me dragging some green stuff too.

Gary ;)

And Don Greytak is a friend of mine at Havre. Isn't he about the finest pencil artist of agricultural items you've ever seen? I have that very same picture of the WD-9 with MacDonald cab and pulling a pair of IH #5 rod weeders.

http://www.dongreytak.com/

Have to admit I'd never heard of Don Greytak the artist but after searching up this website I see he does some very impressive work showing some real farm and ranch type activities and machinery.

Had to smile at the one showing the JD 105 combine unloading grain into a truck with the endgate open. Been there, done that, more than once, and shovelled more than a few bushels back onto the truck by hand.

Loadstar,

I haven't been on Don's website for a long time, but I've given that one of the JD combine to my son. The grain running out was the "story" he puts in each picture. The hitting the barbed wire fence was the one of the WD-9 I discussed. Don grew up on the Havre farm and understands the perils of agriculture. He works that into each picture... from experience. Another I gave to my son was one of about a 12 year old boy inside the cab of an early 1950s Chevy truck, the boy clutching the wheel and trying to start the truck while his dad is stopped with a grain tank full of grain, waving his cap, in the distance. There's always a story. I think he is one of the finest agriculture, farm life type artist to ever hit our just past generation. I still like Charlie Russell too, however. Charlie used to ride through our place to Cottonwood, Montana after my granddad homesteaded in the Judith Basin in 1881. Greytak has captured the mechanized generation on the farm. I have all of his steam and threshing pictures too.

Gary ;)

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I'm new to the forum, since about the first of the month. Been reading up on all the boards, trying to decide where to jump in. Your mention of the good ol' days helped light my fire. So, will toss in a couple of my favorite scenes from farming days gone by. ]

Palouse , glad you jumped in here with some more great old pictures. I've always been fascinated by farming in the Palouse country ever since seeing a presentation some 30 years ago by a fertilizer company. Not sure of all the details after this many years but they touched on the steep topography of the farmland and the incredible depth of topsoil compared to our meagre 3 or 4 inches here in Sask. I've seen some amazing pictures of farming operations there on slopes that I can't imagine farming myself.

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I'm new to the forum, since about the first of the month. Been reading up on all the boards, trying to decide where to jump in. Your mention of the good ol' days helped light my fire. So, will toss in a couple of my favorite scenes from farming days gone by. ]

Palouse , glad you jumped in here with some more great old pictures. I've always been fascinated by farming in the Palouse country ever since seeing a presentation some 30 years ago by a fertilizer company. Not sure of all the details after this many years but they touched on the steep topography of the farmland and the incredible depth of topsoil compared to our meagre 3 or 4 inches here in Sask. I've seen some amazing pictures of farming operations there on slopes that I can't imagine farming myself.

Loadstar and Palouse,

That country in Washington state is very fascinating. My wife's uncle farmed in the Pullman are or near (sp?) Puyllup. He showed me pictures of his D-4D Cat pulling equipment on a sidehill of that farm and not only could you see the track pads through on the opposite side, between the seat and control panel, but I swear the hole in that turbo exhaust pipe was more round than oval.

Gary ;)

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I'm new to the forum, since about the first of the month. Been reading up on all the boards, trying to decide where to jump in. Your mention of the good ol' days helped light my fire. So, will toss in a couple of my favorite scenes from farming days gone by. These were taken probably in the spring of 1960 by my dad on the family farm. I eventually came to farm it myself. The fellow on the tractor is my brother-in-law, basically a city boy from the midwest. I was away at college at the moment so guess he was filling in.

That was one of a handful of IH TD-35's that my dad accumulated from here and there, along with a couple of TD-40's. Sorry about the color of the rod weeders, but we farmed with whatever came along in those days. IH was strong here so most of the equipment was red.

I also hope that you keep the "blasts from the past" coming. They add flavor to the whole industry.

Used to know a guy who farmed north of Denton and down into where the Judith River meets the Missouri, name of Musick. Been a long time, lost touch with him. How we got to know each other is a farm story by itself.

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Palouse,

Welcome aboard. I'm new too. I knew Johnny Musik, the IH dealer at Denton very well, 25 years ago. If you go down to the construction equipment area and look up my crawler stuff there (TD-18 & TD-40) you'll see me dragging some green stuff too.

Gary ;)

And Don Greytak is a friend of mine at Havre. Isn't he about the finest pencil artist of agricultural items you've ever seen? I have that very same picture of the WD-9 with MacDonald cab and pulling a pair of IH #5 rod weeders.

http://www.dongreytak.com/

Have to admit I'd never heard of Don Greytak the artist but after searching up this website I see he does some very impressive work showing some real farm and ranch type activities and machinery.

Had to smile at the one showing the JD 105 combine unloading grain into a truck with the endgate open. Been there, done that, more than once, and shovelled more than a few bushels back onto the truck by hand.

Loadstar,

I haven't been on Don's website for a long time, but I've given that one of the JD combine to my son. The grain running out was the "story" he puts in each picture. The hitting the barbed wire fence was the one of the WD-9 I discussed. Don grew up on the Havre farm and understands the perils of agriculture. He works that into each picture... from experience. Another I gave to my son was one of about a 12 year old boy inside the cab of an early 1950s Chevy truck, the boy clutching the wheel and trying to start the truck while his dad is stopped with a grain tank full of grain, waving his cap, in the distance. There's always a story. I think he is one of the finest agriculture, farm life type artist to ever hit our just past generation. I still like Charlie Russell too, however. Charlie used to ride through our place to Cottonwood, Montana after my granddad homesteaded in the Judith Basin in 1881. Greytak has captured the mechanized generation on the farm. I have all of his steam and threshing pictures too.

Gary ;)

Glad you liked the pics. I've got loads of them, will try to post some of the more interesting ones. Most are scanned from 50 year old slides, so color and resolution may leave something to be desired.

The 403 was photographed just last Labor Day at the county fair threshing bee. The two hillside 141's were photographed by my dad around 1960. The two scared drivers were my brother and my cousin. The brakes on those hillside conversions weren't that great and the straw could be slippery. The four way leveling systems were designed and built in Moscow Idaho for the 141's. Later models- 151, 403 and 453-were built by IH. With the coming of the axial flow combines, they got away from the concept of four way.

More to come as I sort and edit them.

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Palouse,

I love seeing pictures of IH equipment, in their element. You post away and we'll pretend you are on a Montana farm that had a couple of legs knocked off of one side.

I love old equipment. I started running steam engine 53 seasons ago and Model Ts 54 seasons ago. I've operated and seen a lot of old and fascinating equipment. I've often thought I was born 50 years too late, but I've come to see, from what kind people have told me, that I am sort of a "bridge to the past" for these young guys. I kind of think it was a compliment. My mind plays tricks on me sometimes, but I'm able to outrun that paranoia most of the time.

I don't know how you say it in digital computer lingo, but "I put a new piece of paper in the typewriter" as it was getting confusing to my mind, as to whether I was starting something new or replacing something old. Hope that is okay.

I sure liked the hillside combines. We had a few places that we could have used one, but not enough to warrant the extra expense, so we threw over a little grain on a couple of sidehills. I have a dandy photo I took of my 403 Windrow Special combine somewhere and I've seen it in the past month, but can't find it now. Oh well, I might find it pretty soon.

Keep posting, friend!

Gary ;)

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This was a picture of my darn near new 1967 806 Wheatland and 1967 1100 4X4 (must have had a good crop the year before? :o ) where I'm fueling up and getting ready to plow. The cab and duals were factory IH. The rear plow is an old #9 IH (P&O parts numbers) and the front, newer plow was an IH 110 Flexall.

Gary ;)

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