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Andrew Fritsche

Moving a free Grain bin

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Got our selves a Free 5000 bushal grain bin with a full areation floor and a stirator. Need to have it off the yard by next thursday or it will get sent to the land fill with the rest of the farm site, Can't move till tues. Looking at putting it on a donahue trailer to keep the hight down, its 22' in diameter and 25feet high ti the lid, What else do we need to do to move it, can we jack it up our selves orshould we get a crane? how should we brace the inside? Cliff can you repost your pics of bin moving? Thanks

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Helicopter?? I saw a pic of a helo moving a bin somewhere. Looked like a great way to do it.

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How much does the bin weigh? How far does it need to go? A helo might seem a little far-fetched, but maybe not. . . . .

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Be careful hauling it on a trailer in one piece. Two local men, brothers that farmed together, were both electrocuted hauling a bin home that way.

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Be careful hauling it on a trailer in one piece. Two local men, brothers that farmed together, were both electrocuted hauling a bin home that way.

I would have to say the same thing. It may be different where you are Andrew, but around here powerlines aren't any higher than 15 feet in most places, unless they are main lines, then they might be 25 feet. I would recommend jacking it up and removing the bottom three or four rings. It would be a whole lot easier to brace then as well. You would have to take them apart sheet by sheet because I don't imagine it would be possible to line up all the holes again anyway for re-assembly in one piece, plus you couldn't get it moved in and out from between the bin jacks... Just be careful to mark every sheet as to where it came from so you can put it back in the same place. They will fit a lot better, even though every sheet is supposed to be identicle.

There was a guy north of me about 20 miles a few years back that moved a few bins with a big Chanook (sp?) helicopter he hired out of St. Louis. Everyone said that it worked slicker than snot, but I have no idea what it cost him. He basically welded square tube in an "X" across the bottom of each bin and stuck a chain through the top hole, hooked it to a hitch point welded into the middle of the "X". You can't hook to the roof, or the roof will pull off like a pop top on a beer can...

Also, let me say that I'm glad I don't have to help! From my experience it's a whole lot easier to build new bins than it is to move old ones, but hey, I understand since it's FREE!!

Good luck

Bill

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Find enough bin jacks to jack up about halfway up the sidewall. take loose a ring of bolts around and a line down from the split. move the bottom in and nest the bin down around the bottom. Maybe there would be machinery on the site to help if they are getting rid of the farm place. We stacked 2 bins on top of each other with a hydraulic excavator once. Hydraulic settles bad so it didn't work too good but we got it.

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Neighbor bought a couple of bins from another neighbor and moved them himself (with a few buddies). He rented a telescopic boom forklift (Lull) to assist with the job. He said it was worth every penny taking down and putting them back up. Those things are a very handy piece of equipment for something like this. Make sure you get one with enough reach. We had one on the job that we could put material on the third floor with. Third floor was 42 feet. I think the machine would go to 54 feet. Good Luck and be careful.

Mike

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What we've done with a couple of 18' bins was to use bin jacks to jack them up then take off the lower rings in order to get the height down. We would take the rings off in sections of two sheets so there was less to bolt back together but it takes two people to move them that way. Once we got the bins down to about three rings tall we would back a low profile flat bed trailer underneath with bridge planks set across it for the bin to sit on. Getting the floor out of some of those older bins may be a bit of a challenge but be sure to number each piece so you know how it goes back together. If your careful you can probably just take the screw off the stirator and leave the rest of it but it will probably need to be centered over the trailer to keep the weight balanced. If you can find some bin jacks to rent they will work fine but if your in a big hurry a crane will speed things up but they aren't cheap so have everything ready for the move when it shows up. If you don't have to move the bin very far you might be able to just have a crane carry it and a big crane would be able to set it over the top of any power lines so the bin wouldn't have to be taken apart.

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have you got the floor and fan and auger out yet? that has to come out no matter what. im in the process of doing the same thing you are although mines a little smaller and i dont have the time crunch you have. are the bolts and seams in good shape? if they are questionable or are leaking, id call all my buddies and rent some jacks and get it done, meaning complete dissasemble. that way you can reseal the seams with new bolts. you may even be able to add a few rings and stiffeners and have a bin big enough to hold something.completely dissasembling it isnt as bad as it sounds. 2 or 3 impact wrenches and 6 or seven guys with a case of cold beer as an incentive for later and it will be down and loaded before noon. B)

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Five words of advice for you:

Bruellman Bin Moving Rolfe, Iowa

Jim

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You might try K&S Millwrights in Buffalo Lake 320-833-2228. I tore down 5 bins last year between Winthrop and Stewart, they brought out a crane $100/hr with a 3 hour min. 5 guys took about 1 hour per bin. As far as loading on a trailer it will work but is a hassle to do. Did it once on a 3500 bushel, tore it half way down and built a x-frame to keep it round, set it on a gooseneck, only moved it a mile would not want to go much further, bent up the bottom ring. What timed we saved from having to disassemble the roof was spent straightening up the bottom ring.

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Every bin moving I have been part of, we have took it completely apart, The trick to getting the holes to line back up is to number the sheet before you take it apart. Then stack it so you don't get it mixed up.

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This isn't quite the same, but we have moved at least 4 corn cribs in my lifetime. We had one that was just huge and we took it apart at the roof and 1/2 way down and loaded it on the trailer. If its not too far just take a skytrak and pick it up in sections and carry it down the road. If you come across low power lines, then get one of those fiberglass sticks used to raise power lines.

Tony

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This isn't quite the same, but we have moved at least 4 corn cribs in my lifetime. We had one that was just huge and we took it apart at the roof and 1/2 way down and loaded it on the trailer. If its not too far just take a skytrak and pick it up in sections and carry it down the road. If you come across low power lines, then get one of those fiberglass sticks used to raise power lines.

Tony

If you do not know what you are doing, do not even attempt to hold a power line up, even if you think you have the right tool for the job. You could drop the line on top of the metal bin and still light someone up. These brothers that I knew that were killed were doing just that exact same thing, holding up the powerline. It got away, came down on the bin and both were instantly killed.

I would much rather go to the extra work of taking a few rings off than to chance moving one under powerlines. That is the SAFEST WAY to do it! If these brothers had spent a few hours or even days dismantling that bin, they would still be here. Seems like a very small price to pay.

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Find enough bin jacks to jack up about halfway up the sidewall. take loose a ring of bolts around and a line down from the split. move the bottom in and nest the bin down around the bottom. Maybe there would be machinery on the site to help if they are getting rid of the farm place. We stacked 2 bins on top of each other with a hydraulic excavator once. Hydraulic settles bad so it didn't work too good but we got it.

We've moved a few bins this way also, put them down on a donahue trailer and down the road you go. Never had problem with power lines yet. We moved one 18 footer 17 miles. We had a 560 with a fast hitch on the trailer, it came in handy when it came to back the trailer up on the new pad of cement. Good luck on the move.

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This isn't quite the same, but we have moved at least 4 corn cribs in my lifetime. We had one that was just huge and we took it apart at the roof and 1/2 way down and loaded it on the trailer. If its not too far just take a skytrak and pick it up in sections and carry it down the road. If you come across low power lines, then get one of those fiberglass sticks used to raise power lines.

Tony

If you do not know what you are doing, do not even attempt to hold a power line up, even if you think you have the right tool for the job. You could drop the line on top of the metal bin and still light someone up. These brothers that I knew that were killed were doing just that exact same thing, holding up the powerline. It got away, came down on the bin and both were instantly killed.

I would much rather go to the extra work of taking a few rings off than to chance moving one under powerlines. That is the SAFEST WAY to do it! If these brothers had spent a few hours or even days dismantling that bin, they would still be here. Seems like a very small price to pay.

Early one Sunday morning I came upon a couple guys attempting to move a small wood bin on a trailer on a secondary road....

They had come up on a power line that was too low and one guy was laying on the roof with a 2X6.....just as I pulled up he reached up to the wire with the board to lift it.

The stupid ass got blown right off the roof by the charge and needless to say what was left of him was pretty toasted when we got to where he landed in the corn field. <_<

Just food for thought......

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Well it has to go one mile down a real busy highway, (highway 14) and then down our county road not busy at all but tared, The power lines on 14 are real high and to one on our road can be driven around real easy, How would the bin be attached to the pad? I know it might be a lot of work to move a bin but it is free and I did not know till i looked at it that it had all the "fancy features" Would not worry so much about this bin but it will be the first Grain bin on the farm, thinking it will be nice to have a bin, less time dealing with lines at the elavator on the busy weekends.

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we take the brackets that are holding the bin down on the existing pad and put anchor bolts in the new pad. Usually it's just a little piece of iron that goes over the lip on the bottom of the bin.

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, How would the bin be attached to the pad? I know it might be a lot of work to move a bin but it is free and I did not know till i looked at it that it had all the "fancy features" .......................thinking it will be nice to have a bin, less time dealing with lines at the elavator on the busy weekends.

& more time filling & emptying the bin, weekly inspections to check to be sure the grain stays in condition, ins. to cover fire or theft, elctricity & propane to dry & air the grain, not to mention concrete for the pad, electrical wiring, & an auger to fill it with. Just a few things to keep in mind that goes along with this "free bin. Once the grain goes into the elevator the only thing you have to worry about is selling it

Not trying to discourage you, I have a used 30' 9 ring bin sitting in the shed waiting to be put up. Bins can be a worthwhile investment but there is a lot of work to owning one.

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A friend of dads has borrowed our boom truck to move six or seven bins up to 5000 bu. He puts a truck tire inside the bin and raises it up to the roof, and puts X bracing in the bottom and hooks cables from the truck tire/wheel to the X and lifts them by the bottom and roof. Then he just heads down the road with them hanging on the back of the boom at about 5 mph. Only problem he has is picking a route with +/- 30ft clearance up and across.

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This isn't quite the same, but we have moved at least 4 corn cribs in my lifetime. We had one that was just huge and we took it apart at the roof and 1/2 way down and loaded it on the trailer. If its not too far just take a skytrak and pick it up in sections and carry it down the road. If you come across low power lines, then get one of those fiberglass sticks used to raise power lines.

Tony

If you do not know what you are doing, do not even attempt to hold a power line up, even if you think you have the right tool for the job. You could drop the line on top of the metal bin and still light someone up. These brothers that I knew that were killed were doing just that exact same thing, holding up the powerline. It got away, came down on the bin and both were instantly killed.

I would much rather go to the extra work of taking a few rings off than to chance moving one under powerlines. That is the SAFEST WAY to do it! If these brothers had spent a few hours or even days dismantling that bin, they would still be here. Seems like a very small price to pay.

Early one Sunday morning I came upon a couple guys attempting to move a small wood bin on a trailer on a secondary road....

They had come up on a power line that was too low and one guy was laying on the roof with a 2X6.....just as I pulled up he reached up to the wire with the board to lift it.

The stupid ass got blown right off the roof by the charge and needless to say what was left of him was pretty toasted when we got to where he landed in the corn field. <_<

Just food for thought......

This is EXACTLY what happened to the two brothers I knew that were killed. I was really surprised they would try something like that. If one has to lift a power line to transport a bin, they are doing it the WRONG WAY!!! Taked the damned thing apart!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

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