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from H to 80

hard on cattle

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Yesterday morning it was 57 degrees this morning 11, we had rain showers off and on yesterday, then about 4 o'clock the wind kicked in .

Soaking wet cattle with this kind of temperature change equals a vet bill , i hope not but time will tell.

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3 hours ago, from H to 80 said:

Yesterday morning it was 57 degrees this morning 11, we had rain showers off and on yesterday, then about 4 o'clock the wind kicked in .

Soaking wet cattle with this kind of temperature change equals a vet bill , i hope not but time will tell.

Herd owners here concerned as well. What occurs with the herds and what can the vets do to help?

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We are a day behind the weather you are getting. Not looking forward to it. We have some heifers outside

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We went from 36 degrees and light rain on Wednesday to 8 degrees, snow and 35-40 mph winds yesterday, real feel with the wind was -15 degrees.  That’s hard on man and animals alike! 

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4 hours ago, from H to 80 said:

Yesterday morning it was 57 degrees this morning 11, we had rain showers off and on yesterday, then about 4 o'clock the wind kicked in .

Soaking wet cattle with this kind of temperature change equals a vet bill , i hope not but time will tell.

Definitely Missouri for you. Seen a guy yesterday on my way to work must not watch the weather. Looked like he got up,seen it was warm and jumped on his Harley. Glad it wasn' me cause it was cold when I left work. 

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As cold as it is here, I'd much rather deal with it. It's much easier on the cattle than what you'e dealing with. I hate that when it goes from above freezing to below. Especially at calving time. Sick calves are no fun. Pneumonia can really take a toll on them.

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3 hours ago, MTO said:

Herd owners here concerned as well. What occurs with the herds and what can the vets do to help?

Shots$$$

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5 hours ago, bitty said:

We are a day behind the weather you are getting. Not looking forward to it. We have some heifers outside

It's 62 degrees and raining/foggy here (5:30 PM). Forecast low overnight is 30, high tomorrow 33, low tomorrow night is 8. I can't imagine what that would do to cattle outside. 

And every thing is 'cold-soaked' and 'sweating' - I have one of my C's in my garage, it is dripping wet, even the tires.

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4 hours ago, db1486 said:

As cold as it is here, I'd much rather deal with it. It's much easier on the cattle than what you'e dealing with. I hate that when it goes from above freezing to below. Especially at calving time. Sick calves are no fun. Pneumonia can really take a toll on them.

same deal here. We like it to stay a nice even constant temp. Plus cattle that are fed a finish ration are always hot and sweaty. The cool windy days are tough on them. That is why buyers are always looking for calves with the nice open long hair coats. Or extra fancy they call them. They have more temp protection with natural born defense to the elements. Funny thing it is 30 below today and two hay bales along hi way ditch on way to town were steaming snow off the top. I guess they are maybe close to burning.

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Had same junk here, -25 below to 45 above then drizzle and a bit of snow then back to 0! So far okay, but in January it needs to stay below freezing. Cattle are tough for sure!

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got home last nite around 11 pm and it was close to 60. Went to work this morning at six am, it was 35 and the wind blowing and raining. Got home from work at three pm, the snow was falling horizontally!  Now it is just windy. My cattle were enjoying the big snow drift piling up in the lot. Bucking and rolling around in it!

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Hope I don't have issues. They weren't showing any signs this afternoon, will look them over good in the morning. You just never know when it goes from 50's to the teens in just a few days.

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My cows love the barn on windy days. I stack hay to break the north wind and pile manure 10 ft tall to block the west wind. Trying to save a little hay consumption. Sure would like to get some wind break panels

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16 minutes ago, edwardporter1 said:

My cows love the barn on windy days. I stack hay to break the north wind and pile manure 10 ft tall to block the west wind. Trying to save a little hay consumption. Sure would like to get some wind break panels

We got 12 of them getting built for spring time use. We are lucky farmyard is 3 sides surrounds by mature trees but open to the south so when we get the backside of the fronts it gets cold.

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8 hours ago, db1486 said:

As cold as it is here, I'd much rather deal with it. It's much easier on the cattle than what you'e dealing with. I hate that when it goes from above freezing to below. Especially at calving time. Sick calves are no fun. Pneumonia can really take a toll on them.

You beat me to it. I'd much rather see mine standing around on frozen solid ground than ploughing through mud up to their bellies. Shelter stays dry (frozen) and facing to the South its nice and protected in the sunshine. I think we got up in the minus teens today (farenheit) and everybody looked content. That freezing rain last Tuesday was a little out of the ordinary and unwelcome but we soon got back to normal. 

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Sure wonder how you western guys keep cattle without buildings.  The guy I bought my miniature's from kept them out in the open with just a small pole shed and a wind break.  Claimed they didn't mind it at all, and my grandfather kept his Herefords out too with just a wind break.........Well, once I got mine here, it was like pulling teeth to get them inside, but eventually they learned when the weather got bad the barn was the place to be with no wind and a deep straw bedding pack,  on days like today, they go out for water and run back in.  Which is good, temps went from 60 and cloudy to 41 right now and rain and it's supposed to keep dropping.  Wet cow in the cold is just bad news.

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Our horses and two cows stayed out all night they didn't want anything to do with their run in sheds. Today their heads never left the hay feeders.

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1 minute ago, TP from Central PA said:

Sure wonder how you western guys keep cattle without buildings.  The guy I bought my miniature's from kept them out in the open with just a small pole shed and a wind break.  Claimed they didn't mind it at all, and my grandfather kept his Herefords out too with just a wind break.........Well, once I got mine here, it was like pulling teeth to get them inside, but eventually they learned when the weather got bad the barn was the place to be with no wind and a deep straw bedding pack,  on days like today, they go out for water and run back in.  Which is good, temps went from 60 and cloudy to 41 right now and rain and it's supposed to keep dropping.  Wet cow in the cold is just bad news.

Windbreaks are about all they get here.extra feed and straw when it's cold they do ok. They will herd up tight and be ok...

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36 minutes ago, TP from Central PA said:

Sure wonder how you western guys keep cattle without buildings.  

Our cows are just tougher.  No joke.  That's how they were raised.  Only time ours get to see the inside of a barn is during calving.  And that's only because we start calving in late Jan.  Even then they only get to spend 3 days max in the barn before we boot them out with their calf. 

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3 hours ago, Loadstar said:

You beat me to it. I'd much rather see mine standing around on frozen solid ground than ploughing through mud up to their bellies. Shelter stays dry (frozen) and facing to the South its nice and protected in the sunshine. I think we got up in the minus teens today (farenheit) and everybody looked content. That freezing rain last Tuesday was a little out of the ordinary and unwelcome but we soon got back to normal. 

I'm sure glad we missed that rain. About 30 miles south I heard they got a bit, more further south yet. Then yesterday southern MB got a pretty good snow storm I guess. I heard roads were closed this morning. 

2 hours ago, Big Bud guy said:

Our cows are just tougher.  No joke.  That's how they were raised.  Only time ours get to see the inside of a barn is during calving.  And that's only because we start calving in late Jan.  Even then they only get to spend 3 days max in the barn before we boot them out with their calf. 

Thats how it is out here. We finished up our fall calving right before the temp really dropped in December. Had a few of the last ones, week olds, in the pen so we kept the barn open for them while it turned cold. I checked them one morning it was about -30 and no calves in the barn. Looked outside and they were just covered in frost laying by the cows. They didn't want to be in the barn I guess lol.

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10 minutes ago, db1486 said:

Thats how it is out here. We finished up our fall calving right before the temp really dropped in December. Had a few of the last ones, week olds, in the pen so we kept the barn open for them while it turned cold. I checked them one morning it was about -30 and no calves in the barn. Looked outside and they were just covered in frost laying by the cows. They didn't want to be in the barn I guess lol.

Yep.  Long as the wind wasn't blowing we have kicked many a cow/calf pair out of the barn in sub zero temps. 

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