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Hair Sheep in the south. Have I lost my mind?

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My friends think I have lost my mind.  I am getting into sheep. 

Sheep are non traditional here in Arkansas.  Wool sheep do poorly in our hot humid environment (due to internal parasites) but these katahdin sheep seem to work well here.  I am starting slow and plan to build as I learn.  I bought 21 head (I have lot two due to my stupidity) and am learning alot.  They are like little cows that are easy to kill!. 

My long term plan is to graze them with my cattle.  I rotationally graze my cattle, moving twice a week.  I am told this will help keep the parasites down.  I need to learn how to do famacha.

Any suggestions?

I know there are some sheep herders on here!

Thx-Ace
 

 

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I have had hair sheep here in Tuscaloosa Al since 1980.

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5088downunder, Everyone tells me the worms have become resistant to most our dewormers here in the US.  I read y'all over there have a couple dewormers we don't have here (they have not been approved for use by the govt).  Additionally here in Arkansas it is moist and warm enough for the worms to be active most of the year.  I am getting set up to deworm in a few days with cydectin.  However I will only deworm the ones that need it according to their famacha score.  What dewormer (drench) do you use?

Mr Wilson, I would like to hear about your experience and recommendations.  Our climates are similar. 

Thx-Ace

 

 

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I use white wormers (panacur, safeguard) three times a year on my sheep

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You need a drench plan. All sheep need to be drenched and then put in a “clean” paddock. I can’t tell you what drench to use as I have no idea what’s available and what’s resistant over there. 

 

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..alternatively...you could shoot the lot and save a lot of work....:rolleyes::rolleyes:...

...no  only joking.....however we are down to 50 only ewes ....this to clean up various weeds following the cattle around......We only run about 230 odd cattle ..just a very modest farm......and the return on cattle for the effort expended is so far ahead of sheep....cross breed wool down here is virtually worthless.....that is not worth while unless you have 3000 odd ...and right now the fly strike is in full swing.....sigh....so many issues with sheep that never have with cattle......

Mike

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11 hours ago, mike_newman said:

..alternatively...you could shoot the lot and save a lot of work....:rolleyes::rolleyes:...

...no  only joking.....however we are down to 50 only ewes ....this to clean up various weeds following the cattle around......We only run about 230 odd cattle ..just a very modest farm......and the return on cattle for the effort expended is so far ahead of sheep....cross breed wool down here is virtually worthless.....that is not worth while unless you have 3000 odd ...and right now the fly strike is in full swing.....sigh....so many issues with sheep that never have with cattle......

Mike

One of the sheep guys here always said to have a round barn or pen so the sheep don't have a corner to die in

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We had a 18 wheeler to take out a power pole this moring at 10am, power just came back at 5:30 pm. I will look at what i am useing and post tomorrow. Which i do not have to worm, except maybe one a year.

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I have used Ivermectin sheep drench for years. About ten years ago i started useing Albendazole a broad spectrum dewormer. For the last few years i have been useding Diatomaceous Earth, which works good. Not grazing your grass too close will help alot. I am buying only St Croix breed now. No sworms.

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They are out of two of the few drench groups. Ivermectin from the mectin group and Albendazol from the white group. There are a few other groups. However, if it’s like Australia, poor practice and over drenching has led to resistance, especially white and clear drench groups. 

There has been much research done here for many many years on drench resistance. About the best way to get a good result is using a drench plan, drenching all your stock properly and doing worm egg counts from collected faeces to determine if you actually need to drench. 

I have no idea about diatomaceous earth. That’s a new one to me but the bit I just read on the net seems a bit random. 

We have at the moment, an all time low in sheep numbers in Australia. About 71 million. They have been a mainstay of Australian agricultural success here since white inhabitation. There has been a shift into broad acre farming in recent years but sheep are making a comeback with better wool prices. 

There has been much research into all areas of sheep wool and meat production here. It’s an ever evolving science. 

 

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