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greenredneck

combines in your life

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I’m only 19 so I have cheap junk. First combine I bought when I was 14 for 800 was a gleaner A from the 50’s. Pushed a 12 foot head and it will go to the field right now if I go mess with the carb a few hours to get it going. This summer I bought an 82 f2. It’s like heaven. Shut the door and it’s quiet. It has fancy beepers and lights that go off for no reason and it’s a diesel. Compared to that a it’s a beast. Now what’s next? Do I look for a cheap R 5 or R60 gleaner or get an axial flow. Who am I kidding. It will be whatever is super cheap and pops up on Craigslist 

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Growing up my dad liked combines and custom combining oats. The very first one I remember was a IH 62 that he was always fixing the canvas. In the late 70’s he bought a case 600 and that was a big time machine for us. No cab and I remember playing in the tank with the crippled grasshoppers which is kinda horrifying looking back at what could of happened. Then he bought a 403 with a cab. I bought a 83 n5 gleaner as my first combine and ran it till a couple years ago when I replaced it with a R62 gleaner.  

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I'm 33.

The first combine in my memory was a IH 715 with a German diesel in it and the quick tatch headers on it. I remember riding on a step stoll inside the cab with Dad when he ran it. 

The next one came in Nov 1990. A brand new 1620 with the 5.9 engine in it. Man when Dad got that I thought we were really something. I even had a buddy seat to ride on.

We traded the 1620 for a 2001 2366 in the spring of 2007. We still own that one though we are trying to sell it. We then bought our 2005 2377 in the fall of 2015.

Dad who is 63 remembers a pull type Minneapolis Moline with a V4 Wisconsin on it. That was then traded for a self propelled Minneapolis Moline that they kept until they traded it for the 715. 

They also had a one row IH corn picker that was sold when Grandpa bought a 2 row mounted IH corn picker to put on the 460 in the mid 60's. He doesn't remember the model designations on the Molines anymore. 

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I’m only 37, dad talks of a IH 76 before I was around. Grandpa bought a Gleaner K in 1976. We ran that till 2002 when we got an 81 F2 Gleaner. That was a nice step as it had a lot of F3 updates and a 315 flex head. Dad also got a K2 a few years after cause he thought the F2 was to big for him to cut fescue seed alone with since we had to take the 15’ head off the F2 to move from field to field.  In 2013 I talked dad into getting a 1640. That F2 was mean but that 1640 was meaner! Dad found ac1644 this year that he couldn’t pass up. The K and K2 was sold a few years ago. The F2 just left this fall and we ran it side by side with the 1640. Those two ran well together. Could keep dad hopping running trucks when my brother and I had them both going!

 

Curtis

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Dad had a Number 6 Sunshine. It’s still here too. Then he bought a PTO JD. Never saw it. Then a MF 587. They were a popular Australian header in the 60’s/70’s. Then a 955 JD. That was junk. Now an old 7720 JD. None flash, none modern and none much good. 

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The first combine of dads that I remember was the MF 750. I slept a lot on the shelf behind the seat. He bought that in 75, the year I was born, he traded it in the summer of 80 for the 1460. He had that until his retirement sale in 01. He always said that was the best combine that he ever owned. The first combine that he had was a 303, then a 503. He kept the 503 when he bought the 750, he said that he was glad that he had the 503 that fall because the Massey corn head wouldn't go through the vines, but the 503 went right through them! 

I remember the mechanic coming several times a year to fix the AC on the 750, dad never did say why he bought the 750 instead of an 815 . All he said was our dealer said that IH was coming out with a new machine, so maybe the Massey was a lot cheaper.

Alan

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For corn pickers, we had a 1940 Farmall M and New Idea 305 fully mounted picker from 1985 up until 2004.  The M had full fluid in both rear tires, and high altitude firecrater pistons in the engine, and the 4 mph 4th gear, so it felt more like a 560 than an M.  Dad went through a lot of snow picking corn with that outfit.  In 99, the clutch ran out of adjustment and it got parked.  From 2005 to 2014 we used a New Idea 6A pull-type picker or we contracted out the combining (we didn't really have much corn those years and local coops wouldn't accept cob corn anymore).  From 2014 until 2016 we used a New Idea 325 pull-type with a 329 Supersheller attachment on either the 806 or the 966.  It does an excellent job shelling the corn (the loads are almost clean enough to dump right into a planter in spring), but we broke the frame once, the hitch once, and an axle stub once from crossing sprayer ruts on wet years while shelling.  On dry years, it works really well and has no trouble keeping up even at ground speeds up to 4mph, provided a second person is emptying wagons.  On wet years, it doesn't pay to pull it out of the shed until there is a healthy frost or it dried up.

For combines, we used an early IH 105 combine with a 10'9" head from 1980 until 2016 for all of our wheat and soybeans.  Ours was open station with the non-pivoting unloading auger and belt drive, but did have the scourkleen and bagger attachment on it, a pickup reel and lifters on the guards , so it gave a pretty clean sample in the bin and cleaned up the field pretty well, even in downed crops.  It was small and maneuverable and could fit through narrow driveways into the small odd shaped fields that are prevalent around our area.  I always loved the sound of that C-153 humming through the field at full tilt.  The engine had firecrater pistons in it and an oversized main jet in the carb, so it actually had pretty decent power for such a little combine.  If you started plowing dirt with the head or were going too fast, the drive belts would slip; the engine never really lugged down much.  I really have no complaints about that machine (other than the dust and grit from sitting next to the grain tank without a cab), it pretty much always started and always did the job up until the day the grain pan and sieves failed after a pivot bolt broke.  All of the damaged parts were NLA and the remains of the few donors in the boneyards had been shipped to China over a decade ago.  For 2017, we upgraded to an IH 1440 for both corn (944 4 row, 38" rows) and soybeans (820-15' flex head).  Definitely a whole different level of machine compared to the 105...

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3 hours ago, Alan Dinan said:

The first combine of dads that I remember was the MF 750. I slept a lot on the shelf behind the seat. He bought that in 75, the year I was born, he traded it in the summer of 80 for the 1460. He had that until his retirement sale in 01. He always said that was the best combine that he ever owned. The first combine that he had was a 303, then a 503. He kept the 503 when he bought the 750, he said that he was glad that he had the 503 that fall because the Massey corn head wouldn't go through the vines, but the 503 went right through them! 

I remember the mechanic coming several times a year to fix the AC on the 750, dad never did say why he bought the 750 instead of an 815 . All he said was our dealer said that IH was coming out with a new machine, so maybe the Massey was a lot cheaper.

Alan

Years ago Massey had some wild incentives on their combines. I know the last  incentive they had in the mid 80s was you could trade a combine in that was over borrowed , over pay for a new Massey on their credit plan and you could get up to 20,000 or more cash kickback. Of course this was all added to your payment plan but buy a combine get a big incentive.

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Thanks Dale, I never heard that before, I do know that dad bought the combine from " the combine man ". I think he was out of Iowa or Nebraska, maybe some of you guys would remember him. I do know that the combine was brand new.

Alan

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I can recall these 

42 R  Pto 

52 R  cub engine powered  .bagger ,scour cleaner , still have manuals 

Massey Harris 26 Chrysler Industrial 6 cylinder powered 1949 10 foot grain header still have manuals and parts manual 

Allis Chalmers 66  

Currently Allis Chalmers 72 35 bushel bin , scour cleaner 

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23 hours ago, Bdse25 said:

I’m only 19 so I have cheap junk. First combine I bought when I was 14 for 800 was a gleaner A from the 50’s. Pushed a 12 foot head and it will go to the field right now if I go mess with the carb a few hours to get it going. This summer I bought an 82 f2. It’s like heaven. Shut the door and it’s quiet. It has fancy beepers and lights that go off for no reason and it’s a diesel. Compared to that a it’s a beast. Now what’s next? Do I look for a cheap R 5 or R60 gleaner or get an axial flow. Who am I kidding. It will be whatever is super cheap and pops up on Craigslist 

Impressed , proud of you young man , avante 

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7 hours ago, dale560 said:

Years ago Massey had some wild incentives on their combines. I know the last  incentive they had in the mid 80s was you could trade a combine in that was over borrowed , over pay for a new Massey on their credit plan and you could get up to 20,000 or more cash kickback. Of course this was all added to your payment plan but buy a combine get a big incentive.

Massey’s were just cheap overall.  I know a JD cost as much as the next size up Massey.  

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52 minutes ago, 560Dennis said:

Impressed , proud of you young man , avante 

Thank you. I learned everything I know from my grandpa and he has guided me the whole way but when grandma got sick around 09 or 10 the last thing he was concerned about was our 40 acres. So when I was 14 and my cousin was 12 we took our meager savings and jumped in. Now I’m working 30 hours a week, attending penn state full time for Agribusiness management and farming about 120 acres

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My Dad and uncle each bought a 21A Massey Harris in 1939. They had to promise to go on the wheat harvest before they could get the machines. The combines on top of 48 Chevy trucks and driving to Texas to start the harvest on about Memorial Day. They done this three years. Dad ran the Massey at home thru 1976. The Massey was a tough combine that was almost trouble free. The first combine I ran. Ate a lot of dirt and chaff going the wrong way. A dirty job at times but I loved combining. The last one I ran was a 760 Massey. Straight head, air conditioning and radio on. That was the life. Just keep the grain away from me and I was happy. Plus a beer at about dark. Those were the days.

 

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With the long dry summers for small grain harvest out here combines where here when most areas where cutting with a binder and using a thrashing machine.

 

Early 1900's Great Grandpa  had combine with 16 foot cut pulled with 32 horses all ground drive power and a sidehill model to boot.Family has a very poor picture with my Grandpa driving the horses. From what I know of history I think this first combine was a Holt,as they started here in California. My Grandpa farmed with horses until 34 when he bought a Cat diesel 35. From oral history he was using a Case sidehill combine pulled with horses until the Cat 35.

 

In 47 when new machinery became available Grandpa and Dad went together and  got a new John Deere 36B side hill combine with 16 foot cut still pulled with Cat 35. My Dad did custom cutting with this combine it ran from mid June until late August even into September in good crop years. About the time I was able to help Dad stopped all custom cutting and expanded cattle business greatly. But still cut 200 to 400 acres for himself and his brother until 1985. 

In 1973 I ran a warn out Massey Harris 92 sidehill for a neighbor. Used this combine to cut the first barley crop of my own in 78.

 

For the 79 crop I worked for my Dads friend that had a pair of Gleaners a 75 MH,and a 78 MH2. We started about June 10 and worked 6 days a week until about September 10. Had 2 weeks off and did another 1500 acres of safflower. In 1980 they bough another MH2 and I moved up to running the 78. I cut for this family ever summer till 86,when I bought a JD 95H.

 

Early 90's bought the 78 Gleaner MH2 I had put so many hours on. It is still here but been outside to many years,as I got in the cattle business and needed the barn for more hay  storage. The last times I have harvested any barley or safflower a cousin has cut it with a JD 6622. Grain has been crowded out more or less by wine grapes in this county.  Grain price is going to have to be much better to get me to plant much and not just graze it . Missed all the good prices of several years ago because of are 5 years of subnormal rainfall.

 

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Dad started with a 203 then a 303 then a low pro 915, then added another low pro 915 when I started farming and then another low pro 915. Then i got a 1680 (which is still going strong) and then another 915 low pro for nostalgic reasons and back up. Dad is retired and the first three 915's are gone, but we did have three 915's and the 1680 for one season.

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Our first combine was a Case Q Rosario Special pull type.  Next came our first self propelled a MH 21A.  Then a Super 27, then a 92 Special, that got traded off for a new 510 in 1964.  Then we added another new 510 in 1976.  Ran those together for three years until both were traded off for a 760.  Finally got tired of Massey and traded the 760 in for a JD 8820 in 1982.  Then it got traded for a T2 8820 the first T2 combine our dealer sold.  Traded that off for a 9600 in 1991.  We added a 1981 8820 in 1993.  Traded the 9600 for a CTS II in 1998.  Then we leased a 9760 STS from ML for three years.  Then traded the CTS for a 9770 STS and added a second one later on.  And now we have had several S670s.  Still have the last 8820 and we last used it in 2008.  I like to add up till the early 80s we always hired custom cutters to take a chunk out.  

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21 hours ago, Bdse25 said:

Thank you. I learned everything I know from my grandpa and he has guided me the whole way but when grandma got sick around 09 or 10 the last thing he was concerned about was our 40 acres. So when I was 14 and my cousin was 12 we took our meager savings and jumped in. Now I’m working 30 hours a week, attending penn state full time for Agribusiness management and farming about 120 acres

Also proud of what you accomplished. Set some ,gaols and keep working towards them,with what you did so fer I am sure you will reach them. I have a 18 yr old grandson, has abuot 20 sheep a few goats and a calf. scruonged up a few pieces of dirt to grow some hay  to feed his growing herd. Purchased a 666 i-h a new holland haybine a massey #10 baler and old jd side rake. none of ti very pretty but functional.Started when he entered high school at 14. Went to work for one of my many nephews milking cows before going to school in the morning and after class again at night. He left for New Zealand 2 wks ago to go and work on 850 cow dairy form for the next 7 months,for the experience and to see how they do things there. The pay check there is not too bad either. I am proud very proud of him and his work ethics  and am just as sure that your Grandpa is or (would be, you didn't say) would be of you. I wish for you all the best in your future in farming.

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My Dad never owned a combine.  Always hired it done but we cut mostly silage and picked ear corn.  Then I came into the picture.  First was a 702 Uni then a 707 uni both with a combine and ear picker and 4 row heads.  When we stopped grinding ear corn, I bought a Massey 550 Hydro with 4 row head.  Ran it until it passed out from exhaustion.  Then to IH red.  First IH was a 1660 6 row and I was in skunk heaven.  Then on to the 2166 and finally the 2377.  No combine ever left here with less than 2000 hrs. on the clock.  The 2377 has one more year to go to reach that mark, then I will retire.  Never had any desire to own one of the flagship combines, too much money to do the same job.  I've never increased my acres since I bought the 1660, so no need to get bigger machine.  Just a little tid bit; the 1660 is still running with over 6000 hours and the 2166 is going strong with 4000+ on it.  This past season the 2166 ran over 700 acres of corn with a lot less breakdowns than I had with the 2377 on 1200 acres corn and beans.  Chinese bearings were the main problem.

jerry

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I grew up on this pull type Rumely combine, behind our TD-9.

5a288d71631b4_TD-9RumelycombineK-5truckIHYaegersca1949.thumb.jpg.84b436f577d444a975aac68b38d3807f.jpg

This 123 SP McCormick is the first self propelled combine I ever got to run.

5a288d4bec917_IH123SPGaryJames.jpg.fea85656c581bf88c6a0bdcdd5f81573.jpg

Then we got the 141 SP and 125 SPVC SP combines. I had LOTS of hours (days) (Weeks) on both of these combines. 

5a288e98990f8_RalphieonCubCadet.thumb.jpg.4fca01dd28f012e513a657a654765a41.jpg

Then we got the IH 403 Windrow Special. It was our last IH combine, before I sold and left.

5a288ebd878aa_IH403WindrowSpecialIHCombine--.jpg.a192dacccabf5eb733ee4a6dc16af8c4.jpg

This was our harvest outfit in 1967. My father in-law owned the Massey Harris 90 Special.

5a288f75bb406_HarvestequipmentIH1967.thumb.jpg.e279180f4eaf3f71902cdc1676cf6a84.jpg

I got this C-II gleaner used and our son ran it mostly.

5a288f91d038a_1967CIIGleanerMike1980.thumb.jpg.1f469656d04bef19bee6deb9f7e796d6.jpg

The last combine I had before leaving the farm in 1981 was this 760 Massey Ferguson. OBG

5a288fbcb9b00_760MasseyFerguson1980meGary.thumb.jpg.d69c926bcbabbf6a5ad8ee29a2acc8ac.jpg

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MF 587 pto,  then a MF 3342 pto(still have) MF 750 , MF 860,         then discovered axial flow headers :wub:

1660,        lovely machine        have a 2166 now,         just finished harvest  73?? hrs on the clock

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32 minutes ago, ozfarm said:

MF 587 pto,  then a MF 3342 pto(still have) MF 750 , MF 860,         then discovered axial flow headers :wub:

1660,        lovely machine        have a 2166 now,         just finished harvest  73?? hrs on the clock

That's a thousand more than our 2188. 6294 I think but she is tired don't know if I could get another 1000 out of her without major money being spent. Needs about $40,000 in parts to make it through next year.

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As a kid , I faintly  remember the 52 he had, next came the 76. He did some farmer engineering and did a lot of custom navy bean  harvesting. The #91 replaced the worn out 76 and the first combine I ran at an early age. When the 2 row New Idea picker sheller was flailing, it and the 91 were traded for a 403 and a 4 row head.....BTO's now:lol: That year was wet. The 403 would go anywhere the wheel was turned. After we finished our corn and nearly every small farmer in the area as well, it was the end of Feb. Between the trad-in's and custom work the 403 was nearly paid for. Added a 715 when I was getting more land and some custom work on my own.When the 80's crunch hit, dad retired and I'm on my own now. Sold the 403 and some of his equipment at his auction and put two more years on the 715. Found a late 915 low boy and ran it till the 1480 became the next leap forward.When the second rotor cage failed in the middle of soy harvest one beautiful fall day, it felt like an old friend had just died. A farmer salesman friend had a late 1688 lease return  coming in. The next day I'm running beans and signed the papers in the cab a week later. Still have the 1688. 

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Was exposed to the 151, 403, 715 and now the 1440 as our combines

151 had a really weak back axle and when dad traded it for the 403 i think they made the old 151 into welding rod as much as the back axle had been welded back under the machine

403 hydro was really the best combine of all of them. Very little trouble and i learned how to run and set a combine on the 403.

715 hydro i do not know if we ever made a season without having to work on the straw walkers on that 715 but was ran the most and cut way more bushels than any of them for me. But with the 301 Diesel it always liked to run pretty warm

1440 not much problem except the front axle has had to be welded on right under the ladder on the left side. In fact right now it is needing a welding. But plan to sooner or later as i will have time

In the late 70's and early 80's started cutting with my cousin and his dad they have a Gleaner G diesel and it was a better wheat machine but the 403 and 715 were better corn machines.

S I L has a 6600 JD diesel hydro and Well i am not going to get into that. I guess it is ok

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