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lorenzo

Aermotor windmill advice please

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On 11/14/2017 at 7:28 AM, Missouri Mule said:

Find me one! Man that's a deal

Drive around the country and look for one in a pasture thats in good shape and go ask about it.

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Those are getting fewer and fewer tho

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3 hours ago, Ian Beale said:

The more I age the more I agree about climbing the tower.  And with pulling bores - we have a current problem with pump rods stuck in a 350 foot bore.

The big direct action (no gearbox) Southern Cross mills had an oil pump at ground level.  Incidently they got up to 25 foot wind wheels with a kit to go to 30 foot.

And in comparison to the recent problem that South Australia had with powerline collapses where the foundations pulled.  SC used 3  legged towers and IIRC their guarantee was that if your foundations held so would their tower

That’s  a bit more fairdinkum than our mills. Our water is only down 20 feet! Two lengths of pipe to pull up. 

I know I don’t want to pull up 350 feet of pipe! 

Those big Southern Cross mills really were a major part of opening up Australia to farming. 

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On 11/14/2017 at 7:54 PM, 5088downunder said:

When the wind pressure gets too high the fan starts catching more wind than the tail. So the fan then has more resistance than the tail, so it has to start to fold out of the wind. If the tail wasn’t offset the head fan would not have an easier option than being straight into the wind. Not sure if I explained it clearly??It’s a safety idea. I know Australian Southern Cross mills had the same idea. I have never seen the American brands mentioned here. 

Most mills in our location in Australia are being replaced with solar pumps. They are cheap and reliable. Our farm has four Southern Cross mills on it. Only one is operational now. All replaced with solar or an electric pump. 

Personally if I never have to pull another mill up or climb up a tower to check the oil in a head I won’t mind a bit. 

Being in the desert environment in Southern Arizona, I stop and inspect every windmill I come across when tooling around in the boonies. I want one for my front yard, but can't afford one yet, and most of them are full of bullet holes. Aermotor seems to be predominant out here.

The centerline of the sail or wheel is offset from the centerline of the mast. This offset gives a torque reaction when the wind gets too strong and pushes the sail even more off center causing it to skew. The tail simply follows along, with the tail spring always trying to return it to center. When the wind dies down, the tail spring will bring the wheel back to facing into the wind. The big knowledge or calculation is how strong the make the tail spring.

 

Hope this helps.

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Yeah I don’t think you need a spring. The tail catches more wind than the fan so it has to end up out of the wind. The fan turns allowing the wind to pass through it. However it can only turn so fast and then it effectively has a bigger surface area than the tail. Physics then force the fan out of the wind. Maybe the American ones use a spring but I know Southern Cross don’t.  

26D2BD53-13A8-4A08-8F5F-DA5447D96658.jpeg

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aermotor use a spring on the tail

they also have a brake on the hub

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3 hours ago, 5088downunder said:

Yeah I don’t think you need a spring. The tail catches more wind than the fan so it has to end up out of the wind. The fan turns allowing the wind to pass through it. However it can only turn so fast and then it effectively has a bigger surface area than the tail. Physics then force the fan out of the wind. Maybe the American ones use a spring but I know Southern Cross don’t.  

26D2BD53-13A8-4A08-8F5F-DA5447D96658.jpeg

On most of the ones I am familure with , Putting the Vane in the position shown in your picture does two things.

1,  It takes the sails (Fan) out of the wind direction stopping rotation.

2. It sets the brake. or Furl's it.

When ever you see one in this position and the sails are turning it means the brake is either out of adjustment or worn out.

This scenario is the beginning of the end for most Mills because it just spins day after day after day un attended prematurely wears itself out.

You really need to change the oil annually if you use these for their intended purpose.  Its a thin 10 weight non detergent oil and gets very dirty.

There are a couple places to oil or grease on an Aermotor like the Mast pipe for example and you have to climb the tower to do it so it rarely gets done. They last a long time but not forever

Especially when no Maintence is done.

Mine is a 1919 but was taken down in 1940. Back when someone cared about them.

Aermotor stamped the year of build on the sucker rod  guide inside the gear box.

Take note of how many you see while driving around  the country that just have a gear box on top of the tower and no sail's.

Its because it fell off when the main shaft finally cut itself in half from lack of oil and continuous spinning.

I know of three within a half hour drive from my place.

 

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Yeah I know it’s pulled out of gear. The photo was to show there is no spring on a Southern Cross. There is no brake either on the ones I have worked on. Not sure on the big ones that Ian Beale has. 

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39 minutes ago, 5088downunder said:

Interestingly you can still buy these mills. Here is a parts schematic. 

904A2951-3B61-45A7-ABEC-E670A91DB039.jpeg

You can still buy a new aero motor mill and tower here in the USA also. About 8000 for mill and tower for 6 or 8 ft mill the bigger wheels are about double I think. Checked online and I think all the parts for dempster can be bought also.

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Yeah that’s amazing that you can still buy them. Old old technology but clearly still relevant. I guess they would be a similar price. 

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5 hours ago, 5088downunder said:

Yeah I know it’s pulled out of gear. The photo was to show there is no spring on a Southern Cross. There is no brake either on the ones I have worked on. Not sure on the big ones that Ian Beale has. 

I haven't done more than drive past the big ones.  We have an IZ with a 12 foot wheel which pumps from a dam (pond) to a stock water system. 

I'm pretty sure that SC didn't ever use brakes.  They have a small ladder mounted on the head so you turn with it if working on them.  SC had an offshoot in South Africa at one stage.  And apparently they are copied in India.  One of your US overseas aid people once told me what a marvellous technology they were for undeveloped nations.

There is a history of SC which includes various versions of the wind wheels as they evolved.  Plus engines etc that they produced - including lathes and steam locos.

http://www.ploughbooksales.com.au/43.htm

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After 77 years it's in the wind again.

5a1cbbe5839f8_Image11-27-17at7.25PM(1).jpg.06763cb9ecce2be858ddc4e532c1d1dd.jpg

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5a1cbbed4c5dd_Image11-27-17at7.25PM(2).jpg.dc7ede2a1e11a07f4370f1191e306392.jpg

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On 16/11/2017 at 11:23 AM, 5088downunder said:

I know I don’t want to pull up 350 feet of pipe! 

Well we really didn't either.

The job is done.  We couldn't get the pump rods up and we couldn't get them to unscrew from the plunger.

The rods are 3/4" water pipe with IBC tapered thread joints and they're about 22 feet long.  The pump casing is 4 inch belled end threaded and random length about 17 feet long.  So the rod joints don't line up with the casing joints.  And we don't have enough pole to lift a casing length over a rod.

So push became shove.  Lift a length, unscrew it, lift the loose length about another 3 feet.  Then one holds the rod and the other applies the cut-off wheel to the rod column.  Then lower both  and on to the next - 19 more times.

Pump was stuck from internal rust from the casing so we won't be using casing or rods again.  But then it has been there since about 1955. 

Replacement will be genset /submersible or maybe solar/helical rotor.

After several lengths our son who was doing the bore end of things said "How many more?  This is getting repetitious".  I mentioned that a neighbour has one with 600 feet of pump column in it.

Edited by Ian Beale
extra

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2 hours ago, lorenzo said:

After 77 years it's in the wind again.

5a1cbbe5839f8_Image11-27-17at7.25PM(1).jpg.06763cb9ecce2be858ddc4e532c1d1dd.jpg

5a1cbbe890cc1_Image11-27-17at7_25PM.jpg.78e66b75da5c802ee3de608fad7c35d7.jpg

5a1cbbed4c5dd_Image11-27-17at7.25PM(2).jpg.dc7ede2a1e11a07f4370f1191e306392.jpg

That is a 40 foot model exactly the same as the one my grandfather erected in 1940. It was finally cut down 9 years ago and hadn't been used for years. Ours had climbing rungs on one of the tower legs.

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