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Hydro70

The 5th Magnum ever built is this 7130

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Its home is the CaseIH Racine Plant in Wisconsin or that is what it saids and wonder where the first Magnum is?  Talk about a guarantee payday when ya want to get rid of it.  This tractor looks like it don't go outside much and looks like it just came off the line this morning

5th Magnum ever built and this one belongs to the CaseIH Corporation in Racine, Wisconsin.jpg

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Magnum #1 got scrapped by Case IH. They wore it out. 

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6 hours ago, FarmallFan said:

Magnum #1 got scrapped by Case IH. They wore it out. 

Wow!  Must have been some really long duration durability test.

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2 hours ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Wow!  Must have been some really long duration durability test.

 

9 hours ago, FarmallFan said:

Magnum #1 got scrapped by Case IH. They wore it out. 

I am not sure how. If they wanted to keep it going you only have to fix it back up in our experience. I have to look at the hour meters on our Magnums to get the average. I am fairly certain that it's going to be over 12k on all 7 average

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If that is the tractor I think it is the castings on the rear end all have IH cast in them, not Caseih.

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From the book Red Tractors 1958-2013.

E0BBF5E8-D6AA-46CD-B4E3-B0CA8FAF59D3.jpeg

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45 minutes ago, FarmallFan said:

From the book Red Tractors 1958-2013.

 

that's a real shame but maybe they did it before they realized just how big of a hit the magnums would be. still tho you'd think they'd want to keep the first tractor off the line especially when it's also the first tractor design from the merged company. knowing what those old magnums sell for now i can't even imagine what that one would have been worth today 

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20 hours ago, Andy578 said:

that's a real shame but maybe they did it before they realized just how big of a hit the magnums would be. still tho you'd think they'd want to keep the first tractor off the line especially when it's also the first tractor design from the merged company. knowing what those old magnums sell for now i can't even imagine what that one would have been worth today 

I agree it would be some serious coin there 

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Thats too cool!

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I thought that was the second one built:wacko:

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Companies I've worked for in the past thought they could buy and rebuild machines and resell them at a profit. In ALL CASES they ended up putting more Dollars of parts and labor into the machines than starting from scratch with raw castings, etc. and building a whole new machine.

One company actually had a reconditioning process in place, send your worn old parts in and we welded them up, and ground them down to slightly smaller but guaranteed as new parts. We stopped doing that,  we accumulated old worn parts and eventually returned them to the foundry for remelt and made new parts from raw castings to replace the customer's parts. It actually turned out being cheaper for US and quicker turn-around for the customer.

Case/IH did the right thing scrapping #1 Magnum.  It would be interesting knowing how many hours and how many repairs it required.  Many companies brag about millions of miles/hours of testing, but in most cases that's over thousands of units.  Testing a Magnum to the end of it's useful life cost C/IH Barrels of Money, just having somebody run it that many hours.  Good friend of mine did durability testing.  He honed his excellent mechanic skills constantly repairing his test machines.  In most cases took three guys and LOTS of over-time to run a test.

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I you ever read John Deere history they took back a lot of their older test or first run tractors from the 2 cylinder days . Rebuilt them with new serial numbers and resold them as new tractors.  And doesn't A member here have the test tractors or first built for the 88 series ihc took and made into their load cell tractors.

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That tractor does not have any sn plates on it , the engine plate is on the left front but that's it . It has been at Hinsdale for its life sitting in the shed . From what I know they moved all the Case stuff back to Racine and the IH stuff came back to Hinsdale Engineering Center to there little museum .

Danny 

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1 hour ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

Companies I've worked for in the past thought they could buy and rebuild machines and resell them at a profit. In ALL CASES they ended up putting more Dollars of parts and labor into the machines than starting from scratch with raw castings, etc. and building a whole new machine.

One company actually had a reconditioning process in place, send your worn old parts in and we welded them up, and ground them down to slightly smaller but guaranteed as new parts. We stopped doing that,  we accumulated old worn parts and eventually returned them to the foundry for remelt and made new parts from raw castings to replace the customer's parts. It actually turned out being cheaper for US and quicker turn-around for the customer.

Case/IH did the right thing scrapping #1 Magnum.  It would be interesting knowing how many hours and how many repairs it required.  Many companies brag about millions of miles/hours of testing, but in most cases that's over thousands of units.  Testing a Magnum to the end of it's useful life cost C/IH Barrels of Money, just having somebody run it that many hours.  Good friend of mine did durability testing.  He honed his excellent mechanic skills constantly repairing his test machines.  In most cases took three guys and LOTS of over-time to run a test.

I've been to the Navistar proving grounds, I sure as heck wouldn't want a test vehicle.

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1 hour ago, dale560 said:

I you ever read John Deere history they took back a lot of their older test or first run tractors from the 2 cylinder days . Rebuilt them with new serial numbers and resold them as new tractors.  And doesn't A member here have the test tractors or first built for the 88 series ihc took and made into their load cell tractors.

Actually, that's against the law.  New means ALL New, not some new and some rebuilt wore out piece of crap. Somebody at Farmall ever tried that he/she would instantly be fired and probably do jail time.  Same way nobody ever walked out in the yard and " Borrowed parts" from a complete new tractor to put on a tractor coming down the line.  Where my Son works they build ten machines a day and borrow parts for every dang one from complete machines in the yard. Ain't NO WAY anyone keeps track of that and replaces all those parts so complete machines ship. The plant gets charged for parts and labor at a terrific rate,($1000 thousand Dollar owners manual)and the cost comes out of the assembler's bonus fund even though the managers and salaried planners have the responcibility of getting enough parts to the line in time.  Way past time for some heads to roll in that company if you ask me!  Good thing I'm not in charge or people would get fired.

One time,  The ONLY time we brought shipped parts BACK to the plant, The 2+2 and Stieger tractors used the same battery, 131010C1, 2+2 and 4386 2 each, 45 & 4786 3 each.  Shipping supervisor shipped a FULL semi load of batteries to Fargo, close to 1000 batteries, 3 month supply for Fargo, and left me with maybe a one day supply, maybe 50-60 batteries in plant and I used 84 per day.  I absolutely panicked, head of Mat'l Procurement & Distribution told Traffic & Shipping to get the truck back, OR Else!  We shipped 250-300 batteries to Fargo like I told them to.  They never over-shipped an order again.  But I do think a semi load of 96 or 104 dual wheels got shipped to Broadview parts depot that I had other plans for.

How would you like to buy a new car/truck and find out the engine actually had 50,000-100,000 miles on the test track on it?  Way I look at it, if I pay for it, I'm putting those first 5-10 miles on it myself!

I've read of several instances on another forum where guys have bought "New" compact utility tractors that have been sitting on dealer's lots for two years, and have had repeat problems with them, and actually coerced the dealer to replace the tractor with a documented recently built (last 2-3 months) tractor.  I won't mention the brand since that seems to irritate some people here.

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As long as the vehicle isn't invoiced parts can be swapped. As for test vehicles usually they get hacked up and modified for other tests until a major design change requires a new test subject.

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In John Deere history books. Like I said I like all kinds of tractors ,vehicles they actually have serial numbers that were marked in records recalled and re serial numbered. The 8010, 20 jd tractor is the same thing from what you read they all got recalled, rebought back rebuilt with different trans and sold as 8020 s that is why the few 8010s that never went back are worth so much. They did it with a jd C recalled and made into GP. The one or two C alive are worth 10 times their weight in gold. When I get back to town will have to find book and models to give exact numbers and recalled numbers. Now onto magnums this has been discussed a few times on here are not the first hundred or so tractors all have Ihc part numbers on trans and castings.  I know it has been discussed a lot they had parts built for first x amount of tractors.

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3 hours ago, dale560 said:

In John Deere history books. Like I said I like all kinds of tractors ,vehicles they actually have serial numbers that were marked in records recalled and re serial numbered. The 8010, 20 jd tractor is the same thing from what you read they all got recalled, rebought back rebuilt with different trans and sold as 8020 s that is why the few 8010s that never went back are worth so much. They did it with a jd C recalled and made into GP. The one or two C alive are worth 10 times their weight in gold. When I get back to town will have to find book and models to give exact numbers and recalled numbers. Now onto magnums this has been discussed a few times on here are not the first hundred or so tractors all have Ihc part numbers on trans and castings.  I know it has been discussed a lot they had parts built for first x amount of tractors.

IH was going to do that with the 2+2s.  They were going to recall all the 30 series 2+2s and charge the owner $500 for the smaller two and $1,000 for the 3788 to have the a new TA, clutch, other misc stuff and to have the hydraulic system swapped out.  It was suppose to start in October of 1984.  Course it never happened because other events over took it. 

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32 minutes ago, Big Bud guy said:

IH was going to do that with the 2+2s.  They were going to recall all the 30 series 2+2s and charge the owner $500 for the smaller two and $1,000 for the 3788 to have the a new TA, clutch, other misc stuff and to have the hydraulic system swapped out.  It was suppose to start in October of 1984.  Course it never happened because other events over took it. 

If you would have said Farmall was going to swap the front Kimco axle out on the 3x88 2+2's I would not have been surprised. But swapping out TA, clutch, hyd. system and whatever "Misc Stuff" amounts to, I'd like to see something or somebody confirm that.  I've never heard of a TA problem in a 2+2, Transfer case, Yes. Clutch is a wear part, Why would IH replace a wear part in a tractor 3 to 6 years old?  New hood latches I could understsnd. The truck hood latches came unhooked on lots of 2+2's shipped via rail the first year or two of production,  new hoods was highest volume service part first year or two.

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1 hour ago, DOCTOR EVIL said:

If you would have said Farmall was going to swap the front Kimco axle out on the 3x88 2+2's I would not have been surprised. But swapping out TA, clutch, hyd. system and whatever "Misc Stuff" amounts to, I'd like to see something or somebody confirm that.  

Ask Mr. Updike.  He wrote about it.

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