ccrider

International 250 Loader

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Hello I am new and looking for some information on a track loader I got. I have been doing some work fixing a few things on the unit, staring with filter changes and flushing the cooling system but I don't have allot of information on the unit as far as year. It has a drott 6 and one blade and runs good but gas some hydraulic leaks on one of the ram cylinders and a spring and cylinder next to the seat (is the spring under a load or can it be unbolted without anything special as to rebuild the cylinder? Here is the info on the tags 250 loader L250P 4844 2510

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The spring is a buffer system for the loader.  On a 175 loader I used to own there was a valve to cut out the spring buffer.  I don't know if it was a factory valve or if it was added later.

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My book shows the valve being on from factory I believe. You could cut it off if you weren't traveling very far with a load. From what I can understand, most of them leaked and were cut off for that reason. Understand that the spring was for carrying the loaded bucket over rough terrain it kept the bump pressure down on the cylinders. Those main cylinder seals don't last a long time either from what I gather. those that hae them can chime in a correct me if I'm worng. I don't have many hours on my 175C, kinda lost interest in it.

D

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I replied to this in the above thread that has pix. of your loader.--It is the Drott 4-in-1 bucket , and you had better be real careful what you hook into or under with it!---Mine has the dvt-573 v-8 engine and with that power and weight it is VERY easy to snap/twist that clam section right off!----I have been lucky so far with mine, but have heard that the clams are the weak point on the loader.--Treat it with respect and care, and you will never have a problem with the loader.

The cylinders are designed and made with enough leak to keep the shafts lubed and clean.---I have ALL manuals for the 250, and there are a bunch!---got mine back in 1990 or so new from IH and they were right at $150.00 for the set but well worth every penny as they go into the very heart of each section of the unit with much detail.

First off get the full set of manuals ( including operators manual), and spend about a week just going thru them. ( there is a bunch of pages/sections).

My unit is a much later model than yours.---What engine does yours have in it?? ( from your pix. it dont look like the 573)

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Thanks for the response, mine has yhe strait six with a turbo. I do appriciate the heads up. Right now i am fighting cooling issues, lots of rust is in the system did the dishwasher flush, tried prestone and evaporrust neither has worked to well. Going to get another flush and try again.

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What others have said is what I've also heard about the hydrospring. I have one on my Drott 150 loader. I have used it and also operated my machine with it off. It does provide cushioning to the loader frame when you are carrying a full load in the bucket and presumably will help prevent cracks or stress damage to the loader frame over time. Although all the other cat vendors never bothered with it and they never had any problems with frame cracking. And I don’t recall seeing an old Drott loader with a cracked loader frame either. So, never saw that much of a diff with or without, really. In fact, it's intended to be turned off when you are grading, which you can especially do with the 4-1 bucket you have (although without left/right tilt). The hydrospring can allow the boom to move too much during grading, leaving it off gives you more precisely controlled movement. Not that it made any difference for a hack like me. The only way I could grade is by backdragging and using the float function. ;)

 

So I would say just turn it off and go easy with shuttling big loads of dirt or jerking the boom up and down rapidly while the bucket is fully loaded. Or if you're so inclined, have it rebuilt. I think they have big leather seals in it. Someone should have them available or be able to make one for you. I have copies of the manuals with parts breakdown somewhere. If you need images let me know and I'll try to post them.

 

As far as the cooling system, if the coolant is really rusty and someone has left water or very dilute A/F in there for decades, you may have to have your radiator rodded and/or rebuilt. And if water with little or no antifreeze has been in there and you live in a cold clime, that also poses obvious questions for block/head freezing. I'd sort that out. Also, if you've flushed it many times and it's still overheating, make sure the fan is spinning (obviously) and in the right direction and the blades aren't all mangled up. And does it have a shroud? Make sure it's in place, that can make a difference. And above all, check the fins/cooling passages in the radiator itself. They get plugged up with dirt and oil over time. Thoroughly clean out all the passages with a power washer and engine degreaser as necessary so that you can see light through the whole radiator.    

 

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