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dads706

Harvest corn with a grain header.....

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Local guy had about a 3 acre patch (in a larger field) that went flat. It wan't twisted like a tornado would, just flattened. Rest of the field was fine. Must have been a wind burst or maybe aliens crop circle. In any case, he harvested it with his grain header. He said he went in the opposite direction it was laying (tassle end first) and went slow. He said there was a lot of material going through the machine, but surprisingly very little trash in the grain tank and not much grain out the back. He said it worked much better than he expected, but he'd hate to do many acres that way. 

I got to thinking about all the material going through the machine, but probably not any more than would be for wheat for example.

Just curious, anybody here ever done anything similar?

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ONE LONELY FARMER DID IT . GO TO YOU TUBE AND WATCH..

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Have seen it done on lower yielding corn. They say a draper header works good an out fit in Canada made plastic pan dividers to bolt on and they worked in our corn up here.

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2 hours ago, dads706 said:

Local guy had about a 3 acre patch (in a larger field) that went flat. It wan't twisted like a tornado would, just flattened. Rest of the field was fine. Must have been a wind burst or maybe aliens crop circle. In any case, he harvested it with his grain header. He said he went in the opposite direction it was laying (tassle end first) and went slow. He said there was a lot of material going through the machine, but surprisingly very little trash in the grain tank and not much grain out the back. He said it worked much better than he expected, but he'd hate to do many acres that way. 

I got to thinking about all the material going through the machine, but probably not any more than would be for wheat for example.

Just curious, anybody here ever done anything similar?

Kind of off topic and kind on topic.  Taking in the whole stalk is what AC corn headers did back in the early 30s.  JD started down that path initially but figured out all you needed was the cob when they introduced the modern corn header. However Oliver corn headers built into the 60s took in the whole stalk.  So I would say the idea does work but probably not something you would want to do in high yielding corn or if cutting a lot of acres.  Only corn I have ever harvested is with a JD 3300 and 343 header. 

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Did 32 acres of organic pop corn, custom work,  about 1999.  yielded around 80bu and weeds bad. 22.5 ft  9 30inch rows gave the 1480 a workout. Corn was not down, just very short. Owner did not want the head loss of small ears & I really didn't want to narrow up stripper plates. In drought of 2012 there were a few guys doing short, small eared corn that way. Not because it was down though.

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Oliver's first corn head took the whole plant in.

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6 hours ago, dads706 said:

Local guy had about a 3 acre patch (in a larger field) that went flat. It wan't twisted like a tornado would, just flattened. Rest of the field was fine. Must have been a wind burst or maybe aliens crop circle. In any case, he harvested it with his grain header. He said he went in the opposite direction it was laying (tassle end first) and went slow. He said there was a lot of material going through the machine, but surprisingly very little trash in the grain tank and not much grain out the back. He said it worked much better than he expected, but he'd hate to do many acres that way. 

I got to thinking about all the material going through the machine, but probably not any more than would be for wheat for example.

Just curious, anybody here ever done anything similar?

When it lays down a JD all crop header will grap it and bring most of it in also

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Have noticed the old 8 thru 10 series heads the snout points curved up. Good thing when your down and don't want to roll a snout under, bad if your trying to pickup down corn. My 2208 with the ahc and field tracker will pickup a lot of down corn with minimum loss. Had a buddy with 50 acres down in a wind storm 10 years ago. Three smaller combines 13-18 ft heads 3 days to harvest. Later he always wanted his corn off early. One year I took his beans off dropped grain head hooked to cornhead and got ur done. 

John

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My aunts husband used to have a A gleaner years ago and he had a pickup reel and would combine corn that way. It would knock several ears off and those were the days when lots of sheep was ran on the fields so it was all recovered. 

I have went out in the spring and got ends that fell down after a blizzard and used the pickup reel with 17.5 810 on a 715 but it was sure slow going.

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13 hours ago, randy hall said:

Oliver's first corn head took the whole plant in.

Does anyone have pictures or info on this? I wasn't aware that was how Oliver did corn and would like to know more.

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http://www.public.iastate.edu/~nscentral/news/2006/dec/stover.shtml

Did it at Iowa State University with their corn stover research combine.   We ran a 6 or 8 row all crop head that would pull in the whole stalk.  The stover would then go through a chopper and blower from a forage harvester at the back of the combine and then the stover could be collected in a few different ways.  Deere research team came up with a retrofit kit to convert a regular corn head to an all crop head so they didn't have rely on old all crop heads.  Pretty simple: just replace the gathering chain with rubber and add a cutting wheel at the forward hub.

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There are research outfits that still use an all crop head for 30" soybeans.  They have the rubber piece just as Ploughman said.

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2 hours ago, hillskinefarms said:

Does anyone have pictures or info on this? I wasn't aware that was how Oliver did corn and would like to know more.

This brochure is dated 1957.  I think the 40 was the last Oliver combine built with the engine along side the separator. 

oliver-1.JPG

oliver-2.JPG

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A big operator here Al Schneck did it quite a bit one year. I guess it was lodged or blown over or wet or snowed in or some reason.

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Thanks for the ad Big Bud, very interesting the things that have been tried over the years.

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