Sign in to follow this  
russ_alabama

farmall axle planter sprocket

Recommended Posts

Guys, somebody very recently (I think) posted a "what's this" topic, and had a picture... response was, sprocket that clamped on the axle of a farmall (like a M or H, I think) that was for driving a flat chain on a factory (i think) planter for those models.  I can't find the post, but am interested in the sprockets.  One person said, oh these are very common in my area.  I'd be interested in knowing what they're called commonly (so i can hunt one by name), as I'd been thinking about a project where ground driven would be hard good, but doing it behind the tractor would be hard, but coming off the axle would make sense.  Out of curiosity, also... how do you disengage that for road travel... do you take the chain apart?  I'd be thinking of running that on a M or maybe even my 544.  

Thanks, Russ.... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I remember the sprocket post-----Don't remember title.

Those ground drive sprockets were used to drive fertilizer distributors and belly mount planters.

Were usually tripped out of gear by a mechanical "dog type" clutch when lifted.  (sometimes tripped by the lift-----and sometimes rope pulled)

You might Google IHC model 457 and 458 planters.

I might be able to find one of the old dog style clutches to take a picture of.  Give me a few days-----will do my best to try not forget.

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

In the good old days we raised suger beets and had a beet topper that was belly mounted on our 656 hydro and used a gear off each axle to run it. 

Was a standard 60 chain.  You had to take the chains off for fast road speeds as it had no way to disengage the drive. 

You could pretty easily fab up whatever gear setup you need.  They make tapered hubs that would clamp tight on your axle and mount any kind of gear you want but wouldn't be split so if you need it on inside of wheel you would have to pull your wheel off to install. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
12 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

I remember the sprocket post-----Don't remember title.

Those ground drive sprockets were used to drive fertilizer distributors and belly mount planters.

Were usually tripped out of gear by a mechanical "dog type" clutch when lifted.  (sometimes tripped by the lift-----and sometimes rope pulled)

You might Google IHC model 457 and 458 planters.

I might be able to find one of the old dog style clutches to take a picture of.  Give me a few days-----will do my best to try not forget.

DD

Thanks... I'll look up those planters.  So, those dog engagements... we had those on a grain drill and a pop up hay loader... on these planters, that dog set up wouldn't be on the axle sprocket, but down about the planter, right?  You'd still be running the chain at the axle when the dog was kicked out?  Appreciate the info, and no hurry, but a pic would be interesting.  

I'm wanting to set up a Holesher hay bale accumulator to run without a baler, attached to a tractor, with a pickup elevator fabricated on the front.  12gpm flow minimum needed to run its hydraulics, so I could run it with the 544d farmall, but not the accumulator plus a added hydraulic motor too (for the elevator)... would be robbing from the min needed to operated the arm on the accumulator.  I've seen what 10gpm on my Massey 4253 does on the accumulator, and it barely operates.  12gpm works fine tho.  I could run the elevator off the PTO of the tractor, but I'd need to gear reduce to a mph or so at the chain speed.  All that's doable, but ground speed drive of the elevator sure is tempting instead.  Can't do it back of the tractor axles, as the accumulator doesn't act like a trailer, but runs on casters.  I'd be keeping that.  So ground drive becomes impractical, unless it was inline with the tractor wheel.  That's what made me get interested in that axle sprocket.  I may be going down a rabbit hole on thought (I'm prone to that), but that was my interest in it.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, 65806 said:

In the good old days we raised suger beets and had a beet topper that was belly mounted on our 656 hydro and used a gear off each axle to run it. 

Was a standard 60 chain.  You had to take the chains off for fast road speeds as it had no way to disengage the drive. 

You could pretty easily fab up whatever gear setup you need.  They make tapered hubs that would clamp tight on your axle and mount any kind of gear you want but wouldn't be split so if you need it on inside of wheel you would have to pull your wheel off to install. 

Standard 60 sounds good (and you can see above what I'm thinking about)... tapered hubs... made for gears?  Or, you mean a hub for a steel one piece wheel, instead of the hub type?  ... you're saying mount the gear to that, weld or some such, I guess...   Interesting... hadn't thought of that.  

Just getting in thought for my winter project... got that and cleaning up, rewiring and gauges, and maybe painting the neglected super M this winter.  Just got my gall bladder took out and have a 30lb weight lift limit for a few weeks.  Man, ain't nothing on a farm that don't weigh 30lb.  Ha.  Had the tank off the M and its got tons of surface rust everywhere (but the tank, oddly), frame, engine, sheet metal, everywhere.  Be something to do in cold whether tho.  It runs good, tho.  M&W hand clutch is froze engaged where the lever boot decayed and the neighbor that owned it a while left it out a few years after a unfortunate stroke.  Good old fellow, the neighbor.  I bought the tractor back, where Dad was the orig owner, after the neighbor passed on.  Probably a good disassembly and cleaning would help the clutch.  Sitting out two years sure made it a different deal on rust everywhere.  Makes my accumulator project more interesting... :)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You are right-------chain turns continuously (as wheel turns) with drive sprocket on axle.  Dog clutch is mounted on implement-----in your case the elevator.

Believe sprocket is split------so not to have to remove wheel.  Drives a flat link chain.  Should operate your bale elevator OK.

 

DD

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
4 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

You are right-------chain turns continuously (as wheel turns) with drive sprocket on axle.  Dog clutch is mounted on implement-----in your case the elevator.

Believe sprocket is split------so not to have to remove wheel.  Drives a flat link chain.  Should operate your bale elevator OK.

 

DD

Thanks, DD, that all makes sense.  i googled earlier this morning on those 457 Farmall planters and saw pics (a lot of good farm pic's from google images, and I camped out there a while)... that would work.  Only thing might be going up the 4 miles or so to the other hay patches.  Want to use the accumulator on three alfalfa patches, one at the house and two up north of the house a ways.  A fellow might not put that 544 in road gear and make 20mph with that chain running.  But you might not want that older holesher accumulator's non-steer-damped casters running 20mph either -- it likes to wiggle a bit at speed.  It might be the main limiter anyway.  I should take time to smell the diesel anyway.  :)

Thanks, Russ... 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

With a spring loaded idler on the slack side of the chain-------you might slip the chain off the drive sprocket and tie off to the side pretty easy??

Uhhhh-------since you are from Alabama and me from Mississippi;  we can maybe identify with "red-neck engineering" more than most!!!:blink::o

 

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a pair of those sprockets off an H if I can remember where I put them. I will take a look tomorrow

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been watching this thread. I have a few thoughts, as DD points out an idler would make the chain easy to remove. I was thinking that those split gears might be pretty tough to find. I believe that you could make a gear by bolting a plate with a hole for the axle to the wheel weight holes. Next weld a piece of 3-4" pipe as a spacer over the axle. Last weld a gear for roller chain to the pipe. You can buy sprockets and weld the appropriate hub for whatever shaft size you need. Take one of these and enlarge the hole to fit the pipe. This would allow you to run roller chain instead of flat. It may handle the speed better. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Delta Dirt said:

With a spring loaded idler on the slack side of the chain-------you might slip the chain off the drive sprocket and tie off to the side pretty easy??

Uhhhh-------since you are from Alabama and me from Mississippi;  we can maybe identify with "red-neck engineering" more than most!!!:blink::o

 

DD 

Yeah, that would seem to make sense... a long throw spring tension idler.  I like that idea.  Yep, you can take the redneck out of the south, but you can't take the redneck out of anything he does from there... I say that while my dog is chewing on a rib bone here in the living room and I'm drinking beer in the can.  Ha.  Hmm.  Seems like a bungee cord from the seat frame to... well... I'll take pictures. ;) 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 minutes ago, 12_Guy said:

I have been watching this thread. I have a few thoughts, as DD points out an idler would make the chain easy to remove. I was thinking that those split gears might be pretty tough to find. I believe that you could make a gear by bolting a plate with a hole for the axle to the wheel weight holes. Next weld a piece of 3-4" pipe as a spacer over the axle. Last weld a gear for roller chain to the pipe. You can buy sprockets and weld the appropriate hub for whatever shaft size you need. Take one of these and enlarge the hole to fit the pipe. This would allow you to run roller chain instead of flat. It may handle the speed better. 

Yeah, I can see what you're describing... from my motorcycles years, I agree, roller chains run faster than you need to go... that makes sense... I guess you could even go belt that way... ... I thought about doing a pto hydraulic plant for the whole thing, to get >12gpm, like a 20gpm plant, and rob from that total whatever a hydraulic motor would need to run an elevator... and have plenty of flow left over to run the accumulator... then the old M would even run it... but ground drive for 1mph chain speed is tempting to try to make work... 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Roller chain would definitely handle more speed and I would think more load than the flat chain.  (depending on size)

Will try to find an old dog clutch to get a picture of over the weekend.  I might have a split sprocket or so laying around.  Just got to walk and survey my scattered and unorganized junk collection.  (parts inventory)

Good thing about that------it's relaxing to an old codger's soul  (thinking about the old days------and dreaming of what you might use it for tomorrow.

DD 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
3 hours ago, Delta Dirt said:

Roller chain would definitely handle more speed and I would think more load than the flat chain.  (depending on size)

Will try to find an old dog clutch to get a picture of over the weekend.  I might have a split sprocket or so laying around.  Just got to walk and survey my scattered and unorganized junk collection.  (parts inventory)

Good thing about that------it's relaxing to an old codger's soul  (thinking about the old days------and dreaming of what you might use it for tomorrow.

DD 

 

I've still got a rusty kneib pop up loader out here that's a bit of a monument, stood up down at the end of the driveway, with a dog clutch at the wheel... to wheel drive the axle, to run the pick up elevator chain in it... it's just all too big and awkward to run with the accumulator.  Plus I don't want to cut up.  I've gotten sentimentally convinced i might use it one day.  Those things did work good on a grain truck, for loading a lot of hay fast.  ... ... man, I get the relaxing the soul deal... I was showing my young cousin the piles of "treasures" up over the corn crib in the old barn that Dad and Grandad built in '45.  Moms old ringer washer is up there, next to her previous washer (the old cast wash pot)... a few cases of grandad's beer bottles and whisky bottles are over in the corner.  I set Pops last work boots on a ledge there to see when I get hay down from the loft.  I went off to school in the 80s and came back one weekend... Dad and I went to open the crib door, and he said, "well I cleaned it out a bit"... all the horse drawn stuff of grandads was in there, but now was gone... I got real anxious about it and Pop said, "sold it to the Amish"... ok, that was different... going back in service was ok, somehow.... not that I wouldn't have rather still have it.  Ha.  I need to get the wash pot down and clean it up for stewing use.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/3/2017 at 5:18 AM, russ_alabama said:

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
On 11/3/2017 at 5:18 AM, russ_alabama said:

Standard 60 sounds good (and you can see above what I'm thinking about)... tapered hubs... made for gears?  Or, you mean a hub for a steel one piece wheel, instead of the hub type?  ... you're saying mount the gear to that, weld or some such, I guess...   Interesting... hadn't thought of that.  

 

IMG_0618.PNG

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Not sure they have a size to fit your axle

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
41 minutes ago, 65806 said:

Not sure they have a size to fit your axle

Thanks 65806... I see now.  I'll research that area.  That'd be a strong approach.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Dog clutch and split sprockets for now--------other ideas later.

Dog clutch (disengaged) on 4 row planter mounted on F-20

20171104_170757.thumb.jpg.b662d2676243765c81dc2f4b0042fc7a.jpg

 

view showing "sophisticated dog chain" hooked to dog clutch lever and hyd lift so to disengage clutch when planter was raised.   look closely to see drive chain from final drive up to dog clutch jack shaft

20171104_170326.thumb.jpg.9cbf682beb8757d1e865254dca395328.jpg

 

Another dog clutch mount-----driving liquid fertilizer pump on Farm all Regular----hand operated lever for engagement/disengagement

20171104_181358.thumb.jpg.c1bc39ef4b2aae94cb31b0ae024cf145.jpg

 

large top sprocket for mounting on Farm all M axle  (IHC manufacture)

small split sprocket mounted onto axle for driving front mount fertilizer distributor

20171104_173959.thumb.jpg.9a96da643a329efd189d44350bda91f6.jpg

 

Dog clutch cogs----split sprocket----jack shaft

20171104_172721.thumb.jpg.075b3b0de923502921f535dc012ecf12.jpg

 

All photos snapped today while walking through my non-computerized and totally unorganized junk collection.:blink:

Better idea coming-------

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't know what you elevator or accumulator looks like------

but might be much easier (and more reliable) to fabricate a small ground wheel (that could be lifted clear of ground for disengagement) turning a shaft from which you could subsequently drive the implement via roller chain.

Roller chain sprockets are available in infinite sizes so to work out your speed ratio----and would definitely be preferred over the flat chain.

Raise or lower the ground wheel------do away with need of the dog clutch and axle mounted sprocket.  Nothing would be turning during transport. 

????-------just some thoughts from across my mind this afternoon.

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

man, DD, I like your "junk collection"... walking around that collection would be warming in the glow of he good years... that f20 looks complete... it's impressive what they designed back then and how it appears to be well working.  My great uncles had a standard A and F20 that they planted and cultivated 100acres in corn with (before my time, and I only saw the tractors and uncles as they'd leased land out and were on very late in life)... I expect they hired the harvest in later years... didn't have a picker or combine that I heard of... my cousin has the A, don't know where the f20 went after the auction.  All that planter drive and pump drive you show sure looks well designed... i bet those fellows back in those years were entertained in the operation of that equipment... 

you're right about it being better at the elevator and ground driven.  I'm probably on a rabbit hole path on axle drive approach... just got the ideas going seeing that split gear in the recent forum...

issue is on the accumulator that It's a hoelsher 1000 that's meant to run behind a baler and the exit chute of the baler feeds into the accumulator... so to do this, they did a great design of the accumulator running on casters, so that it swings around behind the baler, not like a trailer, but like pulling a shopping cart backwards and swinging the front of it around while the baler wheels are like the cart wheels that don't turn... makes it like the baler is just much longer to pull and turn...

so the accumulator can't really be used like it should be in my case for a few reasons.... one, I got a faster baler than they were made for really... 100 stroke/min Massey, where a 60 stroke/min baler would work fine with it... but the bales come too fast for it and the arm that shoves the bales up two at a time can't come back down fast enough to get out of he way of the next bale prior to the baler having another stroke occur... so it catches the next bale... I love the baler tho... another thing is I don't have more than 17gpm flow on the late model cab kubota of my late dad's, and we use it for the night baling we are doing... and that 17gpm is almost able to run the arm on the accumulator fast enough, but not always... but another issue is the baling at night, spraying preservative on the hay, and we are in tight little plots that maneuvering is tight in... plus we need to run up the road to other plots in the dark, and an inline baler with that accumulator is 12ft wide... just impractical, and too much to be tinkering and monitoring with alafafa needing to be done in an hour to have the right dew to prevent leaf shattering in the too little moisture of morning or too high moisture at night... tractor and baler are fast enough for all that, but the accumulator is just too time consuming and near it's speed limit, with bales occasionally getting stuck in its arm... 

so, we'd just rather bale and come back and accumulate he bales and grapple fork load the next day after a night baling ... that makes the accumulator I have, versus trading to another type, seem to be needed to be run stand alone on a tractor... and a hydraulic pump on the pto of the tractor and hydraulic motor on the added pickup elevator may make he most sense there... 

but, given the swinging caster axles on the accumulator, where it'll be tied at two points to the tractor and towed and swung wide behind the tractor at the ends, that'd make it prohibitive to ground drive on the accumulator... the ground drive there would have to be a caster, which is at least hard to do, if not impossible... the elevator could be raised and lowered for travel or operation, manually with ease, as it'll be light... but ground drive anywhere behind the tractor rear wheels would be dragged sideways when the turns are made, given the caster axles on the accumulator... 

some of this makes me want to just build a hydraulic plant... get a 20+ gpm pto pump, a tank, a splitter, and run a few gpm on a on/off valve valve to the pickup elevator motor and always drive the remaining gpm thru the accumulator system ... so to never dead head the flow, if the pto pump is on... then I'd never be using the tractor hydraulics... and could use whatever tractor is handy, most likely the 544... and the elevator runs along to the left of the tractors left back tire... 

to use the existing accumulator and do the least mods to it, other than adding a bolted on floating front pickup elevator, and run it with any tractor, it seems that a hydraulic plant is what I keep coming back to... 

but you can see how that split gear got my rabbit hole of thought going... 

dont know if it's ok to post YouTube links in the forum, but YouTube "hoelsher accumulator" and you can see how they were made to run... the older dual wheel caster red models are like what I have... it's a good model... I just have a too fast baler (and no >20gpm tractors) and the wrong plots and baling time for its traditional use case... 

so maybe my winter projects include a hydraulic plant build... that's still interesting... long as there's work going on... ha...  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Went into all the pump, gpm, hydraulic motor, etc. stuff before, back last year... found a similar topic from this RPForum here:  

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I should mention that, while the hoelsher accumulator needs a 12gpm bare minimum to operate with a conventional 60strokes/minute baler (and minimum of 17gpm for a 100strokes/minute baler), it's not about any existing hydraulic motors in its system... it's just cylinders and valves, with that flow going thru the system... and, aside of the occasional valve and cylinder operation for a few seconds on the stand the bales up arm cylinder to several seconds for the whole table tilt cylinder, rest of the time, you just have the tractor send and return on one remote tied off as flowing constant... unloaded apart from restrictions of lines and open center valving... 

so the baler bales come out, first pushed by the second thats pushed by the third... first bale finally trips a valve actuator and the valve is opened, standing bales one and two up, hitting another valve actuator to return the arm down, BUT, must do so so fast that it's up, done, and back down by the time another stroke on the baler occurs (as bale number three is coming, and the arm barely misses it when things are good).... first two stood up bales get shoved over by next two when this repeats... as the last two of ten bales are up in the table, another actuator operates a valve to tilt the table and put out ten bales grouped to be grapple fork grabbed and loaded by the tractor later.  It all works great, but for my 100strokes/min baler.  

You want to lower the pto speed but you lower the gpm of the tractor when you do... you find a sweet spot that kinda works ok, which was 450-500rpm of pto speed... down from 2200rpm engine speed to like 1800 or so, I think... been a while since I tried to run it... two years ago, I guess... Nauss makes a kit to help the arm and I have that... they're extremely helpful in talking about the issue, as it comes up with the later balers... subject of a Deere with over 20gpm and attenuators to dial it back down to running good and not rough on the arm comes up... by that time, we were seeing that too many things, with alfalfa window of time of correct dew and encasing of leaves baling, preservative spraying, and tight plots separated by 4mi of fast road travel at night, all suggested getting the accumulator off the baler, haul by hand, and solve the accumulating with the hoelsher by making it a stand alone with a pickup elevator... then the elevator will push the second bale against the first with no third bale involved to miss...

I'm 52 now and typically my half to load and haul is only 200-250 bales max every 30-40 days, and I unload trailers later on the following weekend... throw 10 60-80lb typical weight bales up on the loft floor from the trailer, up the ladder and stack, down and repeat... apart from he occasional 100lb baling, I like the work, but it'd be good to get the solution for the years to come... 

so, I'd have go thru the calculations, but I believe 2-3gpm motor would run a two bale lift and shove elevator.  I've hooked up the 544 to the accumulator sitting in the shed and it'll run the arm, but are not robbing any for the not added yet motor and elevator.  

Of course, one could do a pto shaft to a right angle gearbox, and shaft drive the elevator, as the pto isn't being used running without a baler... and with just 2-3gpm, you could run both the tractor hydraulics to run the accumulator, and a pto pump, small reservoir for that much flow and load, I suppose.

only reason to get real devoted to a whole system ran from a full plant of say 16-20gpm is that the old super M could be just attached to the thing through baling season and I'd have a purpose for that tractor... running everything off pto pump system... 

whole lot of typing there, but I thought it'd help knowing what kind of puzzle I got myself going here... ha... here's the current accumulator spec and manual site, and mine is the older series that's red with dual wheels on each side, on the casters... any input is welcome... 

http://www.hoelscherinc.com/prod_acc.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Interesting operation-----never been around much modern hay equipment.

Looks as if hydraulic drive might simplify things------keep you in a much more versatile situation tractor wise???

What is the use of the alfalfa-----have always enjoyed the smell of it.

Where are you located in Alabama?  My son lives in Cleveland, Alabama (north of Birmingham).

I am situated along the Mississippi River (south of Greenville) in the Delta------not much livestock in the area.

DD 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, Delta Dirt said:

Interesting operation-----never been around much modern hay equipment.

Looks as if hydraulic drive might simplify things------keep you in a much more versatile situation tractor wise???

What is the use of the alfalfa-----have always enjoyed the smell of it.

Where are you located in Alabama?  My son lives in Cleveland, Alabama (north of Birmingham).

I am situated along the Mississippi River (south of Greenville) in the Delta------not much livestock in the area.

DD 

I think you're right... the hydraulic drive seems to make the most sense.  Versatile, as you say.  Just always comes back around to that.  I keep hunting a better path, but it seems best.  I read and hear of setting up a hydraulic plant that would do close to 20gpm total that $1800-2000 is expected, buying new.  Maybe that plant could be used for other things, don't know.  That might be the only use... but I've already got grapple and accumulator.  

The alfalfa is tremendous feed, but its very needy on the baling side, and somewhat on the spraying of round up side.  My cousin has the crop sense that makes it work out.  He kept crop farming since childhood and I went off to work and came back later to just cows and hay.  The field looks like he maintains it, versus how it would if left to me.  

I'm in a rural spot of north Alabama, between elk river and Florence, near the TN line, and work over in Huntsville.  ... Cleveland would be a nice area to be in... I have friends that live north of here in Cullman and like it a lot.  Ton of potatoes grown there.  

You guys in that delta have the good crop dirt, right?  Blackish soil?  Bet it's a nice area to see big cotton, beans, and corn operations.  

Yeah, it's been entertaining work on the square baling, and not a massive amt of it that we make.... dad always had square hay bales bales by neighbors until we went round bale, and then Dad got the first Vermeer round baler, and I'm using his second round baler now, an early serial number 20yr old or so 555xL, 5x5ft baler.  My cousin and Dad got on the alfalfa plot on the halves path, and he and I kept it up after Pop passed.  He's got a really nice 124 Massey square baler that his uncle bought new, and I was looking for one of those... really nice caught-up ones that were shedded and tight were at about half a new one at forty yrs old... so I got a new 1837 Massey hesston inline 3 yrs ago.  

Might have got the smallest new holland conventional new, if I had it to do again.  60 strokes a minute and would last my lifetime, same as the inline baler.  I really like the inline baler tho, no complaints on it.  Either would be fine, as would a nice tight 124 or old new holland or ford.  Just getting on the early point since new or rebuild, for a guy that works and commutes 3hrs a day also, was key (to just bale and not repair much).  Another cousin in south Alabama is a Vermeer dealer that also makes round baling kits for any baler.  You'll see his ads in farm magazines and classifieds where he's standing next to a baler scratching his head as the belts are all out and on the ground.  Half price on belting kits, and he's done those since the early 80s.  He asked if I was crazy buying a new SQUARE baler... ha... he and his dad put up 30k square bales a yr for dairy and beef,  and bought the first model Vermeer round baler that was sold in the u.s., and became a dealer soon after.  

But, I'm still round baling for main feed source, and using the 700-1000 alfalfa that are my half as a 20+ % protein feed to feed some direct to cows as a taming and luring mechanism, and also to run into a feed mill/mixer with either shell or ear corn and minerals, to make crushed feed for calves.  I just got a new to me Gehl MX 125 mixer from the widow of a neighbor that bought it new, and I was running the new holland 355 of Dads up to then.  Buying feed makes more sense for a working person with so little time and so little time off.  Costs $500 to fill my creep feeder wagon for calves and it's about half that to make feed, buying corn and what I have in hay.  I got a jaylor single screw round bale tub grinder last year in our drought to keep from buying hay from early feeding.  It's 30yr old probably, with gobs of hours use at a dairy... but is in good shape.  Adding liquid protein and water makes instant silage, but you gotta feed it in a day or two to prevent mold from wet feed.  Good mid winter feed for while herd, but I'm not set up for using it for just calves.  Need my lots worked on for that.  

We add $0.50 to $1 a bale in preservatives  to alfalfa (haypro II, acidic acid and proponic acid, to inhibit mold and heat formed from yeast), sprayed in the throat of the baler when baling.  But the hay is worth so much more as the leaves are intact, encased, green, and will be months later on the inside of a bale.  Plus no heat means no barn burning fears.  I don't have but about a hundred head, half in brood cows, but want to be back to 2x that at the point of job going away.  

And I thought of the square baler and accumulator that I could always put in a 10-20 acre Bermuda grass plot and put up a bunch of hay in a ground level shed for selling to horse folks... when the job is gone, of course.  Cousin hates Bermuda for the needy nature of constant weed spraying, and Bermuda people hate alfalfa for the needy baling... and it still needs some spraying too.  But, when the job is gone, I'd have time to make another income job and use of baler and accumulator.  

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this