Missouri Mule

Take over!

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IMG_2382.thumb.JPG.e66be722e23eb9c45ecfd1e1e3cbfdcb.JPGIMG_2666.thumb.JPG.4ce9c04461ad367a5aafd33c4b421e65.JPGSo here's my office for the remainder of the evening. Anyone want to take over and drive? Oh and here's my reading material for tonight. I scored it from eBay for $10. 

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Cool. What are we driving?

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Reminded me of Homer. 

Don`t tell me your name is Homer!!

Image result for homer simpson running nuke plant episode

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11 minutes ago, Jaa600 said:

Cool. What are we driving?

650 megawatt coal fired power plant. 

 

9 minutes ago, MTO said:

Reminded me of Homer. 

Don`t tell me your name is Homer!!

Image result for homer simpson running nuke plant episode

LOL! that's funny. No im not a homer but just luckily im not nuclear and my book says blue ribbon on it.

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Looks like a good night's worth of reading. Tell everyone on the space station I said hello :)

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How many tons per day?

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1 unit at full load is 725,000 lbs/hr. This plant has 4 units. SOOO 2,900,000 lbs per hour x24 hrs = 69,600,000 lbs./ 2,000=34,800 ton per day. That's provided all 4 units were at full load all day. Normally we run in area control and our power dispatcher can control my unit from downtown ST Louis. They have absolutely no idea how a plant works, all they know is raise and lower load depending on demand. Its my job to watch things and take over when I need to. If something goes wrong I take it and call them later and say when they can have it back. All those computer screens have a lot of data that we all watch. Not to mention there are dozens more screens that aren't even pulled up. You don't go to the others unless you get an alarm or having trouble with a system. Its my job to control the coal coming in to the plant, how it gets burned in the boiler, and how the condensate gets pumped through the boiler into steam and how that steam controls my turbine/generator to stay in compliance within the grid. That's about as simplified as I know how to put it. I have 5 men working in my direct order out in the plant. They're my eyes and ears and I tell them what I need and they do it. It takes a special group of people to do this. We spend more time together than with our families working weekends, nights, holidays, and birthdays. I also work in the plant sometimes as an electrician. Its a cool job but those guys I have mentioned are also in my hands and could be injured or worse because of a wrong move I make. So they are my first priority.

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I WOULD LIKE YOUR PAY CHECK...LOL 100K PLUS A YEAR

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Thanks for the explanation. I'm glad you put those guys first. A lot of people don't think that way. 

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How high a pressure is your steam? And which plant? 

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7 hours ago, AKwelder said:

How high a pressure is your steam? And which plant? 

2400 main steam pressure. 1005* 

when we are in area control because of the pressure swings and turbine valves opening and closing we set the main steam at 2350. I am at Ameren's Labadie Plant. It's a great place to work. 

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My brother worked as an electronic technician in a power plant at Hardin Montana. Now he is at a plant in Austin Texas.

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2 hours ago, hobbyfarm said:

What do they do with all the ash?

WELL, now that a republican is in office we are allowed to give it to the state etc for road maintenance. The fly ash is given/sold to concrete plants for cement. That's all about to change. Because of mercury content being trace amounts we wont be allowed to do that and it all gets a whole new multi million dollar system to a dry ash land fill. This will be a gigantic lined area that will be filled with dry ash and capped off at some point. Previously we sluiced it out with water to a holding pond and they would dig it out one section at a time and pile it up and sell/give it away like I mentioned. Its all about the politics and what we have to continually change to be in compliance. We have to place an additive on the coal belts before it gets in the plant to keep our emissions down but in turn it adds the mercury I mentioned rendering all ash useless as far as the feds are concerned.  Now the state will be forced to use sand and salt and cement will use something else. No matter how you look at it ,it will cost us money. Whether it be in taxes or electric bill.  

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I was wondering how the environmental rules had affected your place of employment. I hope they leave you guys well enough alone.

Here in Michigan a number of utilities are decommissioning a number of their coal fired plants because of all the environmental regs have made it not cost effective to run them any longer.

There was a plant about 15 miles from our farm that was shut down at the end of May last year. The utility decided it was no longer cost effective to run it even though a few years before that they had spent a lot of money upgrading it. The railroad that served the plant had even completely upgraded the line to the plant about 6 years ago. That line only served that plant as it dead ended there. They now use it to park railroad cars that aren't needed immediately. 

 

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Thanks for filling us in on Your job, wondered how much coal and all related operations.  Let Me get this straight,  before you could sell the fly ash, which could save concrete Co money and dispose of it in a useful way: but Y'all have to treat belt with something that adds mercury to ash making it hazardous material, thus causing it to be disposed of in a has mat way.  Who came up with this brillant plan..... let me guess!!

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37 minutes ago, red211 said:

Thanks for filling us in on Your job, wondered how much coal and all related operations.  Let Me get this straight,  before you could sell the fly ash, which could save concrete Co money and dispose of it in a useful way: but Y'all have to treat belt with something that adds mercury to ash making it hazardous material, thus causing it to be disposed of in a has mat way.  Who came up with this brillant plan..... let me guess!!

Exactly. And all along the company was getting tax credits to run this junk on our belt but in turn it caused the ash to do extensive damage to our air heater and precipitators that collect the ash because of the chemical reaction. So it was a lose lose situation for everyone. unfortunately there are a lot of old coal fired powerplants all across the US that are in trouble or have already closed. The truth is if it goes on like this your electric bill will double. Make no mistake solar and wind are renewable yes but not cheap to operate. I am only 32 and I hope to retire here at this plant. But the way it is going I am not sure of anything.

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On ‎10‎/‎29‎/‎2017 at 9:19 PM, Missouri Mule said:

650 megawatt coal fired power plant. 

 

LOL! that's funny. No im not a homer but just luckily im not nuclear and my book says blue ribbon on it.

My late father in law, retired Navy boiler tech worked in a coal fired power plant after the Navy until he retired at 65. Back in the late 70's I spent a couple of hours with him at work one night. Interesting place.

 

Rick

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37 minutes ago, oldtanker said:

My late father in law, retired Navy boiler tech worked in a coal fired power plant after the Navy until he retired at 65. Back in the late 70's I spent a couple of hours with him at work one night. Interesting place.

 

Rick

The company hires a lot of guys that were in the navy as boiler techs or on subs. That seems to be one of the only places that gives a person any experience at all in this field. I just kinda fell into it. I was a construction electrician and this was a good company and the plant is 35 miles from home. So 3 years worth of testing and interviewing and trying to get on they offered me a job finally. The unfortunate thing for me was that about the time I was trying to hire on the Chrysler plant in Fenton MO closed down so there was a lot of experienced guys in the electrical field looking for work. The company realized this was an opportunity and really tightened up on the testing and interviews. But I finally got it.   

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Looks like good reading! I work at a two reactor nuke but I'm in security so they don't let me drive!

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The big crawler crane that Plocher construction is using I hauled in there back in July or so. The old dresser and komatsu wheeldozers my boss bought and we hauled out on 13axles.

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How many burners in the firebox? Does it have any auxiliary turbines or just the 650?

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On ‎11‎/‎02‎/‎2017 at 12:11 AM, ArkLa 1086 said:

How many burners in the firebox? Does it have any auxiliary turbines or just the 650?

The boiler is Tangential fired. So there is a burner in each corner for each of the 6 mills on each unit. So 24 burners per unit. There are 4 units in the plant. No Aux turbine or Aux boiler, but there is a common header throughout the plant that supplies Aux steam to each of the units. Obviously you have to have atleast 1 unit on to achieve this. So we use the steam to pre warm the turbine and to peg the D/a feedwater system to start to warming it up before we ever put a fire in the boiler. We have inerting steam used in the coal mills that basically flood the mills with steam during start up and shut down. At these times the mills are the most vulnerable to a 'PUFF', or a explosion. I have been  We use Diesel fuel oil to start up. Once we have a fire established on fuel oil we start a coal mill and start throwing facelike powder coal into the boiler. After the 3rd coal mill we usually shut down the oil. We burn hundreds of thousands of gallons per start up. Each of the 4 units here makes 650mw.

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On ‎11‎/‎01‎/‎2017 at 7:38 PM, 1206 4 ever said:

The big crawler crane that Plocher construction is using I hauled in there back in July or so. The old dresser and komatsu wheeldozers my boss bought and we hauled out on 13axles.

Yah I see it out there. There must be a dozen cranes running around here. You should of saw the crane they just took down, it had a pad poured in concrete that must of been 10' tall and 25' square. It went in the ground about 20'. They poured for days and used a train load of steel. The job lasted 3 months and they took it down. They broke out the concrete when they were finished with a gigantic excavator and it took him a week of breaking because of all the steel. I am surprised they didn't leave it because it wasn't in the way of anything and I am sure they will need a crane there again. It was probably in the bid that way. job security I guess.

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I can see the steam from my farm and have driven by the plant several times do they give tours ? I'm guessing not, but it would be something to see.

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