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I'm at my wit's end over this crankshaft pulley on my 1940 B.

I tried half inch bolts and althread in the crankshaft hole with no luck. I tried a half inch tap to chase the thread and it ate the end of my tap. I tried a 7/16 fine thread tap and it went in fine. I then tried 7/16 althread and it pulled out without getting started. I can't get a half inch fine thread bolt or althread even started into the hole. The threads are not boogered up and I'm officially stuck.

Yesterday afternoon I tried grade 5 half-inch course thread, both bolts and althread. No luck. This pulley has a hole for a set crew, but nothing in it. If I could find anything between 1/2" inch and 7/16" I would use that, but nobody has such a creature. I put it in the oven at 400 degrees for about an hour last night and it went on a little easier at first, then stopped with about 3/4" left to get it on completely; I used welding gloves rather than run the risk of my wife making me sleep in the barn with this tractor if I used her oven mitts on this thing.  I got it on the shaft and lined up with the woodruff key then my dad held a 2x6 block against the pulley and I hit it until I split two pieces of 2x6, and it finally stopped as I said before, with roughly 3/4" left to go.   I don't like the idea of hitting it and running the risk of messing up connecting rods or bearings.


I admit that I'm no machinist. I don't have any Farmall guys around me that I can call on for advice or even invite over to sit on a bucket and give my advice. Both of my grandfathers were pretty fair machinists, but they've both been gone for years and I have no brothers or cousins in the tractor mechanic business that I can call on for advice. It's just me trying to get this tractor running for our little girls who are expecting daddy to perform a miracle in the barn and make their pretty red tractor that they've been waiting for nearly a year on to be fixed.

I am open to any suggestions. And if anyone feels the need to publicly berate me as another member did on another tractor site by telling me that I didn't know what I was doing, that I better just quit, and that I needed to take it to someone who knew what they were doing, then I guess go ahead, too.

Thanks in advance and God's Blessings on you all.

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It seems you got a little challenge there . First I would mike the end of the shaft to make sure it was not swelled up by a hammer or something .  A couple of things I would like to know is the pulley been on that crankshaft before ? And if so how did you get it off? They are not held on by a set screw. It does not work to heat it that hot you will ruin the seal if you have not already. I look forward to hearing from you

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Get a decent measuring stick (digital caliper will work )  and very carefully measure crank snout and pulley bore

pay close attention to where you are measuring and any discrepancies ,  As R190 said swell marks ..burrs or lips ,

post up the results here ,

My 32 T-20 engine takes 2 men and a boy to put the flywheel on and off

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That hole for a set screw? Wouldn't be the inside of a roll pin would it? I had a pulley on a "green" engine act like that. When  really cleaned I found a pin right through it. Drove it out and pulled the pulley by hand. W

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I understand that not all crankshafts in C113's were drilled and tapped however all of mine are and are 1/2" course.  If you decide to remove it again, do not use a puller attached to the outside diameter of the pulley, you'll break the pulley doing it that way.  Others have good info.  Did you get your valves adjusted?

Dennis

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All it took was persistence.  I decided that the pulleywas going on, come **** or high water.  Took my course-thread half inch tap and just started working it in.  I'd turn a quarter round, back up, then go half a round.  Fifteen minutes later it was cleaned up and like new.  Ever so often I'd back the tap all the way out and wash out the cuttings with spray brake cleaner, then shoot a little WD-40 in and get back to it.  Needless to say, the pulley went on quite easily.

Setting the valves took ten minutes.  A friend of mine who was a Caterpillar mechanic for 30 years came over and it went like clockwork.  We sprayed a little gas in the cylinders the other night and it popped off, so we're in good shape. 

I can't begin to thank you enough for your help and advice.  

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Success is a good feeling,  now you can move on to the next thing of the process.

Dennis

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