Nelson W.

282D engine trouble in a 706 Farmall

Recommended Posts

Hi all,

I'm new to this site, however I have been reading your posts trying to learn as much as I can about the D282 engine. I have learned quite a bit from your posts and have started my investigation into the this tractor. It was purchased at an auction several months ago so I have no history of this tractor. I'm trying to get to the point that it can be used.

OK, the problem is that Its' hard to start. We (my father) has two other 706 IH with the 282 engine and we are very familiar how these start and run. When we first got it, it was hard to start and had a  knock in the front of the engine at speeds below 2000 RPM's but the knock would go away above 2000. I set the IP timing to TDC (as the book says to do) and the knock has stopped but now it wont turn more than about 1500 RPM's. It stumbles and puffs white smoke and blows fire from the exhaust. I tried to fine tune the IP timing but it's the same. I noticed that the pump may have been tampered with because the non tamper proof wires had been removed from the pump. So dad had a IH service person come and remove the IP and he sent it to General Diesel here in Richmond Va. to have it rebuilt. The re-builder said nothing looked to be real bad in the pump. We had the IH service tech. back out to reinstall the pump and it wasn't much better. The valves were adjusted before the pump was rebuilt and they were about right. We had some check the compression and found it to be about 325 PSI on all cylinders. The guy said it should be 350 PSI minimum and up to 400. I'm not sure if that it correct or not. I have removed the head and sent it to a machine shop and it was found to have some cracks. We have found a used head that should be good and are waiting for it have seats, valve guides, valves and springs installed. The sleeve walls look OK.

My main question is that the engine was on TDC for number one and I wanted to look at the walls for 1 and 6 so when I turned the engine over the no. 5 piston started pushing out the sleeve. I'm able to use a piece of wood and tap the sleeve back down but is it NORMAL for a sleeve to get pushed up just by turning the engine over?

Thanks for any advice you can give.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maybe not "normal" but it happens quite often, without the head to hold the sleeve down they can pop up. 325 compression on all cylinders is pretty good for a 50 year old engine. That shouldn't make it had starting.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Guess that would depend on the style of sleeve. The wide flange sleeves didn't have much interference but the narrow flange one did and had to be pressed in. Any chance that piston maybe scuffed and now dragging on the cyl wall?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I don't think the piston or rings have abnormal drag on the sleeve as I can gently push/tap the sleeve back into the block. I have read on this site that the later 282 engines had sleeves that were harder to press in. I'm just not sure if this is a red flag of a failure to come.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I need your advice about installing the head when I get it back. What lube should go on the head bolt threads and the washers to get a true torque setting?

Thanks

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for your reply R Pope,

Is 325 PSI about right for the 282 engine? The tech. said it should be higher. I'm not sure what the other two 706 tractors we have would test at on a compression test, but 30 to 40 seconds on the heater plugs will start them but not this one. We have checked and all heater plugs are working and it just doesn't start as good as the other 2. I wish Dad had missed this auction. This thing is getting expensive. He has two already and would buy more if he could find them. He loves this model of IH.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Have the injectors tested, rebuild if necessary. Are the pre-combustion chambers installed the right way, they are marked. The cracks in the head can be repaired by a reputable head repair shop, don't throw that head away, I have had several done (DT282's). With rebuilt injectors, rebuilt injection pump mine start with as little as 15 seconds on the glow plugs.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks Louie,

The injectors have been tested and we have been told they are good. I'll make sure the injectors are installed correctly when re-assembly is done. Where is the mark on the injector that says this way up?

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have two heads for the D282 engines. One was from the rebuild on our first 706 that we have had since the early 1970's and the head from this one. If they are reparable please let me know.

 

Thanks to all.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

AS long as there are no cracks they are repairable. The head on my 236 needed 6 exhaust seats 2 valves. Remachine all seats and re surface. Engine is not running yet bet close. Oh 2 sleeves and pistons rering and rebearing

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Sorry, but both heads were called cracked, that's why they were replaced. I've heard of some machine shops that can fix a cracked head but I have never done that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There re different methods of crack repair. Welding is not always the best way.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have had three 282 heads repaired with welding that had cracks, American Cylinder head in Oakland CA, the owner claims he has done a lot of them, not cheap but they do nice work. There are head repair shops that are closer to you, don't use a general machine shop, you need a shop that specializes in cylinder head repair.  236, 282 and 301's use the same head, the later versions have bigger valves. It's very important to let the engine cool down before shutting it down, three minutes of idling is recommended.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

There is a specialty shop near here that puts head in a furnace and then welds its. They do great work but not cheap. I would not go to a general machine shop. You need a automotive machine shop and a good one. There are not many left in my area.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have heard that over heating, shutting down while hot and incorrect IP timing are the three top reasons for cracked heads. When we took ownership of this tractor the timing was off and was knocking. I think that may have caused the head cracks. Does that sound reasonable?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

waterloo,

Thanks for the reply, but what is expensive? I have no idea what the cost is for this kind of thing. Can you give a ball park idea of the cost of having the head repaired with the furnace type of repair you mentioned?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

You have other 706's, why not do a compression test on one of them that runs good so you know where you stand with this one?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
17 hours ago, Nelson W. said:

waterloo,

Thanks for the reply, but what is expensive? I have no idea what the cost is for this kind of thing. Can you give a ball park idea of the cost of having the head repaired with the furnace type of repair you mentioned?

Each of the heads I had done were a little over $1600.00 each, that included new exhaust valves. Rebuilt injectors were $150.00 each plus core charge.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

R. Pope

I think my 78 year old father (two time cancer survivor) would whip my 54 year old ass if I did anything to jeopardize the running condition of one of his beloved 706's tractors. I'll ask for permission first but I may try that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks louie,

That is expensive, but my farther called Winger in PA. and they found a good used head for 1300. That is with no seats, valves, springs or guides. I think we are in the same price range here. I'll be sure to keep the other two heads in case we need them in the future.

Thanks.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi all,

After calling Winger several times they now say that they do not have a head. They didn't bother to call and give us this information but we are looking else where to get another head. I may have to get the old head repaired if I can't get a good used one.

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Nelson, the pre-combustion chambers are marked with UP on the side wall of the body. When looking for a head try and find a late head, IN valve: 1.680, EX valve: 1.375, early head IN valve: 1.650, EX valve: 1.300. You can also have the bigger valves installed in the early head. Those dimension are nominal, the book has a range of plus/minus .005

The pre-combustion chamber installs with the port hole toward the bottom.

IH D282 precombustion chamber up.jpg

IH D282 Pre combustion chamber.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I put the bigger valves in a 660 head that had the seats pounded out. Worked great for years.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now