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560Dennis

Weld repair to Cast Iron vise Jaw

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We got this cheap vise for nothing , sick of tripping over it and to cheap to scrap it . Going to use stick mfg by crown 255 3/32 in a 1/4 fillet , I don't F know I three stick of 3/32 will be enough  for the 3 inch diameter , 9 inches bead, length better get some  more . 

i have not stick welded in 5 or more years so this will be fun or diasaster , wait for my son to come home so I can plead to get some good eyes to see the bead . Lol

Say any tips .

oh using cutt ing torch to pre heat it , I think I have a 450 f crayon some where. 

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I like to use a salamander type heater to pre heat/ post heat. Arrange some way to hang the part at heater outlet height and then you can move the heater closer to adjust the heat. This provides a much more even heat, getting the whole piece hot.  Also you don't have to stand there holding the torch, you can be doing something else. I think that way I get a more thorough heat because I am not impatiently waiting with the torch. Good luck with your project. 

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Gas grills work great for pre heat and slow cool down.

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I was told by my Lincoln welding instructor to cool cast iron slow after welding . To pack it in lime . So that's what I did , buried it in he fire ring with a bag of lime 

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All the talk about slow cookin' this vice is making me hungry. 

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On September 30, 2017 at 10:14 AM, 12_Guy said:

I like to use a salamander type heater to pre heat/ post heat. Arrange some way to hang the part at heater outlet height and then you can move the heater closer to adjust the heat. This provides a much more even heat, getting the whole piece hot.  Also you don't have to stand there holding the torch, you can be doing something else. I think that way I get a more thorough heat because I am not impatiently waiting with the torch. Good luck with your project. 

Got a photo or part number I'm interested in your quote 

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Wouldn't burying the part in lime be bad for the part since lime is caustic? I've heard of people using sand to cool castings after welding.

 

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I have just wrapped them in an old piece of fiberglass insulation

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Toss the part in a pile of charcoal, cover it, light er up. Let it get good and hot after a couple hours, weld it, toss it back in the pile and cover it up with more charcoal. Let it burn out. Be the best looking thing you've ever welded.

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In the old welding manuals from the 40s they cover this coal or charcoal for a preheat and you were supposed to make  a mini oven out of fire brick. Remove parts of cover or sides enough to weld with cast rod and acetylene torch which was was available at the time and recover let fire die and cool down. All the old skills  are being lost over time.

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Just finished repairing one for the local municipality yesterday.  I have always preheated with rosebud on torch, weld with Ni-rod, and wrap in fiberglass batt insulation. Have had parts that size that you still couldn't touch by hand 5-6 hours later.

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I gotta know!

What is your success rate of with  cast IRON welds.

Every one I have ever been associated with has been a dismal failure. Just a matter of time!

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On 10/27/2017 at 10:18 AM, oleman said:

I gotta know!

What is your success rate of with  cast IRON welds.

Every one I have ever been associated with has been a dismal failure. Just a matter of time!

I've got a welded cast yoke on my 656 three point lift arm....holds well on the post driver and that beats the crap out of it....

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