Missouri Mule

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dannyredfan    0
7 minutes ago, Missouri Mule said:

I told my buddy I am going to make a sliding track system to where you just slide the post to where you need it at that time. LOL

I like itūüĎć

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iowaboy1965    0

How about a sliding track system to bring what ever tractor or equip u need to the door? :D

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28 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

How about a sliding track system to bring what ever tractor or equip u need to the door? :D

That's what kids are for. The thing is mine is only 10 months old. He just doesn't understand what im telling him! I know.... Get used to it, Right?

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littletom    0

My shop has 16' doors on each side on side or long walls. It is 44' wide and 4 years old. The headers are2x10 the trusses are 4x12 pich. Over the last year one door opening began to sag in the middle. We pulled out one side of header replaced and laminated another over it time will tell if that works. 20' is a big opening for wood as that will hold the weight of several trusses. Your concern about the post is good one. Make sure you put something under that and add concern if is on fill dirt or a new dozed pad. Friend built new tobacco barn this year and has 2 post sinking one probally a foot so far. When I built a new tobacco few years ago we put 2 bags cement in bottom of hole let set up then set post. No problems so far. We don't have much snow. But the green tobacco puts more weight on those post than umpteen feet of snow ever would.

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1 hour ago, littletom said:

The headers are2x10

How many 2x10's were there? Were they all full length 20' ? So they just started to bow? Yah 20' is a lot for wood I agree. The more I think about this as much as I would like it I don't know about longevity.

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I think if I go with 40' I'm leaning towards #2 option. 

If I go 48' #1. 

I feel like 16' would be more realistic. I agree with you guys about steel being a good option to go with 20'. 

Anyone see anything wrong with 12-16-12 idea on 40'?  I realize the dimensions don't take into consideration the width of post. This is just for sake of discussion. 

IMG_2555.JPG

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Ihfan4life    0

Build a truss "rafter" or "beam"- what ever you want to call it 

4 ft high by x feet long. Without a doubt it would carry any load and be easier than steel to attach to.

You could have the truss / rafter company build it and design it to carry your load rating that you need

Sid

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TomH    0

Any properly engineered header will not sag and have higher load capability than a steel beam. Like in the picture I posted, you can do whatever you want, it just has to be designed to the specs whether you want a 14' opening or 20' opening. Your posts and footers as well have to be engineered to carry it. I worked in agricultural construction and pole barns for 25 years, we built a 3 sided shed to back tractor trailers in that has a 40' clear span. The glulam beam is 14 " wide and 36" tall!

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1480x3    0

Just looked for sure, mine has 5 2x12, 22ft opening, 4 - 50ft trusses sitting on it, 5/12 roof pitch in northern IN. Built in 2000, it looks like the day it was built.

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ih88    0
15 hours ago, Mudfly said:

There is NO weight on the gable end.  The truss carries it all just like it does on the other trusses.   If the truss couldn't carry the weight, you would need a post in the center of every truss in your pole buildings.

 

Onthe long sidewall, the truss needs something to sit on, hence the need for a large beam if there is no post.  

I would put the opening on the gable end. Truss carries all the weight, so you can have any size door up to the width of the truss. Also extend the roof out a couple feet for a nice overhang at the entrance. Also no gutter required on gable end and no snow sliding off roof in front of your doorway.  Jim.

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mader656    0

Is it possible to make the 40 side the gable... Obviously more cost but doors as you please....

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Thanks guys for all the replies. This is the time I wish my Dad was still around. We would of sat down together and hashed this out over some coffee or even a cold beer. And sometimes walked away in disagreement but mostly came up with a plan. So all your ideas are greatly appreciated to help me gather a plan. Thanks again. 

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mader656    0

24 foot clear span...0913170818a.thumb.jpg.bc7c3851413b51ffb8f68ff5ece32085.jpg

Too bad your 1500 miles away...0913170819.thumb.jpg.54fd8054fc0e4b7c6ce560ee64cffc99.jpg

All extra...

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9 hours ago, Missouri Mule said:

I think if I go with 40' I'm leaning towards #2 option. 

If I go 48' #1. 

I feel like 16' would be more realistic. I agree with you guys about steel being a good option to go with 20'. 

Anyone see anything wrong with 12-16-12 idea on 40'?  I realize the dimensions don't take into consideration the width of post. This is just for sake of discussion. 

IMG_2555.JPG

My thoughts-

 If you are going to have bays as you have pictured, you almost have to dedicate one bay for each piece of equipment and build it accordingly. Because every piece varies so you will find some bays will have wasted space and some will not be quite wide enough.

I realize a building as you have drawn makes it easier to get out an individual piece without having to move something else, a building with doors on each gable end will let you use space more efficiently.

I also understand about having to draw the line somewhere, but our feed warehouse is 30x50 and it really is not very big. Seemed big on paper but not so much once it was built. Go as big as you possibly can now, you will never regret it.

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Pegasus    0

Take a look at how airplane hangars are built.  My door is 48x12.  It has a doubled truss on the end  to mount the door too.  Standard T hangars have 40 ft doors.

IMG_3596.JPG

DSC_5195.JPG

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bitty    0

To figure what size you want park all of the equipment you want to put in there inside of a barrier made from soil conservation flags on the grass . This is a starting point

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I finally got ahold of one of owners of the company that gave me a bid. He said typically they will span 20' and have 2- 2x12'' lvl lam beams on one side of the post notched in 1 deep. And on the other side of the post he uses 2 2x12's. The whole thing gets bolted together and the trusses sit on top with a crippler block nailed between the headers which then the truss is face nailed to the block. everywhere else the truss hits a post and they are face nailed to the upper end of the post on 8' centers. He said they would dig a bigger hole on those posts and pour quickcrete  in the bottom. The post then gets some kind of precast bottom on it with galvanized barbs that help with wind uplift. The only thing I didn't like was they still just use a 6x6. I am sure its adequate but I would pay for a bigger post across the front just to be safe.

Where the building is going the gable walls just wont work out as good as they would normally. The way I am talking it would face my existing buildings and really work out nice. So the final deal he quoted me was a 30x56 12' sidewalls with long wall open. 2 20' bays and 1 16' bay. Engineered trusses 8' OC with 2x6 purlins and girts. All built and turn key $11,100. I have had several prices also but this guy is more local and seem to have a reputable business going on. I feel like I can get a bunch of equipment covered for not a whole bunch of money. One other important thing I should add is that in the future when I "might" turn this onto a workshop. That's a whole different story and reasoning. How does this price sound for size of building? I know the first thing someone will say is go higher, but my tractors and dump truck and little gleaner combine will live here and that's plenty high to get them in. If I turn it into my shop that's good enough for height also. My current shop is same height and I can get all my stuff in there and work. I don't own anything bigger and doubt I ever will for my size of operation. 

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1480x3    0

Sounds good $ wise for the size, only thing I would do on that building would be to tell him I want double posts, positioned so they don't reduce opening width. I would sleep better with 4 posts on a 56 ft wall instead of 2. Although 2 must meet local codes. Do you ever get a freak snow storm, wet & deep. 2 may meet code but who writes the check to put it back ? 2 extra posts are pretty cheap at this stage.

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10 minutes ago, 1480x3 said:

Sounds good $ wise for the size, only thing I would do on that building would be to tell him I want double posts, positioned so they don't reduce opening width. I would sleep better with 4 posts on a 56 ft wall instead of 2. Although 2 must meet local codes. Do you ever get a freak snow storm, wet & deep. 2 may meet code but who writes the check to put it back ? 2 extra posts are pretty cheap at this stage.

agreed

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iowaboy1965    0

I know of a guy that just retired from an off farm job and has 180 or so horse fwa allis and a large gleaner to farm 80 acres with. I would want to go taller if you have very many years left at alll chances are you will acquire something bigger at some point. I dont have what you have but if i ever built a shop its probably gonna be 16' sidewalls so i can put a lift in for cars /trucks and have plenty of head room.....

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What about something with a single plane roof?  There is no gable like that so you might save $$ on rafter construction and materials. Pull the tractors in forward so the cabs are towards the tall end. I know that doesn't give you header material but the roof would not weigh as much which should help your span problems I would think.  I'm not an engineer by any means. Free advice is just that I suppose...

IMG_3887.JPG

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bitty    0
13 minutes ago, iowaboy1965 said:

I know of a guy that just retired from an off farm job and has 180 or so horse fwa allis and a large gleaner to farm 80 acres with. I would want to go taller if you have very many years left at alll chances are you will acquire something bigger at some point. I dont have what you have but if i ever built a shop its probably gonna be 16' sidewalls so i can put a lift in for cars /trucks and have plenty of head room.....

And what is the clearance UNDER the header on the 12' building you are quoting. Usually it's underside of the trusses not the headers from what I have seen. I will only build 14' or more, even if building it at home. The camper is tall, and you never know what the future holds. Been there before, our shop has a 14x14 and a 14x22 and I really wish that I put in a much bigger door. And 18' celling rather than the 16' we went with

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29 minutes ago, bitty said:

And what is the clearance UNDER the header on the 12' building you are quoting. Usually it's underside of the trusses not the headers from what I have seen. I will only build 14' or more, even if building it at home. The camper is tall, and you never know what the future holds. Been there before, our shop has a 14x14 and a 14x22 and I really wish that I put in a much bigger door. And 18' celling rather than the 16' we went with

That's correct, this would only have 11' to the bottom of the header.

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mader656    0
2 hours ago, Sledgehammer said:

What about something with a single plane roof?  There is no gable like that so you might save $$ on rafter construction and materials. Pull the tractors in forward so the cabs are towards the tall end. I know that doesn't give you header material but the roof would not weigh as much which should help your span problems I would think.  I'm not an engineer by any means. Free advice is just that I suppose...

IMG_3887.JPG

That is darn near my barn....8x10 post big old glue lams down the middle engenired joists for purulins bcis... Post. 24 oc.

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Because everyone kept telling me to go taller, I made a call and found out it was only $900 to go to 14' sidewalls. So that is what I will do. I expected it to be higher.

And on a lighter note a Amish builder finally got back with me tonight. He said he works all day and tries to get back with people in the evenings which is why it took a while. He quoted me a 30x50 with 14' sidewalls built for $11,000. He also knocked off 300 more because I mentioned he could use my skidsteer. Also his barn is built a little better than my previous quote with the trusses closer together and better lumber and 45yr metal. He even insisted on rat guard and trimming the lvl headers out to protect them. So for $10,700 total turnkey after getting some more details I told him pencil me in. I doubt anyone will beat that price by much. Another note I asked him once he got here how many days to build? He said they would be done in 1 day! That's impressive

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